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sonixtorm

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About sonixtorm

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    Club Member

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Nial
  • Gender*
    Male
  • Toyota Model
    Yaris
  • Toyota Year
    2006
  • Location
    Carmarthenshire
  1. You are probably going to hate me fore saying this, but think long and hard before you go for a T180. They seem particularly prone to the issues discussed on this thread (not scientifically, but that is my perception), and when things go wrong they can be expensive to repair. Bear in mind that the early engines were 'repaired' (with varying degrees of success) rather than getting the 3/4 engine from Toyota. If you do decide to get one, worth ensuring you establish that your chosen vehicle has had the latter. Thank for the infoWhen you say later cars do you mean after a certain time I.e 2007+?
  2. You are probably going to hate me fore saying this, but think long and hard before you go for a T180. They seem particularly prone to the issues discussed on this thread (not scientifically, but that is my perception), and when things go wrong they can be expensive to repair. Bear in mind that the early engines were 'repaired' (with varying degrees of success) rather than getting the 3/4 engine from Toyota. If you do decide to get one, worth ensuring you establish that your chosen vehicle has had the latter.
  3. The code you got was probably P2002. Prior to getting to replacement the engines can get very sooted up, and I don't know what the Toyota procedure cleans/checks as a part of the replacement. If not the DPNR/CAT itself, blocked pipework to the differential pressure sensor can cause this code (the pressure sensor is how the ECU measures the CAT). If this is the case, a decent blow through with an air line will likely do the trick. I have a vague recollection that modified pipework was fitted to later cars.
  4. I think the other point worth bearing in mind is that the extended warranty is "good will". Essentially, Toyota determine the rules. I hope some evidence of a pre-existing carbon clogging issue can be found (is an alternate Toyota garage able to pick anything up from the computer system?) as the offer to reconsider suggests that TGB may be open to replacing the engine. Terrible situation to be in :(
  5. I'm pretty sure the oil light is a level sensor on the Rav, rather than a pressure sensor, so not as catastrophic as it would be on a lot of cars. Maybe a premonition on the part of Toyota? ;)
  6. There is a fuse you can pull to clear codes. I think it's labelled ECU, but a quick search should confirm.
  7. Exactly - that was the explanation proffered at the time. They have since changed the head gasket material and I am quite sure that the coolant that is used in 150 engines is more cerise than the redish of earlier models so maybe that has changed in production too. A head gasket is a fairly inert thing once it is clamped up by the head so I doubt any change in compression from carbon could be significant enough to lead to failure There are two known issues that cause head gasket failure on the AD engines 1. Gasket failure due to faulty materials used in the gasket construction recognised and
  8. Exactly - that was the explanation proffered at the time. They have since changed the head gasket material and I am quite sure that the coolant that is used in 150 engines is more cerise than the redish of earlier models so maybe that has changed in production too. A head gasket is a fairly inert thing once it is clamped up by the head so I doubt any change in compression from carbon could be significant enough to lead to failure I agree. Increased compression would likely not cause it, but detonation can and one can lead to the other. For the potential effects of detonation on head gaskets i
  9. I read anchorman's post and it does explain some of the history; thanks for repeating it; but head gasket failure would ordinarily be caused by overheating (not likely the cause in this case, from what I have read) or detonation, which is a much more likely candidate given the carbon clogging. The increased pressure would be looking for the weakest link, which would either be down past the rings or the head gasket, which could feasibly weaken over time (the route via the rings could lead to more oil consumption). The EGR issue could make things much worse in this scenario as the ECU may believ
  10. Only Toyota know for sure, but I spent some time thinking about it when I had the T180. Toyota have stated that 'carbon clogging' indicates a problem in the bulletin, and I would speculate that it's either scoring of the cylinders or carbon deposit build-up on the pistons that causes premature wearing of the rings, leading to excessive oil consumption or head gasket failure in the case of the latter. It's likely a combination issue, which is why engines were failing with the dealer rebuild, and merely replacing pistons and rings won't fix every issue; I don't buy the 'it's too complex for our
  11. I might be tempted to argue that you booked it in within the warranty period - presumably you phoned up a few days before?
  12. Toyota have a really comprehensive document to work through for P2002, which includes checking the pipework (it has been posted around these parts somewhere). It may be worth confirming that they have worked through the procedure.
  13. sonixtorm

    T180 Mpg

    I have owned a lot of cars over the years and our T180 remains the only one that stubbornly refused to respond to careful driving with much better fuel consumption. Driven without too much concern on a mixture of roads, it delivered ~30mpg - with a featherlight touch on the motorway I'd be lucky to see 32mpg. Ours didn't have the replacement engine, which could have been a factor.
  14. It seems possible/likely to me that the 2AD issues are caused by carbon build up on the pistons, and consequential damage to rings or head gasket. Anyone who has ever seen an EGR valve on one of these cars will know how much carbon gets pushed back through the cylinders when the EGR valve opens. For the longevity of the engine (rather than the environment), the best place for this carbon is likely to be down the exhaust, which blanking ensures. Note that this is just an idle musing based on my (somewhat limited) understanding of the mechanics. Please do not take it as advice to modify your car
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