Sign in to follow this  
anchorman

Renew Timing Belt

Recommended Posts

Difficulty - Hard

Time - about 6 hours working over a pit in a well lit garage. It can be done outside over ramps if you choose a nice day and take suitable safety precautions.

Tools required - After lifting and securing the vehicle you need a selection of spanners and sockets, a suitable light and various pliers and screwdrivers. We used a genuine Toyota timing belt which is available at a discounted price from Lindop Bros. Pm Parts-King for details. The mileage on this car was less than 60k but we had reached the 5 year period. You will see that the serpentine and alternator belt are in perfect condition but if this were the second belt change at 10 years or 120k miles I would change them as a matter of course. They need a visual inspection at every 1 year or 10k miles service.

Introduction

The 2.0 litre D4D engine in the RAV 4.2 has a belt driven camshaft with a service interval of 5 years or 60k miles. Don't take any chances with this if you have reached any of the time limits or if you have acquired the vehicle with no previous history as the engine will be wrecked if the belt breaks. Its not an easy job by any means as you have to work in a very restricted space but with labour rates as they are, providing you take your time and make sure you check everything there is no reason why you shouldn't have a go if you have a reasonable amount of practical experience. If you are a novice then it would be prudent to get some help or take it on the chin and pay for a garage to do it.

Method

I am breaking this down into bite size modules.

1. Preparation

overpit.jpg

As you can see in this photo the car and the owner are ready for action. Some of you will know him as Wollaston - the fully qualified lady's hair dresser with his birthday on Christmas day (definitely no relation to you know who!). We have positioned the car with the pulley side over the pit and lifted one wheel on a trolley jack and axle stand. This allows us at a later stage to turn the engine by engaging 5th gear while looking at the timing marks. If you are working off ramps you will have to turn the engine with a spanner when the time comes.

Here I am removing the screws and trim clips to remove the wheel arch cover;

liner.jpg

To make access easier, undo the brackets from the ABS pump;

abspump.jpg

Follow the brake pipes along the inner wing towards the bulkhead and you will see 2 clips. Undo these clips and now there is enough flex in the brake pipes to lift the ABS unit up and to the side to give more access for working and to get at the engine mounting bracket later.

Now you are ready to start with the

Serpentine belt.

Working under the car, look up and you will see the tensioner right at the front near the radiator. This is arguably the fiddliest part of the job as you have to undo the lock nut (blue arrow) in the centre of the pulley and then undo that tensioner bolt (green oval) or "jockey" adjuster to wind the tension off the belt.

serptensioner.jpg

I carefully lubricated the adjuster bolt with WD40 (don't squirt it all over the belt) then used a slightly stepped ring spanner for the lock nut in the middle of the pulley and managed to get a ratchet ring spanner to start the adjuster but soon managed to turn it with my fingers.

serptensionerundo.jpg

Only back it off far enough to be able to manoeuvre the belt off the pulleys. Mark the belt with chalk to show the direction of rotation and if there are any cracks or splits bin it trust me you don't want to do this at the side of the road!

Upper timing belt cover

Use long nose pliers to gently squeeze the clips that hold the wiring loom to the cover and ease them forward (circled) then remove the 10mm head bolts and remove the cover it is a fiddle. I tried to get Wollaston to wax his arms for the photo but "no". This cover is a tight fit and you may find it easier to remove the engine mounting bracket first as shown below.

toptimingcover.jpg

Alternator belt

This is the second poly-v belt and is delightfully easy to remove. Just get a 14mm spanner and ease down on the spring loaded centre bolt and pop the belt off. Mark the D.O.R. with chalk and again if there are any signs of deterioration in the belt, bin it. Although this is easy to get off, don't forget the serpentine belt has to come off first.

altbelt.jpg

Lower timing belt cover.

Fairly straight forward but you will have to remove the spring loaded tensioner for the alternator belt. Just turn the centre bolt anti-clockwise and the pulley pops right off.

Engine Mounting Bracket.

I used a scissor jack and a block of wood to support the engine. Working from the top, use a deep socket to undo the upward facing bolt then go underneath and undo the other two.

enginemount.jpg

You can then undo the hydraulic engine mounting off the inner wing and wriggle that up and out. There are then six bolts in the bracket which hold it on of which the front two (17mm) go through the power steering pump. They are tight and awkward to get at. In this photo you can see a way of locking two spanners together to get some more purchase.

pspump.jpg

It isn't the best use of tools but it works. Take the remaining bolts out of the pump and slide it up and off the bracket.

Now to remove the bracket, lift the engine by an inch or so and then get an assistant to lift the ABS pump well up out of the way while you manoeuvre the bracket out through the top.

You are now ready to remove the timing belt which is shown in this pdf. Although it describes the process, it probably assumes that the engine doesn't have a car wrapped around it which is why I have described the items additionally;

Timing belt 4.2.pdf

Timing belt insp 4.2.pdf

Timing belt rep 4.2.pdf

We didn't bother removing the glow plugs. Remove the crankshaft bolt with a 22mm socket. I used a long breaker bar and got Wollaston to sit inside with the car in gear and his foot on the brake. With 5th gear still selected, I then turned the elevated wheel to bring the engine timing marks around to the positions shown in the pdf. If you can't see them very well, highlight them with tipex or touch up paint. Undo the two bolts in the tensioner body and allow it to swing to one side and slacken the belt. When the belt is off, check all the pulleys and water pump. It isn't necessary to change any of the pulleys unless they make a noise when you spin them or the water pump unless it feels rough or it shows signs of weeping. NOTE; It is not necessary to remove any of the timing toothed pulleys as shown, this is for engine overhaul purposes only. There are kits available which include the belt and all the main pulleys and a tensioner. Don't take risks as the engine will be wrecked if the belt breaks or comes off. The warning at the beginning of the pdf refers to turning the engine while the belt is off. Doing so risks the pistons contacting the valves and bending them so the simple advice is don't turn anything with the belt off. Take the tensioner to the vice and providing there are no signs of leaking or damage, carefully press the plunger in until you can insert an allen key or pop rivet in to restrain it. Insert it just far enough to restrain the plunger as it is very hard to remove under the extreme tension. When you are ready to fit the new belt, do it in the order shown and try to avoid any slack between the pulleys as you go. This is easier said than done and took me two attempts to get it right. When the belt is on carefully check the timing marks to see they haven't moved. If they have all you can do is take it off and try again but if you envisage where the belt would be if it were a tooth out you will see it will be obvious. If this takes you all day, you must get it right as the camshaft or fuel pump being one tooth out will at best cause it to run really rough. When you are satisfied you have it right, insert the bottom bolt in the tensioner and then turn it until the top one lines up and fit that too. Tighten the two bolts and then pull out the pin that you fitted in the vice it is very tight and you may need a blood transfusion when you have finished knocking your knuckles about! When the belt is tensioned you need to rotate the wheel to turn the engine or if you are working off ramps temporarily install the crankshaft bolt. Don't forget that little dished washer with the lip facing outwards. Turn the engine CLOCKWISE twice to allow the belt to settle then check those timing marks again. When you are satisfied everything is OK you can start to build it back up. Clean all the parts and add a drop of Oil to the threads of all the bolts. With all these components, fit all of the bolts first then tighten them. Loosely fix the engine mounting bracket to the engine and then securely tighten them. Lower the engine and then wriggle that engine mounting back in and fit the bolts through the engine mounting bracket. Fit the lower and upper covers, the crankshaft pulley and the belts in reverse order. Note the D.O.R. of the belts and for the serpentine belt it should be firm but you should be able to twist it by near enough 90 degrees on the longest run between pulleys. Refit the ABS pump and the pipe clips then check everything again. Once you are satisfied everything is in place and tight you can start it up. If it whines, you probably have the serpentine belt too tight so check and adjust if necessary.

Checking the belts;

4.2 serp insp.pdf

Serpentine drive belt inspection AC-4.pdf

alt belt.pdf

http://www.toyotaown...&attach_id=7007

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's not Wollaston - Can't fool me - not enough sawdust in his hair! ;).

What can I say about the post? Nothing more than I expect really! :P

Oh, OK, it's very, very, very, good! as usual! :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My service booklet says on p22 "Additonal replacements

Timing belt (2.0 D4D engines only) Every 70 000 miles "

What was the source of "The 2.0 litre D4D engine in the RAV 4.2 has a belt driven camshaft with a service interval of 5 years or 60k miles." , please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My service booklet says on p22 "Additonal replacements

Timing belt (2.0 D4D engines only) Every 70 000 miles "

What was the source of "The 2.0 litre D4D engine in the RAV 4.2 has a belt driven camshaft with a service interval of 5 years or 60k miles." , please?

http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_id=7007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the great Info + the PDF' s ...a great help.

Regards.

trm1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had mine done by Mr T at 60000k and assuming I still own the RAV at 120000k I'll have it done again.

Would a competent local garage be able to do this given that they may never have changed a belt on a RAV, or it is safer, if more expensive to leave it to Mr T?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A decent indie should be more than capable of doing it. Some car belts are far more complicated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the neat job. Really helped me doing this on my Avensis.

Took me 9 hours :disgust: !

All the best,

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for putting this up im going at my 2002 D4D Rav4 in the morning!

She is at 120400 miles, had the 1st belt change at 59k (by Mr T, by previous owner) but only the belt, so this time i'm replacing the idler / tensioner pulleys as well as the tensioner piston and waterpump, given they are all original and @ 120k! (i love Toyota engineering).

Just bought Blue Print timing belt kit, Tensioner, alt belt, PS/AC belt & waterpump from my local motor factors (used to work with them so assuming i got really good trade prices) for €300 inc vat. I hunted on ebay for a while but i think this price is reasonable and at least they are on the doorstep and keeps things local! I all ready have red antifreeze in my workshop so thats not included in the price.

Unless i get stuck tomorrow, the only thing im wondering is the time you stated the job will take? Autodata give a 2.4 hr time (excluding changing the waterpump) but you give 6? I work for myself mainly welding cars and have done a few timing belt changes over the years, and having reviewed both the Autodata step by step guide and your own, this doesnt look to be too difficult (unless you come across the one bolt that takes 4 hrs to remove of course!).

Is there anything that ireally need to be aware of that will push the time limit? I ask as i know a Toyota mechanic who will fit this lot for me for €150 (which is a fair price for 2.4 hrs work, but in the current economic climate i would rather do myself and put the €150 towards getting two new rear tyres.

Ill update once all is done, along with the time taken. Thanks again for the guide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the club.

Best sun glasses I've ever seen.

We have lots of owners that range in mechanicing skills from "rather wouldn't try dipping the Oil" to will do much braver things than me while lay out on a windswept rainy drive and I'm fully qualified - I wouldn't have a go at mauling an engine out on a drive when some of these guys will and do!

I guess I added some additional time for getting the car set up on blocks and jacks etc and add a bit for good measure. Some of these timings are done in pure time and motion study and make no allowances for a vehicle in a fully equiped workshop with wheel free lifts etc. I must admit I work at a pace I am comfortable with and being human stop for the odd brew and watering of the horse etc. I also have a good "set to" and clean all the parts - I clean all the bolts up on the wire wheel and Oil them all in true old fashioned apprenticeship style and I find it pays in the time it all goes back nicely and getting it apart again in future.

You might make some gains on the suggested time but I think it will be a good half a day. If you get chance, photograph the additional work for the water pump and pulleys and I will add them to the post and credit you for it.

I think I've mentioned where to be careful but you have a bit more to do so take care.

Regards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I'll second what Don says :) I have yet to find the bonnet release thingy, if it is important I'm sure a light will flash at me, fortunately I stopped smoking a good few years back, it was getting expensive getting the dealer to empty the ashtray :)

Gus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Don & Gus!

Yes i will take a few pics if possible, its supposed to be -1 in the morning and my garage is like a freezer but if i dont do it tomorrow it will have to be put off till the weekend (when i cant get any parts delivered). Ican see me lighting the gas BBQ to warm up the garage.

Don your style of work is just like mine, i believe in taking my time and being meticulous and thorough rather than tearing into it like i know some lads would. The wife is always asking "how long will this take" and then is moaning when a 3 hour job turns into 10!

Gus, you sound like a mechanics dream customer....must look up Autodata scheduled times for pricing up a call out to empty ashtrays lol.

As for the sunglasses, yup they are my totally automatic Welsh bins, comes available in all four nations but as i'm a Welding Welshman living in Ireland i saw these online and had to get them. (www.paraweld.com do these themed autodarkening welding lids if any members are wondering, around £70).

I will be taking my time and will try todocument the extra work involved in changing the water pump, there is actually nothing wrong with it but i know its false economy to leave it there with 120k miles on it, same with the tensioner piston.

Thanks for the welcome will update when i can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that was fun....NOT

Finally, after two whole days (time management lol) my Rav is back on the road, with only an hour to spare before the wife needed it for work!

Changed the Timing belt, pulley, tensioner, hydraulic piston, water pump, alt belt, and threw in a fuel filter for good measure.

Now some say it only takes a few hours, in fact a few buddies of mine would of done a few avensis in their day, but a SWB Rav 4 with P/S, A/C & ABS all crowded around the area you want to work in means a lot of stripping.

Did start with intentions to photo and document the water pump process, but that fell by the wayside as I wrestled with the incredibly inaccessible bolts and nuts!

Two most infuriating were having to take off the metal cradle that holds the P/s bottle, before being able to access the P/S belt tensioner centre bolt, before releasing the wind back bolt that adjusts the tensioner!!! Not fun, suppose the cold weather didn't help either.

The other git of a nut was the inner fuel injector pump locating one, that secures it to the side of the water pump! I nearly ripped out all my injector pipes and rail to get access! (can only be achieved with 3/8 wobble extension and pray the nut isn't dead tight!).

The Toyota timing belt was in fine shape for a 61k / 5 yr old belt, but the original water pump @ 120k was on its last legs, signs of slight weeping and a horrible grating noise when spinning it meant at least the last two days of being frozen, lack of sleep, shouted at (why don't you pay a garage to do this) skinned knuckles and one chewed thumb ( note to oneself don't hold the rear of a bracket with fingers when undoing the bolt with an air ratchet...).

It's a mammoth job, but seeing the wife drive off down the road knowing that I've achieved what I've been afraid of doing for so long, along with saving myself at least a few hundred means that as I type this and sip my night cap of 43 (it's Spanish) I gave a smile on my face!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tricky 'int it Wyn! What do you reckon to the Autodata timings?

Useful info about the injector pipes. It says in the manual to remove them and I couldn't see why but now you say they are in the way it makes sense. The knuckles will mend and the hypothermia will subside. There is a big advantage in all that struggling - you know what you have done and that no garage has charged you for cobbling. You are a hero for doing it this side of April as well!!!

I've got it all coming next year on that black one in the tutorial and as it is the second belt I will do all the pulleys and the pump. Don't worry about the photos, I will top them up then.

Well done buddy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Don, I've always done my own mechanics (mainly out of cost but also have a genuine love for working on cars), and have done plenty of cam belts on older cars over the years, but always petrol and never on something that looks as daunting as a Rav4 engine bay! I used to rally the old Ae-86 twin cams and that was a dream to dismantle and rebuild, but the Rav is certainly well packed together.

You probably know this already but a tip for anyone else going at this topic is make sure you have 10, 12,14 & 17mm swan neck spanners! Most of the hard to reach bolts are in areas a socket and wrench or a flat spanner can't access!

Also an easy way of taking off the alt belt is put a spanner on the centre nut of the pulley and move clockwise all the way, the belt slips off easy from the tensioner pulley.

Thanks for the encouragement, time for sleep!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 Hours in January, in the cold, on the drive on ramps! One of the more difficult things I have done, not technically, but just due to lack of access. One thing I should mention and is not clear in the instructions is that you will need to remove the camshaft pulley after both serpentine and drive belt are removed. You will need a puller for this, and it has to be done before the lower timing cover is removed. In fact, the sooner you can get it off the better as it really helps open things up in there.

Changed the tensioner pulleys as they were a bit wobbly, but luckily the water pump was still smooth and quiet, so I passed on draining the system to change it despite having one sat there next to me - after all this was already taking longer than hoped and it was getting cold and dark!

I will update this with torque settings in due course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience of changing the timing belt, I have slightly modified the instructions from above (sorry Anchorman, hope you don’t mind). All the photos relate as per the previous instructions so I have not repeated them here.

Tools I used:

Spanners – straight, ring, stepped (swan neck), ratchets, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm

Sockets (1/2 inch and 1/4 inch) 10mm, 12mm, 14mm (long and short), 17mm, 22mm, Bar and adaptor.

Long Nose Pliers

Three legged bearing puller

Club Hammer (to jolt a nut undone)

Jack

Selection of 4x4 inch posts and wooden spreader boards (under sump to lift engine)

Ramps

Wheel chocks

Magnetic pick up tool!

Enamel touch up paint (to mark timing marks and belt)

Extending wheel brace (to undo Camshaft Bolt)

Torque Wrench

Oil / Copper Grease

Thread lock

Torch and good lighting

Long flat screwdriver (to ease things off)

Epoxy glue to repair the foam seal around the upper timing belt cover

To start.

To make access easier, undo the brackets from the ABS pump. Follow the brake pipes along the inner wing towards the bulkhead and you will see 2 clips. Unbolt the top clip and ease the pipes from the bottom clip (no point in removing the bottom bolt as it won’t help!) Now there is enough flex in the brake pipes to lift the ABS unit up and to the side to give more access for working and to get at the engine mounting bracket later. (Despite following the procedure here, my pump would not shift out of the way without bending a brake pipe, so I made do with an inch or so of movement – which helped).

Carefully lift the PAS bottle from its mount being careful not to loose the metal clip behind it.

Serpentine belt.
Working under the car, look up and you will see the tensioner right at the front near the radiator. With a ring spanner, undo the lock nut (blue arrow) in the centre of the pulley and then lubricate and undo (anticlockwise) that tensioner bolt (green oval) or "jockey" adjuster to wind the tension off the belt (small socket or ratchet spanner).
Only back it off far enough to be able to manoeuvre the belt off the pulleys. Mark the belt with chalk to show the direction of rotation and if there are any cracks or splits bin it – trust me you don't want to do this at the side of the road!

Upper timing belt cover
Use long nose pliers to gently squeeze the clips that hold the wiring loom to the cover and ease them forward (circled) then remove the 10mm bolt heads and remove the cover – it is a fiddle and there are a couple of hidden bolts, one in the middle of the cover in a recess and one down the left side near the bottom of the cover. This cover is a tight fit and you may find it easier to remove the engine mounting bracket first (two nuts underneath engine and one on top, plus three bolts holding the mount to the wing. The top nut will require a deep socket). You may need to jack up the engine an inch or so to remove the mount through the top past the ABS unit.

Alternator belt
This is the second poly-v belt and is delightfully easy to remove. Just get a 14mm spanner and ease down on the spring loaded centre bolt and pop the belt off. Mark the D.O.R. with chalk and again if there are any signs of deterioration in the belt, bin it. Although this is easy to get off, don't forget the serpentine belt has to come off first.

Lower timing belt cover.
Fairly straight forward but you will have to remove the spring loaded tensioner for the alternator belt. Just turn the centre bolt anti-clockwise and the pulley pops right off. With the car in 5th gear and handbrake on undo the camshaft pulley bolt, then when loosened use a bearing puller to carefully ease the pulley off the shaft revealing two more 10mm bolts to the lower timing cover.

Centre cover.
There are six bolts in the bracket which hold it on of which the front two (17mm) go through the power steering pump. They are tight and awkward to get at. In this photo you can see a way of locking two spanners together to get some more purchase, alternatively use a socket and bar for the top one and a spanner for the lower one.
It isn't the best use of tools but it works. Take the remaining bolts out of the pump and slide it up and off the bracket.

Timing belt.
We didn't bother removing the glow plugs. With the car out of gear, turn the upper right pulley to bring the engine timing marks around to the positions shown in the pdf. If you can't see them very well, highlight them with tipex or touch up paint. It may be worth at this point marking the two upper pulleys and belt at specific points, counting the exact number of teeth on the belt between the two markings. I say this as the upper left pulleys timing mark is very difficult to see in the limited space. Undo the two bolts in the tensioner body and allow it to swing to one side and slacken the belt. When the belt is off, (you can wriggle it around the timing belt guide bolt under the top left pulley) check all the pulleys and water pump. It isn't necessary to change any of the pulleys unless they make a noise when you spin them or the water pump unless it feels rough or it shows signs of weeping. NOTE; It is not necessary to remove any of the timing toothed pulleys as shown, this is for engine overhaul purposes only. There are kits available which include the belt and all the main pulleys and a tensioner. Don't take risks as the engine will be wrecked if the belt breaks or comes off. The warning at the beginning of the pdf refers to turning the engine while the belt is off. Doing so risks the pistons contacting the valves and bending them so the simple advice is don't turn anything with the belt off. Take the tensioner to the vice and providing there are no signs of leaking or damage, carefully press the plunger in until you can insert an allen key or pop rivet in to restrain it (keep the plunger upright or horizontal, never upside down). Insert it just far enough to restrain the plunger as it is very hard to remove under the extreme tension. When you are ready to fit the new belt, do it in the order shown and try to avoid any slack between the pulleys as you go. This is easier said than done and took me two attempts to get it right. When the belt is on carefully check the timing marks to see they haven't moved. The lower camshaft pulley has a tiny pin ubik indentation on the timing mark which correlates to the clear line on the engine block. You can see this if you squeeze your head up from below. If they have moved all you can do is take it off and try again but if you envisage where the belt would be if it were a tooth out you will see it will be obvious. If this takes you all day, you must get it right as the camshaft or fuel pump being one tooth out will at best cause it to run really rough. This is where your teeth counting exercise from earlier may come in useful on the upper pulleys. The upper timing mark (top right pulley) is easy to spot but due to the angle you will be looking at it from, just double check it lines up with a right angled hex key held against the two markings. When you are satisfied you have it right, insert the bottom bolt in the tensioner and then turn it until the top one lines up and fit that too. Tighten the two bolts (don’t overdo them – torque settings below!) and then pull out the pin that you fitted in the vice – it is very tight and you may need a blood transfusion when you have finished knocking your knuckles about! When the belt is tensioned you need to rotate the wheel to turn the engine or if you are working off ramps temporarily install the crankshaft bolt. Don't forget that little dished washer with the lip facing outwards. Turn the engine CLOCKWISE twice to allow the belt to settle then check those timing marks again. When you are satisfied everything is OK you can start to build it back up. Clean all the parts and add a drop of Oil to the threads of all the bolts. With all these components, fit all of the bolts first then tighten them – especially important with the centre cover. Loosely fix the engine mounting bracket to the engine and then securely tighten them. Lower the engine and then wriggle that engine mounting back in and fit the bolts through the engine mounting bracket. Fit the lower and upper covers, the crankshaft pulley and the belts in reverse order. Note the D.O.R. of the belts and for the serpentine belt it should be firm but you should be able to twist it by near enough 90 degrees on the longest run between pulleys. Refit the ABS pump and the pipe clips then check everything again. Once you are satisfied everything is in place and tight you can start it up. If it whines, you probably have the serpentine belt too tight so check and adjust if necessary.

Torque Settings:

Lower untoothed timing belt pulley (idler roller) 47Nm

Water Pump bolts 31Nm

Camshaft Bolt 103 Nm

Timing tensioner pulley assembly (8mm Hex key) 35Nm

Timing tensioner bolts 21Nm

Timing belt guide bolt (if removed) 9Nm

Centre timing cover 14mm bolts 37Nm

Centre timing cover 17mm bolts 64Nm

10mm Upper timing cover bolts 7Nm

10mm Lower timing cover bolts 4Nm

Auxillary belt tensioner pulley fixing bolt 40Nm

It may be worth noting that the SKF timing belt kits come with good instructions, diagrams and torque settings. Unfortunately the instructions are copyrighted so I can’t post them here.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent description. Just being pedantic but the reference to camshaft bolt in a couple of places + the torque list should read crankshaft. The ABS pump bracket bolts are usually seized and shear easily - worth giving them a dousing of penetrating Oil beforehand.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, you're correct. Should have read crankshaft. I also missed out the 8mm right angled hex key in tools required (if changing the timing tensioner pulley)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm Back!

6 months after doing the timing belt the thrust bearing in the gearbox gave up (suspect Chinese crap one that was installed 2 years earlier in converting dual mass to single).

Now just over a year later the turbo has finally let go.....only on 135,000 miles!

Ho Hum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been reading this thread with interest......I need to do my timing belt/water pump too......I have recently replaced my dual mass flywheel and clutch, this was an epic job, just due to me doing it on my own on the driveway with axel stands and Jacks......But all I can say after 3 weeks,(some waiting for parts and weather related delays) the car drives like new.....The new DMF makes all the difference....so glad I did not go with the cheaper SMF solution which was only about £150 cheaper anyway...

So yes this timing belt/water pump change seems more demanding that a DMF install????...Guess its another week or so with the car of the road......Im the same as you guys, I like to do a quality job, clean everything up etc, change everything that needs changing.....Do it once do it right, as i dont want to do it again....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys some help please,can someone tell me exactly where the camshaft pulley timing marks are please ???? obviously found the one on the pulley but where the hell is the one on the head ? many thanks Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was a great help, thank you, I took out the off side headlamp and by doing this this it gives you so much more access to the hard to get at bolts. The headlamp comes out very quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this