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  1. Something that is missing from this thread is a bit of balance. How about his? There is a place for both the 1.8, AND the 2.0. I own the latter, but have experienced both. The 1.8 is ‘adequate’ and especially suitable for the more sedate driver, who isn’t bothered about performance, and would rather save a few £, and take a more relaxed pace. That’s fine, and probably a majority of Toyota hybrid owners. The 2.0 is has much more torque, and surprising performance - contrary to some beliefs, that is relevant, especially if you drive on the motorway with a few passengers or cargo. The 2.0 is more effortless - you don’t have to dig as deep into the pedal travel, and can accelerate with traffic without even breaching the eco zone, and without the slightest movement on the Rev counter. It circumvents much of the CVT traits that frustrate people. It has a bigger battery, and motor than the 1.8. The bigger battery (alongside dynamic force tech) I’m sure, is why it’s so good on fuel. That’s a big list of benefits over the 1.8. the key here is BOTH engines are relevant, and not one size fits all.
    13 points
  2. In my previous jobs I worked for a number of component suppliers to a number of car makers - including Toyota at Burnaston. When I decided to go self-employed the car I chose to buy was as a (used) Toyota. Why? - because Toyota was my most demanding customer. Components were tested to death - and no changes, no matter how small, were allowed without very thorough testing and approval. However, problems do sometimes occur, despite the best efforts of both Toyota and their suppliers. It’s not always due to cost cutting. Rest assured that the supplier of these bushes will have been put through the wringer to resolve the issue - most probably at a large cost to the supplier - both financially and in terms of reputation. But as we all know, s…. happens. And it’s how you resolve the issue that is important.
    8 points
  3. The Yaris was given a quick wash yesterday. I used Autoglym Polar Blast, Polar Wash, Magma decontaminant and Polar Seal. Very pleased with the results.
    7 points
  4. You can service your own car, HOWEVER, proving it has been done correctly is a challenge. You must have documented evidence and be competent to do it. You won't be able to do HHC's, im my opinion, for the man in the street it's not worth it unless you are prepared to keep records
    6 points
  5. A couple of photos as it's parked right at the end of the drive - to protect from delivery guy ! ! Got 3 cars now so not much room until the Yeti finds a new home !
    6 points
  6. No, this is not a dog post. Don't have one. Nor is it natural history from a Greek island. More like observations from upon a PHEV. So, I've done a few 400 plus mile round trips in the last week. Here is what I've observed about other motorists versus the PHEV... Tesla drivers are the most sedate motorists hyper miling at 60mph in a desperate attempt to get where they need to be without having to stop off and recharge for 40 minutes somewhere. You can see the sweat beads on their heads. My neighbor just got rid of his model 3. Constant trouble and long repair times. Swapped it for a Polestar 2. Merc and BMW SUV drivers seem to have a chip on their shoulders and seem to want to show me who is boss. But as most aren't driving an AMG or M sport version I'm forced to leave them as a tiny particle in the rear view mirror. Actually, they have more chips on their shoulders than there are chips in a McCain chip factory. Fiesta, Focus, and Corsa drivers seem to have been unable to afford anything with power and seem to want to race. No point even if I were 21 again. Hyundai and Kia PHEV owners seem to look on with envy. Did I buy the wrong car? Yes you can see it in their faces. Audi drivers seem to fall into the same category as White Van Man. Completely erratic and don't give a ****. As for my car. Comfortable long drives now I got my knee pad stuck on. Adaptive cruise is excellent. LTA is terrible. Too much near side bias. Not good when big lorries take up their lane to the max and occasionally stick over a bit. Why Toyota didn't centre the car in the lane I don't know. Still, I used it for about an hour of each leg whenever the roads were quiet. Still don't like the media controls layout on the steering wheel but getting used to it. Usual rocketship acceleration has been handy as has the large boot for 'stuff' I've needed to take. One thing that does bother me is above 55mph there's a lot of wind noise. Seems to come from everywhere. Turned the stereo up to fix it. Managed to get about 54 miles from a charge by just using EV in the urban legs and in the 40 or 50mph zones in the M6 M1 road works car park. 55 quid of fuel gets me over 400 miles I think.
    6 points
  7. Hi all, done my 210k service yesterday. Nothings fancy, just an oil, filter and pollen filter change plus suspension check and undercarriage. All seems very good shape. Something with the oil that I like to share: Since my last change in February I had been using only E10 95, and about around 8500-9000 miles after that the engine started to produce a valve train noise like there is no oil there, all dried. This perhaps can happen when the car been seated for a week or more and it’s normal imo, however now this was after only 1 or 2 days without use. Only happened on the first cold start for 1 second and nothing after. Could it be because the oil has been contaminated with fuel more as a result of been using only E10, or perhaps because I was keeping it in excessive idle during the colder nights ?! We will see in the next 3 months as I am not keeping it ON anymore but continue to use E10 95 as there is no E5 99 available near me on good price. Btw I had received new batch Petronas Syntium 0w20 which is spec to the latest oil standard ILSAC -GF6A, API- SP 👍 Pictures below and comparison with previous package.
    6 points
  8. Only had my Corolla 2 months after 5 yrs with a T25 Avensis but the first things I noticed that were not apparent in the Avensis were wind noise at speed and very thin and dry leather on the steering wheel giving it a cheap feel. I found that spraying silicone lubricant onto a cloth and coating both door surround and door seals has plumped out the seals to an extent that I no longer hear the irritating wind noise at speed due to a better seal and another positive is that it should enable the seals to last longer and with less natural deterioration. The steering wheel has benefited from a good coating of leather conditioner which has improved the feel no end and it now has a more expensive and plusher feel to it.
    6 points
  9. I have a 1.8 TS hire car on loan for a couple of weeks for business and have just completed the first of two 400 mile trips. It's an interesting comparison with my 2.0. The 1.8 is older (69 plate) and has done about 30k miles. Its also pretty battered as most hire cars are these days but just wanted to post a few observations. The 1.8 obviously has quite a bit less power than the 2.0 and that is noticeable when climbing steep hills or demanding a swift overtake but what I wasn't expecting was how busy the engine is on the 1.8. Of course it may be just this car but the software seems to demand more of the engine more of the time and its often hunting up and down the rev range but most noticeable is the demand for engine braking under heavy vehicle braking. I've never noticed this on my 2.0. The 1.8 will actually increase engine speed to nearly max revs under these conditions. I guess this is to allow MG2 to dump some energy to the engine and dissipate via pumping losses instead of the battery. Other than that its obviously more economical even driven like a hire car and the engine sounds very similar although maybe the 2.0 is a bit noisier due to its direct injection when used under heavy load. Wheel and tyre wise the 1.8 has 16" wheels vs the 17" on my 2.0 and the ride is a little more compliant and the response from the car a little less direct. I do prefer the bigger wheels though because I personally think the smaller wheels look a bit lost in the wheelarches even though the rolling radius is probably the same. If I notice anything else of interest I'll post it here this time next week.
    6 points
  10. 6 points
  11. New here and only just joined. I ordered my Corolla 1.8 design in Denim Blue in mid January, expected delivery was end of May. Had a phone call a few weeks ago telling me it had gone to build. Shortly after that another call telling me delivery date. Collected it on 19th April. I'm totally new to the Toyota world but am lovely the experience so far.
    6 points
  12. I am currently driving the previous generation hybrid engines 1.8 in my 2010 Auris and I have covered over 208k miles to date with no issues at all. At 140k miles I did cleaned the egr system and looked inside the engine where the valves are and they were clean as new. These new engines seems as good or even better and I will not hesitate to buy one for myself and take it on high mileage journey. One of the reasons I don’t want to get rid of my car and buy a new one is that I want to see how far I can take a hybrid and document every failure and part replacement. The car is still on everything original (except wheel bearings and brakes) and until becoming uneconomical to repair I will keep it on the road. Toyota does good cars indeed. 👌
    6 points
  13. Well after a lot of measuring and reading endless reviews I have managed to do what I suspected was impossible, I now have two bikes I can get into the back if an Aygo at the same time. Of course the bikes are the folding type and the rear seats have to go down but I can get two 20" wheel bikes, plus helmets, a boot tidy box (now between the front and back seats), pannier bags for each bike and still enough room to get a carrier bag of shopping in. I have to admit that, even with careful measuring it was a lot tighter than I thought so much so I wondered if it could be done at all at one point. Having got them in and out a few times now I seem to have found the technique. Being careful with placement I have managed to add a basic bike computer (GPS so there are no cables, sensors or magnets involved) and LED lights to each bike even though there is also a twist lever for the seven speed gears and a bell already attached the the handlebars.
    5 points
  14. TBH none of the hybrids have had any major recurring/common issues that I've seen in my time here (Except maybe the 12v battery thing, but IMHO that is less a problem with the car than the owner not using the car enough! ); Heck we still have people with the original Mk2 Prius still on their original traction battery - That's nearly 20 years old! And NiMH, not lithium! I doubt any EV battery will last that long and still be usable. One thing to remember with the hybrids is having two motors mean they can both support each other - They probably get half the wear that they would have if they were on their own, and that contributes to their longevity. The hybrids consistently score highly in reliability charts, even beating out most EVs!
    5 points
  15. It seems that this discussion is very partisan. One one side you have owners of the 1.8 assuring us that it is perfectly powerful and keeps up with the traffic flow without difficulty (one recent poster confirming that he had ample power on his motorway trip earlier this evening although on his own admission spent the majority of his journey in L1 at 60mph). On the other side of the argument the defenders of the 2.0 is better argument talk about long motorway trips perhaps heavily laden and climbing hills etc. Surely it’s simply horses for courses rather than one type being better than the other. If you want excellent fuel efficiency then maybe you would be better off looking at the 1.8, or for example if you need the maximum amount of boot space. Conversely if you carry more load and are willing to sacrifice some fuel efficiency then maybe the 2.0 is the better bet. It’s great that Toyota gives us the choices.
    5 points
  16. It does show a difference in culture between a japanese horn and, say, a german one. Definitely more of a polite "Pardon me sir" than a "GET THE F*** OUT THE WAY YOU **$&$%& *%$£& OR I'LL &$"$%$£ YOUR WHOLE FAMILY!" I sometimes feel I need a variety of horns for different situations, e.g. "Hello is anyone on the other side of this single-lane blind corner??" and "Excuse me fellow driver but the lights have changed!" and "Pardon me fellow driver but if you could pull forwards just a touch I'll be able to get past you into this left turn" and the always useful "I'M RIGHT HERE USE YOUR *$£#@#%£ EYES INSTEAD OF TURNING INTO THE SIDE OF ME WITHOUT LOOKING YOU BLIND **$%&$* IT'S MIRROR SIGNAL MANOEUVRE YOU IGNORANT #@+=$£&!!"
    5 points
  17. I've tried it a few times in the past 4 weeks that i've had my car and i love it. I have to force myself to go back to normal. My advice, don't try it.. 😂
    5 points
  18. As Kingo said as long as you use the recommended oils and filters then you can service the car yourself and if ever an issue arose regarding the lubrication system then Toyota can see that a Toyota oil filter has been used and if required can lab test the oil to check it conforms to their specification. As long as the oil filter is not hanging off and the work has been done competently then you are o.k. I am a competent home mechanic and intend to keep this car for 10 years or more until electric cars are cheaper and better catered for for charging etc. As such I did a 1500 mile oil change to eliminate any chance of recirculation of swarf particles which are produced by any new engine and hopefully picked up by the oil filter and retained there until the first service. I am a bit "old school" and remember the need to do a 1000 mile oil change with new cars when engineering tolerances were nowhere near as good as they are today. So I am just being cautious and for the sake of £55 quid in parts giving myself peace of mind and hopefully greater longevity with the engine. Access to the oil filter and sump plug is very easy and for those interested the factory fitted oil filter for the 2.0L car is 90915-CA004, but I believe you can also use 90915-YZZM3 which I think is the Lexus equivalent used in this engine. Oil required is Toyota genuine 0W16 and it takes 4.3L with a filter change.
    5 points
  19. Why is it slower? My 1.8 can still reach the legal speed limits. And it only gets (slightly) noisy if the nut behind the wheel floors the accelerator - something which is rarely ever needed. The impact on most journey times of more power is minimal to non-existent. Who cares if you save one minute off a typical commute? And in rush hour you'd probably struggle to do that consistently due to the vagaries of congestion at one or both ends. You can make better progress through skill and finesse. Understanding how the traffic is flowing around you and timing your approaches to junctions. In my experience those are skills that the 'power users' tend to lack. Probably because the extra power on tap makes them lazy. But to fair 68.9mpg from a 2.0 version is very, very good. I'd be intrigued to know how you've managed that given that it would be uncommonly high even for a 1.8. The only time I've seen that or better was on very long journeys at a steady 60mph. Still - however you did achieve it we can be pretty certain that if you'd driven a 1.8 the same way on the same journey it would likely return a figure in the mid 70s 😉
    5 points
  20. The eco gauge is available on the instrument panel screen
    5 points
  21. Brief update, new alternator fitted, and no parasitic power drain. All OK again.
    5 points
  22. 2,560 miles since last filling with petrol. Took 34.18 litres to fill the tank. If only electricity was free 😀....................
    5 points
  23. Well had our Corolla now for 3 weeks and I must say we absolutely love the car, the re search before hand has paid off to find a car that is great to drive and fun and doesn't look mundane and boring. We have done a fair bit of varied driving and the car is great at tweaking my driving style to obtain the most from its performance and economy. The only niggles we have is the constant having to sign in to the connected services, and a sqeak/ creak from drivers seat which was sorted by fully reclining the seat and then reverting back. The 2.0 litre gives me a great combination of performance and economy and I reckon my Impreza mate for the past 13 years would be happy with the new wheels.
    5 points
  24. The 1.8 has ample power for me and I've never felt the need for more. Possibly it takes more skill to make up for the power difference but that doesn't bother me. I also rarely feel the need to drive fast. Most of the time it doesn't significantly affect the journey time anyway. I've just come back from a vacation in North Wales. At no point did I feel a lack of power despite the Welsh hills. Nor did my 1.8 have any problems keeping up with other vehicles in the outside lane of the motorway - you just have to be prepared to actually press the accelerator all the way down - which is after all why Toyota gave us that much pedal travel and allowed the engine to reach those RPM. The 2.0 probably feels more refined at high speeds on the motorway but apart from one brief section where I was trying to get past Birmingham before rush hour I was happy to sit in lane one and bimble along at 60 mph. As for MPG: 190 miles driving up north and another 100 miles driving to various golf courses - 67 mpg according to the dash, 59 mpg pump to pump (but different pumps). 190 miles back down - dash is currently showing 68 mpg.
    5 points
  25. I’m surprised you found them identical to drive. I own the 2.0, and have driven both the earlier and current 1.8s. BIG DIFFERENCE in the way they both drive - the 1.8 revs with the slightest throttle inputs, the 2.0 can rely on torque alone within the Eco band. The 2.0 is surprisingly quick when you floor the throttle, and is generally much more effortless to drive - as you would expect with around 60bhp more.
    5 points
  26. Further update on Yaris Hybrid MPG, on the most recent check on mpg the Yaris Hybrid churned out 71.45mpg. Considering it was a mixture of short and long runs on twisting hilly roads in Donegal and Mayo and fully loaded for over half of the mileage covered, really pleased with that. So I’m sure I’ll get a little bit more mpg as the weather warms up.
    5 points
  27. Collected my 2.0 Excel HB with Pan Roof today, absolutely lovely car to drive and it’s beautiful in obsidian blue. There is a slight blemish on the paintwork that I will have resolved, but other than that it’s fantastic
    5 points
  28. Well one month in to the wife's Yaris Gr Sport and she loves it quiet comfy and smooth. Ok we knew it wasn't going to be anything like her previous 2.0l Tdi Scirocco but she has said she prefers to drive the Yaris mostly due to slightly elevated seating position and no blind spots unlike the Scirocco. Done a few little mods with it but that's just me, The Armster Armrest, Front Grill Gr Sport Badge, Gr Sport start button, Toyota Yaris Exhaust trim, dashcam, full spare wheel kit, and front seat pads to protect the Alcantara seats, So a happy wife = happy life lol 😊😊
    5 points
  29. Yes, the red colour is not an in-your-face red. My one is shown below. Ignore the parking angle, that was to take the photo!
    5 points
  30. Over 4 months at the processing stage for me now.. still refreshing the app twice a day (at least 😂) My car is still estimated on 24th May, hoping the app updates soon, even if just some dates in the background data..
    5 points
  31. As a 2016 Auris Excel hybrid hatchback driver for the last 13 months, I can tell you with absolute clarity that if you buy a hybrid for commuting in slow speed traffic, it’s absolutely the right tool for the job. It’s a beautiful, relaxing, smooth commute. Thoroughly recommended. Here’s mine:
    4 points
  32. The Australians (I think) have a saying: If you want to go into the outback, take a Land Rover. If you want to come back, take a Toyota.
    4 points
  33. If you get the 2.0 you almost *need* to get the TS; You can barely slide two slices of toast into the boot of the HB 2.0 I do wish Toyoa had mounted the rear seats further back in the HB Corolla and esp. the Mk4 Yaris tho' - The Yaris has such a massive boot compared to previous models I wonder if they did it for the Boot Capacity in Litres figure, whereas I'd rather have a smaller boot and more rear passenger space (Reasoning that if I need more boot space I can fold the seats down, whereas if I need more rear passenger space I can't really cut my passenger's legs off and put them in the boot...) Or better yet if they put the sliding rear seats back in all models! That was one of the best things about the Mk1 and Mk2 Yaris and I do miss it!!
    4 points
  34. It's all about the driving style Let's call it Fun 2.0L vs hmm.... how would you call the 1.8L. No word comes in my mind. I assume those with the 2L would never agree that the 1.8 is a fun car, and that is understandable. It is not!!! But the 1.8 does everything a car should do, and does it with a balanced performance and extremely good fuel consumption. Obviously mine is 1.8😂😂😂 and I am after fuel economy Both cars are great, but as the cars are different so we are. Everyone have different needs and different expectations from a car. PS. I would happily have gone for the 2L, but having in mind it would have cost me £7-800 if not even more per year I choose the wiser solution for my needs(and pocket). However if the budget wasn't an issue I would have a Lexus ES now
    4 points
  35. I couldn't agree more. To me the 1.8 and 2.0 were like chalk and cheese. No comparison, with the 2.0 winning hands down for me
    4 points
  36. So I've jock'd my way out of the ticket situation. It seems until September this year you can change the day of an advance ticket and just pay any price difference. I'll be going down on Monday for the car!! Pics to follow in another thread.
    4 points
  37. The video - now that really does wind me up! You pay God knows how much per hour for a technician wandering about with a camera thinking he's Cecil B. DeMille. Then admin to upload the video and send it to you - why? To prove they actually had your vehicle in the workshop? Grrr. In days gone by - I know, I know. Everything needed adjusting and you knew you had a service. Later, when everything auto-adjusted you only knew if it had been serviced if the mechanic left some grease on the steering wheel!
    4 points
  38. I have the 1.2 Corolla with 16" wheels and have to say the fuel consumption around town isn't great at approx 30mpg . On a trip of 40 miles , mainly A & B roads this improves to 46mpg . Motorway trips using the cruise control with the speed set to just under 70mph up to 55mpg is achievable with the motor barley audible . Would have preferred the 1.8 HSD however this would have cost approx 6K more than the discounted price that I payed for my car ( new ) and just driving 4.5K miles a year now couldn't justify the extra cost .
    4 points
  39. Rather strangely I only get noise from the offside when my wife is in the passenger seat….. 😉
    4 points
  40. I think one big difference is the 2.0 uses the M20A, one of the new 'dynamic force' engines, which can switch between Atkinson/Miller-cycle and Otto cycle, whereas the 1.8 is the tried and tested 2ZR-FXE which AFAIK is still Atkinson-cycle only. One of the biggest characteristics with the Atkinson/Miller-cycle engines vs Otto-cycle is they don't have much torque, esp. at the low end, so they need to rev higher to deliver more power. I've always guestimated the 1.8 is the equivalent of a 1.4, and the 1.5 a 1.0 in terms of the amount of air-fuel mix they suck in, but with the newer engines when they switch to Otto-cycle you get the full 1.5/2.0L of air-fuel mix - that's a significant boost! However, you also get the high fuel-usage of the Otto-cycle too and it's very noticeable! I do find when I'm keeping mine in that 2000-ish rpm sweet spot of Eco+ the engine barely sips fuel, but when I get into the Power zone the engine note changes and the fuel consumption starts to really shoot up as the engine goes to 3000rpm and beyond! The pull you get is very satisfying tho'... I've certainly felt a big difference between the M15A in my Mk4 and the 1NZ-FXE in the Mk3 in the way they deliver power and torque as you pile on the accelerator. I think it's definitely possible to get the high MPGs with the 2.0 but you have to be much more disciplined about keeping it in the high-efficiency zone than you do with the 1.8 - Even in the Mk4 I find pull you get from giving it the beans very alluring which is really hampering me from getting back into the 80's...! I try to take the advice of Hicks from Aliens - short controlled bursts! (Hmm, y'know, I hope they make a 4.1L dynamic force engine.... the M41A )
    4 points
  41. If you live in Germany and often travel on the autobahn then 2.0 is must have., but as many says in uk 1.8 is simply perfectly adequate. I found Toyota hybrids are not suitable for high speeds even with larger engines, not because of the engine power or lack of it, but because of the transmission. Even Camry or large Lexus car with big engines when at speeds over 75-80mph you ask them to go further or to keep up going uphill and they immediately feel noisier and not direct, exactly opposite of what would be the experience in petrol or diesel equivalent even from the same make and model. The idea is the bigger the engine the less rubbery feel when pushed but even then Toyota hybrids and low they are designed to work limits high speeds races. One of the reasons why journalists does not like them at all and never recommend to the public. For me these cars are the best available with ice unless high performance or high towing power is required. 👌⛽️🔋
    4 points
  42. It's all about the driving style, isn't it. If you enjoy the good start 0-60, pushing your car when joining a motorway, quick overtaking on an A road, or just accelerating quickly the 2L is the one to go. If the above isn't essential and you are a calm driver, the 1.8 will do everything the 2L does, but with the bonus of few extra MPG. As I've already mentioned somewhere - the days I used to push my car any single time are gone( years ago I had an old BMW 320 petrol 1989 year with the straight 6 cylinders which had to be driven to the limit every time - it used to do around 20mpg though, but I never cared about the petrol bill with this car ) I find mine 1.8 TS absolutely capable of everything which a car should do. It is very comfy, very relaxing to drive, quieter then my previous diesel, extremely good on fuel - my worst tank so far, measured at the station (not by the dash) was 57.5mpg. I did test drive both before I decided which one to go for and I must say I did like the 2L a bit more, but for my case the extra cost with the 2L wasn't justifiable. My test drive for both 1.8 and 2L was around 20 minutes on a motorway and both vehicles once at 70mph were absolutely the same for me. Did the motorway test, cos my commute is mainly on M3 and the 1.8 is great sitting at 70mph for hours. Well if the motorway speed limit in UK was a bit higher then the 2L is definitely the one to go if doing mainly motorway driving
    4 points
  43. A Corolla hits a tractor head on. The tractor seems to have driven over the bonnet and windscreen before it flips over. The car seems very strong and with only linited deformation.
    4 points
  44. Thanks for that, I'm not sure I have enough hands to carry out all of that so should be safe enough in the mean time..😇
    4 points
  45. Have a look at the attached re adjusting your car seat, which may help: Physiomed_Sitting_Guide_-_Driving_Digital.pdf
    4 points
  46. My humble opinion, go for petrol engine. 1,6 is weak 2,0 isn't too much boost over 1,8 -> go for 1,8 108kW, engine type 2ZR Fuel consumption of course is higher than diesel engine, but take into account, this petrol engine has no turbo, no DPF, no adblue, no EGR valve. I'm not saying that Toyota diesel engines are bad, I'm just saying that this petrol engine is simple and allegedly reliable. And still conforms with EURO6.
    4 points
  47. Tell me about it, I worked on Renault’s for 13 years, still have the scars to prove it and the nice nurse’s are just slowly reducing my medication now. 😅
    4 points
  48. TBH they don't really do anything - Just change how the car responds to accelerator input. If you take Normal as the base, consider that a 1-to-1 relationship between how much you push it and how much power you get. The others are curves that blunt/sharpen the response but they all meet at 100% anyway. Say you push the accelerator 25% - In Normal you get 25% power, in Eco you get maybe 12% and Power mode you get 50% Push it more to 50% accelerator, Normal you get 50%, Eco you get 30%, Power you get 70%. Push it all the way to 100% - All 3 give 100%. So they just change the accelerator response, but don't increase or decrease the maximum power available (At least in current models - I don't know if they will change this later!) (NB: The numbers I give here are all totally inaccurate flagrant lies, and just serve to illustrate the idea as I CBA to draw a graph)
    4 points
  49. Doh! Just realised there are two checkboxes works now it’s a sod getting older !
    4 points
  50. Just returned home after 3 days in North Wales. The journey from Barnsley South Yorks round trip was approx 340 miles on M ways and mixed A and B roads and the Yaris Cross averaged 70 mpg. which I thought was very good.
    4 points
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