Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Leaderboard

  1. FROSTYBALLS

    FROSTYBALLS

    Management


    • Points

      5,040

    • Posts

      30,178


  2. TonyHSD

    TonyHSD

    Established Member


    • Points

      3,382

    • Posts

      4,903


  3. Cyker

    Cyker

    TOC Supporter


    • Points

      2,714

    • Posts

      7,915


  4. flash22

    flash22

    Established Member


    • Points

      2,369

    • Posts

      7,682


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/15/2010 in all areas

  1. Hello, I am writing this as a form of therapy as I wait for delivery of my new Corolla. It contains little useful information and it requires no answer but feel free to comment. I have been driving for around 10 years now. I am not really a car guy in the traditional sense but I do appreciate nice cars, I love driving and I enjoy watching Formula 1. My first car was a W reg (2001) Ford Focus. It had a 1.6 naturally aspirated petrol with (mated to- as the motoring journalists like to say) a three speed auto with, wait for it... overdrive. Being 20 years old and owning an automatic was sacrilege to my friends but me being a poor student and the car being a gift from my grandad, I was in no position to feel hard done by. The car was surprisingly good for what it was albeit that it was slow and not very reliable I loved it. At that time I was driving around 20k miles per year and at 35mpg the Focus was costing too much. Introduce the 308. A couple of years later I traded in the Focus to upgrade to the Peugeot 308. It was an upgrade in every way over the focus: beige in colour, only a year and a half old and with a whopping 92 horsepower from its 1.6 litre turbo diesel. Crucially, this car had a manual transmission for more street cred and could easily achieve 70mpg on a motorway run. At this point I still knew very little about cars and pretty much went for the first one the guy at Arnold Clark showed me. I loved the 308 almost as much as I loved the focus but the relationship soured after about two years. It needed some repairs due to a rock hitting the bottom and breaking the fuel line and new brake discs at 30k miles. I thought that wasn't very long for brake discs so I started asking questions about how reliable the owner of the garage thought my 308 would be. To my horror he opined that French cars tended to have problems with electrics as they aged so I could expect things to crop up over time. I was making a decent amount of money at this point so I started shopping around for an upgrade. I was doing a lot of miles up and down the A9 which at that time still didn't have average speed cameras so it was very much whacky races and I had been in a couple of close calls when trying to overtake lorries (cars coming the other way at 95mph kind of close calls) so I wanted more overtaking punch and something a bit more comfortable. My mum had owned Volkswagens for years and swore by them and the local dealer in Inverness has a great reputation for customer service (and still does). I test drove a Ford Kuga with 180hp diesel which was lovely but noisy and expensive for what you got, a Tiguan which was nice but again , expensive for the features. I finally settled on the Golf. 2.0 litre turbo diesel. Powerful enough, economical enough and very very comfy inside. I loved the Golf just a little more than the 308 but less than the Focus. It was a semi-sensible choice for a man of 24 and my first new car purchase. I was the proud owner of a 65 plate golf Match. For most of my life I was not a Toyota fan. My first real awareness of them was in 2015 when I was getting the Golf fixed after someone ran into the back of me and smashed up the rear bumper and boot lid. The repair centre was right next to the local Toyota dealer and I had a chance to look around while burning some time. I looked at the Auris hybrid sitting in the forecourt and scoffed at the relatively stodgy interior and frumpy looks outside. I knew better than to buy a hybrid of course, as we all knew back then hybrids were only good in town and long-distance driving was much better in a diesel. Off I went secure in the knowledge that I had made a good choice in the Golf. Low and behold a few months later spawned: Dieselgate. It turned out VW had been less than up-front with its Euro 5 NOx Emissions and although my Golf was a Euro 6 I was furious with them. The news spoiled the image of VW entirely in my mind and all I had was a sour feeling of having been lied to. My life changed suddenly when I was under threat of redundancy at work so I decided to ditch the Golf on PCP. I initiated the voluntary termination and away it went. For the first time in years I did not have a car to call my own. Where I lived in the Scottish Highlands at the time public transport was utterly inadequate to get around so I borrowed my sisters VW Up! for a few months to get to and from work. I won't say too much about the Up! except to say that it was adequate as a runabout. I ended up going to back to university so for a couple of years I did not own a car as I was broke and had no real need for one. Being a lightweight car guy however, I spent a lot of time on Youtube watching Scotty Kilmer videos. Anyone who has seen Scotty Kilmer knows he has probably resulted in more Toyota Sales than all of their sales people combined over the last couple of decades. I eventually got the car bug and started shopping around for something cheap to buy and run but that had enough power and space to be comfortable and fun to drive whilst also being reliable. Under Scotty's influence I started looking at Toyotas but to my disappointment I couldn't find one that really ticked the boxes. The petrol Auris looked like an OK match but it lacked power. Eventually I compromised and went for a Honda Civic. Honda is a brand that Scotty would say isn't what it used to be but can still make decent cars. I found a 1.8 naturally aspirated Civic developing (more motoring journalism) 136 horsepower. Not quite the 150 of the Golf, but enough. The 2007 Civic Type S was an awesome machine. It had the sporty looks, the reliability and it had a cool moonroof. It also returned a surprisingly good 43 mpg without really trying; so long as you didn't rev it up to its peak at 6500rpm. Which of course you did because it only had any power at all above 4500 rpm. At that point it burned about as much oil as it did petrol but wow was it fun. Alas, like all of my cars the fun wasn't to last. I got engaged. At that point I was still doing huge mileage commuting to work and my fiance hardly drove at all so it didn't make sense for us to have two cars. Hers was on a lease which was ending and the car bug was back at me so off I went to the internet (covid restricitons were well in effect by now) and started shopping for a car. She wanted an automatic and I wanted an estate with enough power and great fuel economy from either Honda or Toyota. It turned out that automatics and fuel economy were the antithesis to each other in almost every case. Every case except the hybrids that is. With an official return of over 70mpg (on the old measurement), a CVT auto and Toyota engineering, the Auris went straight to the top of the list. I rushed down the the dealer and took it for a test drive. (the rules sill allowed those at that point) I fell in love with it instantly. It wasn't really the best in any category you threw at it but the Auris was good enough in every category. With used car sales bombing and low interest rates I picked the 2017 estate business edition hybrid for a mere £12k on PCP costing £170 per month. I am still driving it to this day and I have put 40k miles on it with but one issue with the headlights both blowing at once, apparently a common issue with these cars. It is by far the most well rounded car I have owned and I couldn't recommend it enough to someone looking for dependable and efficient driving. Over that 40k miles I have averaged about 58MPG indicated which I am very pleased about. I had been at the Toyota dealer a few times getting it serviced and the new Corollas caught my eye. Sleek, very high tech and powerful with a 180hp hybrid option. Alas at 25-30k they were way out of my PCP range so with the Auris I stuck. Until. With the easing of lockdowns and the surge in demand for microprocessors coupled to a lack of supply new car wait times increased and accordingly used car prices shot up. Having added 18 months and 40k miles to my Auris I then had a firm valuation of it at over £14k. For the first time the value of my car had appreciated and by quite a lot. It seems the car bug bit me at just the right time. I was now in a position to trade in my Auris and have a sizeable down payment on a shiny new corolla. Armed with a 3.5k Carwow discount, a deposit contribution and 0% PCP offer I ordered a 2.0 Hybrid Touring Sports in Design trim. I initially ordered the HB but cancelled it when I received a better offer on the estate making the price the same. That was on the 30th November 2021 and here I wait still. Refreshing the app twice daily to check for an update that never comes. This is my story so far.
    19 points
  2. The symptoms. The MPG is disgraceful this time last year we was averaging no less than 38mpg over a tank and around 42-45mpg when driven on a run with cruise control set at 70mph. Over Christmas we did approx 1500miles and have managed best on a run +4oc 31mpg driving with cruise control set at 70mph, when it was cold we was down to 21mpg and have now risen to around 30mpg driving like your gran going to church. These figures are a long way short of the figures that Toyota quote and of what we was achieving this time last year with similar temperatures, it may be worth noting the car makes a pinking sound at around 1800-2300rpm if you put your foot down and there is a small delay / flat spot in throttle response (not turbo lag) when you press the accelerator, I suspect this is the fly by wire throttle system but is it supposed to have a delay? How to clean, I did have to borrow a few pictures as I had cleaned mine by the time I made this thread. 1. Remove the engine cover, this just pulls up and unclips. 2. Now you can see the EGR Valve, you will need a 12mm socket, Ratchet and extension to remove this. 3. Remove these 2 x bolts 1st for the pipe above the EGR valve. 4. Now undo the other 4 x 12mm nuts and bolts from the EGR valve and unplug this from the wiring loom, this can now be removed. 5. This is now what you will find. Dirty manifold with 2 x blocked breathing holes. Dirty EGR valve with restricted air flow. 6. I cleaned these using an old toothbrush, small screw driver, carburettor cleaner, old cloth and a dyson cleaner to suck the muck out. Try to scrape and brush out the thick carbon then use the carburettor cleaner to clean the finish this off. Now once all this is cleaned out just simply refit, This took me a total of 15 minutes so I assure you this is very easy. The results This will vary for everyone but in my experience I did a 360mile round trip the next day with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, going there (more downhill) the roads where very very wet with poor visibility and approx 7oc and we averaged 41.1MPG by the time we got there. When we come home with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, slightly uphill most of the way the roads where dry and approx 3oc the average MPG had dropped to 40.0. When I filled up we got 37.4litres in the tank which I rounded up to 38 and worked out at 43MPG (I always brim the tank). This is now showing a big improvement / approx 20% for a 15minute job of cleaning the EGR valve. I will also note the slight flat spots in throttle response are a lot less than before. I would like to say a big thank you to cabcurtains for bringing the EGR valve to my attention and to twingo69 as I borrowed a few pictures from his thread to make this guide. UPDATE Ok it has been nearly 5 months and around 4k since I did this do this morning I thought I would check the EGR valve. To be honest the manifold was very very clean maybe a small less than 1mm coating of carbon and the EGR valve had a little more, I did clean this again while it was removed but in my opinion looking at what I seen today I would recommend cleaning this around every 12months or 10k. UPDATE Well over the next 12 months the MPG just continued to drop, Toyota claimed there was no problems with the car but by Feb 11 we could only manage 28-32MPG at best. I had also noticed the car had started to do a lot of DPF recycle burns and suspect the DPF was maybe on its way out, we had no warrenty left on the car so had a shop around and exchanged for a 5 month old 500 mile CRZ. What can I say but for sure the CRZ is one of the best cars we ever owned and was fantastic on fuel (49MPG average for every turn of the key over 9 months and 9000 miles) but due to the birth of Lewis we needed a bigger car so exchanged this for a CTR (FN2), I will say that so far over 7000 miles this has returned 29MPG for us which puts a quicker petrol car in the same area as the T180 when we traded this in. What never made sence was when we first bought the T180 we could get 40-44MPG no problem then at around 30'000 miles the MPG just started to drop while nothing really changed, we never found a cure for this or a fault but for sure this is problem and Toyota must know about this because they dropped the 2.2 and 2.0 Auris diesel cars and have now agreed to use BMW diesel engines from 2013. Why the worlds largest car manufacturer would need to use a BMW diesel engine is beyond me unless it shows they are struggling to get a modern diesel to be clean and efficient while being very driveable.
    19 points
  3. Well, just under 200k mark I decided to go earlier with my scheduled service instead of waiting as every next day is another big number added to the existing ones 🙃🏎🏁. Here it is what I have done to the car: 1. New engine oil and filter 2. New transmission fluid - drain and refill 3 litres 3. New spark plugs - older one looked good and easy to undo them, the trick is let the engine running for 5 min before you start , in colder weather 10min is fine. 4. New air filter and Pollen filter 5. Engine coolant 5 litres- you can do that without even taking the engine under cover, you need a 9mm ID clear tube 30cm long and an empty container, perhaps a gallon from the same stuff. , again drain and refill. Before you start set heating to max temperature and blower speed 1, and after refill set the car into maintenance mode it takes around 20-30min running and the engine coolant needs to reach 95C° and thermostat to open and both radiator fans to kick in and spin. Add coolant as necessary. 6. Inverter coolant drain ad refill, around 2 litres of coolant , again after you fill up full turn on the car and immediately turn off, go to the engine bay and top up to max. Repeat this process 3 times, set the level just above max. 7. Fit engine undercover after all checked for fluids leaks. Use new plastic clips where old one are broken, also best to replace front M6 bolts with stainless steel ones, I did that many years ago. 👌 Well that’s pretty much all. I hope for another few 000 trouble free miles🏎🏁👍 I can give torque settings, and from where to start first if anyone interested of diy car service.
    17 points
  4. Something that is missing from this thread is a bit of balance. How about his? There is a place for both the 1.8, AND the 2.0. I own the latter, but have experienced both. The 1.8 is ‘adequate’ and especially suitable for the more sedate driver, who isn’t bothered about performance, and would rather save a few £, and take a more relaxed pace. That’s fine, and probably a majority of Toyota hybrid owners. The 2.0 is has much more torque, and surprising performance - contrary to some beliefs, that is relevant, especially if you drive on the motorway with a few passengers or cargo. The 2.0 is more effortless - you don’t have to dig as deep into the pedal travel, and can accelerate with traffic without even breaching the eco zone, and without the slightest movement on the Rev counter. It circumvents much of the CVT traits that frustrate people. It has a bigger battery, and motor than the 1.8. The bigger battery (alongside dynamic force tech) I’m sure, is why it’s so good on fuel. That’s a big list of benefits over the 1.8. the key here is BOTH engines are relevant, and not one size fits all.
    14 points
  5. My new Corolla 2.0L Touring Sports Excel was delivered today. Very pleasantly surprised. Predicted to give 7/10 actually awarding 9/10 Positives? More comfortable driving position than anticipated, sports seats cuddle you! Quieter other than a little wind noise. Comfortable suspension, although will check tyre pressures. Having test driven 1.8, so glad I chose a 2.0L, more relaxed drive,more responsive. The CVT is less obvious too and only rears it's ugly head when you accelerate hard. Lots of room in the boot, like the red trim. Headroom is not as restricted by the panoramic sun roof as I thought. Controls are logical. Negatives? MY21.5 not MY22. The labelling on the buttons poor, need a torch to read them! Went to get more petrol and realised I did not know how to open the fuel cap!! Had to look it up on the internet.
    12 points
  6. Just picked up the car today. Lounge edition, only option not added was the nav. Got it as a pre registered therefore a very good price. Only took me the best part of a year to decide what to buy😁
    12 points
  7. In my previous jobs I worked for a number of component suppliers to a number of car makers - including Toyota at Burnaston. When I decided to go self-employed the car I chose to buy was as a (used) Toyota. Why? - because Toyota was my most demanding customer. Components were tested to death - and no changes, no matter how small, were allowed without very thorough testing and approval. However, problems do sometimes occur, despite the best efforts of both Toyota and their suppliers. It’s not always due to cost cutting. Rest assured that the supplier of these bushes will have been put through the wringer to resolve the issue - most probably at a large cost to the supplier - both financially and in terms of reputation. But as we all know, s…. happens. And it’s how you resolve the issue that is important.
    11 points
  8. I would like to share my mpg figures with the forum as I keep a record of all tank to tank fill ups that I have done over the first 6000 miles from new. Firstly I keep the vehicle setting in normal mode all the time. I have never used eco or sport mode. I drive it like I would a standard gear shift vehicle. Not really trying for maximum economy or booting it either. A lot of short 20 mile and 50 mile runs mainly. Have not done a big trip yet and no long motorway driving so far. Just some background on the following numbers Total Average over 6000 miles = 57.28 mpg. Best mpg is 65.59. Worst mpg is 41.15. These numbers are better than my previous Auris 1.8 TS Excel by the way. Obviously the 1.8 Corolla will make mincemeat of my mpg's but I am well pleased so far.
    11 points
  9. Finally today was the collection day! Here's my 2.0 Design HB ordered 1st Feb
    10 points
  10. At 11 years old I felt it was probably time to invest in a new battery. Although the old one showed no obvious signs in daily use of failing I had become aware that the Stop/Start rarely cut in. I had also done some 'unofficial' discharge tests on the old one such as turning headlights and heated window on and seeing how the voltage held up. The voltage seemed to head south pretty quickly hitting around 12 volts after just a minute or two and very quickly reaching the 11.8 region. It was OK like that for 10 to 15 minutes though in fairness. The original Exide battery gave no clues to its technology such as being AGM or EFB. I was amazed how prices varied and in the end settled for an Exide AGM type from Tayna. Without mention of exact prices I'll just say that Tayna's price inc delivery was still under three figures while Eurocarparts advertise the same battery at (gulp, can't quite believe this) well over three hundred pounds more. And that is on offer. The new battery is noticeably livelier turning over, very much so actually, and also the Stop /Start now works essentially all the time. Curious as to how 'bad' the old battery was I fully charged it (resting voltage after 72 hours was 12.87 volts) and then discharged it into a load drawing around 10 amps. The voltage instantly fell to 12.17 and fell consistently from then on. After two hours it was at 11.2 volts. I would estimate the capacity at around 18 to 25 Ah give or take but with a significant rise in internal resistance. So I think replacement was a sensible move and should probably have been done a little sooner. I've included some shots of the underside... 11 years old and essentially dry weather use only it has now covered 73k with no mechanical issues at all (besides the oil burning). Wiper rubbers are the originals. Tyres were replaced at around 43k and the Dunlop Blue Response Sports I chose are wearing really well. Maybe rotate in another twelve months and they should be good for 100k.
    10 points
  11. I have driven the C-HR 1.8, Yaris 1.5, Corolla 1.8 HB and TS and 2.0 TS, as i work part time to de-fleet them i spend quite a lot of hours driving them. As far as hybrid system is concern the Yaris 1.5 is amazing, it is the only hybrid system that can glide on EV mode over 60mph, I can manage 75+ without trying to hard and when i try my very best i get nearly 90mpg. C-HR Hybird system seems a little different to the current 1.8 HB but more like the Auris 1.8 getting 70mpg in mix is a little bit difficult realistically more like 60-65mpg, however the TNGA platform amazes me so much on the handling i am tempted to buy one. Now to 1.8HB, this is the best choice if you want efficiency and no rush, i manage 65+mpg on mix run and A roads plus city driving 75mpg is not hard. When push along the HB is still an ok car to drive. 1.8 TS and 2.0 TS difference is quite big, you will notice the extra omph. When floored the traction light goes on but you do not feel the car is skidding. when push the 2.0 surge like a diesel, you feel that you are moving but not quick by any means. operation wise i feel the 2.0 tends to always have engine kick in for no obvious reason, the 1.8 kicks in EV mode more often. i ended up buying the 2.0 TS because i do like the extra performance ( coming from a s212 E350) Probably someone could share their thoughts?
    10 points
  12. The inventor of predictive text died recently. His funeral was lost wendy.
    10 points
  13. Back in spring, I filled out a web form to test drive a 2.0 TS out of curiosity because I've started searching for a daily driver since the FJ Cruiser's monstrosity isn't fit for a small Spanish town. It is a bit of a story about how I ended up here with the FJ, and I could get into details if anybody cares. To my surprise, a day later, someone called from local Toyota and offered a test drive in about a week. It turns out they shipped a brand new 2.0 TS from somewhere else in Spain for me to test drive. I was very impressed with handling and dynamics, something I had never expected from a Toyota, now that I owned and drove a few. Then later in summer, I got a quotation on a top trim with a sunroof. Upon revisiting the dealer to pay my deposit, something has changed internally, and I was no longer able to spec it with Pear White (which in turn made choosing Manhattan Grey easier). Sunroof now came in a package with leather, heated back seats and, HUD. They have also downsized to 17" from the 18" wheels. Overall, about one grand difference. I was able to negotiate roof bars and rubber floor mats all around without a price increase. Finally, it is here, sadly not an MY22 as I was hoping but perhaps not a bad thing as I do like physical buttons on the multimedia and only use Apple Carplay. So far had about 150km of motorways and 75 in the city, my overall Hybrid Score is 86, and my average fuel consumption is 5.9 l/100km (47.8 UK MPG). I expected a slightly better figure, but it is still a lot better than 15 liters/100km in the FJ. The weather didn't drop below 10 C, so it isn't particularly cold. I am completely in love with the car; there's some getting used to, as "virtual" parking sensors are screaming at me when I'm getting to my spot in my narrow parking garage. Dislike how light the key is; it just feels very cheap. I ordered a metal cover from Aliexpress to solve this problem. Also wish there was a way to scroll between tank consumption and trip consumption. Other than that, enjoying all bells and whistles, adaptive cruise control, and lane-keeping assist make for a very relaxing drive on the motorway. I think dropping it into Eco mode helps. Kick sensor is nice and fun when opening the boot. I haven't tested the matrix headlights yet, but they do this cool light run when the car starts up. BSM and RCTA are pretty useful. I am not even going to try the auto parking feature. P.s. I've tried to keep it short, clearly I have failed 🙂
    10 points
  14. My 1984 Corolla RWD project & daily driver 🙂
    10 points
  15. Those that have read my recent threads relating to missing fuses in my Mk4 Yaris Excel Hybrid, will perhaps recall I mention that I discovered what appeared to be the wiring harnesses for the footwell lights - but no bulbs / LEDs attached. It was/is one of my niggles that Toyota should go to the lengths of fitting all the wiring for the lights - but not take one more simple step of snapping some bulbs / LEDs in place from the parts bin during manufacture. Especially on the ‘Excel’ spec of Yaris. Correct me if I’m wrong here, but it appears only the ‘Launch’ edition gets the fancy blue footwell lights. Well, I noticed on Youtube (as you do!) that some people have discovered the same thing and fitted the bulbs/LEDs themselves to their own Yaris’s after sending away for the appropriate Toyota parts. This guy from Italy (Claudiettociov1) has made a good guide video (even if - like me, your Italian is a bit rusty!):- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyNWL6xI1-8 The part numbers he uses for the lights (lamp assembly) are 81080-22040. They are about £20+ each and appear to be located in Dubai! You need four (or five if you go for the one under the USB port too - which I haven’t - yet!). I thought - bit pricey that! But, I noticed that you can get 12v LED light strips on eBay very cheaply, so I sent off for some. A pack of 4 strips of blue LEDs for under £4 was not going to break the bank - even if the experiment failed. Well, I’m chuffed to say it didn’t fail and I now have a Yaris with blue footwell lights, which come on with the courtesy lights - very similar to the Launch edition. Pictures are worth a thousand words (so they say), so I’ve attached photos of my progress and the results in fitting these LED strips just in case someone else on here wants to have a go on their own Mk4 Yaris. Of course, I have no idea which Yaris’s were/are fitted with the light harnesses. It might only be the Excel models - but maybe others were/are too. Still, not a bad upgrade for £4. Not too difficult and about an hour’s work. 😉👍
    9 points
  16. Thanks everyone for your comments so far. For the past 30 years I’ve owned Audi/VW vehicles, 5 with manual boxes and 6 with DSG boxes. I’m now retired but used to travel extensively throughout Scotland using mainly A and B class roads. One of the main criticisms of the DSG box was that it was a little bit “jerky” when emerging from junctions but with a light right foot you could eliminate that issue. Otherwise, the DSG was excellent over undulating and winding roads which some automatics might struggle with. Anyway, my needs have now changed as I now travel mainly on urban roads with occasional trips on the motorway. I did have a doubt about the CVT box on the Yaris Cross but after an interesting test drive I decided it was the car for me. I couldn’t believe that the car returned 76 mpg over a very short trip on the motorway followed by an urban route through the south side of Glasgow. Really impressed with Toyota and look forward to getting my Yaris Cross in the not too distant future. Please keep the comments coming in. Cheers
    9 points
  17. Well super excited, the car finally arrived at the Retailer today, the app has been pretty much spot on to be fair and I had to ask the dealer to check it was there after they told me earlier today that it wasn't . Pick it up Thursday evening just in time for a weekend away in Scarborough😃😎
    9 points
  18. FYI, this is the official info from Toyota Førde regarding plug-in battery. 0 – 1,6kWh: reserved space protecting battery from over-discharge 1,6 – 2,5kWh: reserved space for hybrid operation (you are within this range when your EV distance is 0) 2,5 – 16,0kWh: working area of plug-in hybrid 16,0 – 18,1kWh: reserved space protecting battery from overcharging
    9 points
  19. Modern led lights not only too bright but also often point too high especially on a big suvs. Another issue I had discovered recently is that those blueish led are indeed too blue and driving in the night when approaching roundabouts and junction often these cars look like an police blue lights instead of the normal car headlights projection. Car manufacturers went too far with lights design, colour, light projection, patterns and automatic function that seems to me cause more issues than help.
    9 points
  20. Heated windscreen. Ridiculous to have to wait close to 10 minutes with fan on full before driving in cold weather
    9 points
  21. Hi all, Collected the new Corolla on Saturday and had a very enjoyable day out up the West Coast to Ravenglass, sharing the driving with my hubby and changing seats at various coffee stops etc. We both feel that the car has been well worth the wait. We like the driving experience, the seats are very supportive and comfy and feels nicely put together. We particularly like the ride comfort even though it has 18" wheels with low profiles. My other half feared that the ride comfort would be as bad as our last car, Levorg, which also had 18" wheels but slightly taller tyres. However, this has proved not to be the case as the suspension seems far more supple and able to cope with the lumps and bumps of our local roads far better than the Levorg. The Falken tyres are, as my husband noticed on the forums, very noisy particularly on the tar and chip dressings that our local councils' love as a default repair but when driving on proper tarmac roads the noise is minimal in comparison. Can't wait to resume our holidays in continental Europe and get on some decent roads. Surprised to find there are no sill guards in the thresholds of the doors as this is the first car we have bought that doesn't have them as standard (most top spec models usually have them as standard). Ours is an Excel so expected to see them there. We really miss the "blind spot/cross traffic alert" system which we have got used to on our last car over the 6 years of ownership. We managed to get my husband's phone connected via the data cable to Andoid Auto and was up and running in no time. However my older smartphone does not want to play ball and does not install the App successfully. Our first journey of just under 200 miles showed 49mpg with no slow driving but on open fast roads just as we would have driven our last car and probably achieved 39mpg at most. Love the colour, Manhattan Grey, and the pan roof and JBL just add the finishing touches. RzrAzr - you are correct in saying that the Toyota feels like the next level. Bye for now, Rosie
    9 points
  22. Thanks for sharing your video - As a former DVSA driving examiner, clips of driving can be viewed in various ways but here is my view if interested: At the start of the clip you are driving in lane 1 of the motorway. You proceed to undertake the van in lane 2 which has can have serious consequences. What if the van had decided to move back to lane 1 at the point where you were in his blind spot area undertaking him? We cant't see what was going on prior to the undertake but something to consider . . The Mercedes car that was moving from the slip road to join the motorway - Yes he should give way to you and make sure that it is safe to merge. Is an indicator signal absolutely necessary? On that occasion possibly not, where else is there for the Mercedes car to go other than to merge onto the motorway? Rather than maintaining your speed by means of cruise control, you should be prepared to slow down to allow traffic to merge or perhaps consider moving into lane 2 if it's safe to do so. The video you uploaded shows that you had a clear view of the Mercedes that was going to merge (dry roads - clear view) yet it appears you made little attempt to react. Regards
    9 points
  23. I hope my wife has a Harty appetite for a Huge helping of humble pie. Apart from being a little embarrassed I think its in everybody's interest that this matter is resolved. So what caused the stops x 2. My wife did. Not being used to autos she forgot the "tuck left leg behind the right " yes double foot job🤬 . The garage had the car in and down loaded all available data and sent it to Toyota UK. They were really quick, I was told anything connected with braking was top priority. They were right. Toyota UK sent back to the garage pages of data and an assessment of the cause. Coming from a Technical background I asked to see the data recovered because I would hopefully understand it. Comprehensive data is stored all the time, seat position, tyre pressures, windscreen wipers thats the type of thing I expected. The interesting sheets showed throttle position, brake position, steering wheel angle, all the critical data. There was 2 plots showing the stops on the video, the plots showed brake pedal being depressed in milliseconds before the stops. If it was an emergency stop due to the radar there would have been no brake pedal movement but it would show the brakes being applied. It was clearly a drivers input. The dealership were great, the workshop controller was in charge of the investigation together with the service manager. They spent about 20 minutes going through all the data with me and explaining things I wasn't sure about. In conclusion I can say top marks to the dealership and Toyota UK for identifying the issue ( my wife ) After the meeting I went home and had a conversation with Maureen along the lines " We will have to modify our driving style......." big empathise on WE. I think that because Maureen has a manual gearbox car is unhelpful. So wanting to put that right I drove the new Yaris hybrid. Very impressed with it. So was she. We have ordered a Yaris and have been given a delivery slot of 15th September. The car was fine, the operator needs more training. Your all welcome to have a good laugh and post humorous replies if you wish. Beware Maureen might read the replies. The garage did give me all the data and graphs that Toyota produced, interesting stuff.
    9 points
  24. I am now the proud owner of a 17-plate Prius PHV in Hypersonic Red. Generally speaking, I don’t like red cars, but for some reason I like this one. I'm sure I will be posting more about it in due course. Here's a nice picture of it: However, the process of getting to the stage where this particular car is sitting on my drive has been nothing less than tortuous. What I was expecting to be a joyful process full of anticipatory excitement turned out to be an arduous and depressing slog, as my wife and I travelled hundreds of miles around the country seeking the 'right' car, only to discover an almost-uniformly awful experience at each Toyota dealership we visited. I should perhaps point out that this is likely to be a long post, written more for my own cathartic benefit than for anyone else's interest, so here’s the tl;dr up front, to save you the effort of reading through the drivel beneath: Uninterested, uninformed dealers making half-hearted attempts to sell cars, often in worryingly-dubious condition, for staggeringly random prices. Anyway, if you do want to read on, here's the unexpurgated version. It's not pretty... To start with, what the juddering hell is the deal with pricing on these cars? It's insane. Brand spanking new Prius Excel PHVs are available through Carwow for £27.5k, so why would anyone pay more than that for a used one with a few thousand miles on it? Yet we found tens for sale, well above that price point. The bizarrely specific numbers like £28,471 suggested some kind of machine-learning algorithm at play. I can only assume this was locked in some kind of infinite rank-ordering comparison loop, as I actually saw individual vehicle prices going up as well as down in the time I was monitoring them. Unsurprisingly, these optimistically-priced specimens are all still for sale now, having spent months on forecourts already. I am utterly baffled at what is happening here. Even more mystifying was the price differential between apparently identical cars. We found cars with the same specs, age and mileage, for sale at up to £5k difference in sticker price. In one case, this difference was between two cars at the same dealership! Granted, the cheaper one was in Dishwasher White but even so, you've got to really hate kitchen appliances to pay five large more for Decuma Grey, right? Price had seemingly no bearing on condition, either. And, on the subject of condition, the state we found some of these cars in was shockingly poor, given that they were all Toyota Approved cars with minimal miles, less than 18 months old. The first one we saw had done fewer than 2,000 miles yet looked like it had done ten times that; it was covered in scratches inside and out, with big chips of paint missing from the front bumper. The driver's door looked like it had repeatedly been opened into a brick wall, and was down to the bare metal along its edge. Yet the conversation that followed went roughly like this: "The car is priced taking its condition into account." "Okay, but if we agree to buy it, will you get your bodyshop to sort the worst bits of the paintwork out before we collect?" "The car is priced taking its condition into account." "That’s a no, then?" "The car is priced taking its condition into account." "And you're not prepared to make any kind of reduction to account for the poor condition, to cover the cost of getting it sorted ourselves?" "The car is priced taking its condition into account." "Right. Bye, then." Then there was the one that turned out to have done over 3,000 miles more than advertised, with a replacement windscreen that had somehow been re-fitted with no seals around it, leaving huge gaps and the plastic scuttle flapping in the breeze, along with two strips of glue residue on the roof from where they'd used the wrong tape to hold it in. "Don't worry, we'll get the workshop to look at the windscreen and get it sorted for you before you pick up the car." "Right. Would that be the same workshop that made such a godforsaken mess of it the first time around?" "Er, yes..." "Er, bye then." And then there was the one that had a big dent in the lower side panel, and which had been run by the dealership boss for 18 months but somehow hadn't been serviced at all in that time. "Don't worry, we'll fix the dent with a bit of filler and we'll service it before you buy it. The manufacturer's warranty will be fine." "You mean the warranty that Toyota specifically state will not be fine, as any items which fail in future as a possible result of lack of servicing will not be covered?" "No, it will be fine. Let me get my service manager to explain why both you and the Toyota website are wrong about this." "No, let me get my coat, and remind me never to assume that Toyota dealers understand their own service intervals and warranty conditions." Still, if some of the cars were poor, the actual experiences and interactions in the showrooms were worse. Here's a flavour of what we endured: Being left waiting for ages whilst the salesman 'found the best price' for my car, only for him to finally come out and offer £1k less than we both knew it was worth. Pro-tip: We all know you can look up a valuation in 30 seconds. If you're going to bid me in the nuts for my car, at least have the common decency not to make me wait for half an hour before you do. Especially not when you're keeping me from my lunch. Being seated directly in front of glass pane windows, squinting into the baking sun, in a showroom that inexplicably didn't have air conditioning, waiting for the salesperson to arrive whilst being forcibly engaged in toe-curlingly banal conversation by a painfully enthusiastic teenager wearing a badge that actually – I kid you not – gave his job title as Host. Pro-tip. Try to ensure you offer a buying experience that doesn't run the risk of contravening the Geneva Convention as a form of cruel and unusual punishment. You may just sell more cars. Being told that the person I'd agreed to meet at the specified time wasn't available, being asked to wait until someone else could see us, then being dealt with by a surly, uncommunicative teenager who had no interest in selling the car and whose knowledge about the product he was supposed to be persuading us to buy was utterly non-existent. He even checked his phone a few times during our conversation. Pro-tip: If you really must employ useless millennials who can't grasp the concept of turning up at an agreed time and place, at least make sure the backup isn't a social media addict from Generation Zombie. Being told that the dealership couldn't provide a valuation for my car at all, unless I first agreed I would definitely buy their car from them and not go elsewhere. Pro-tip. That. Is. Not. How. It. Works. You've just let me walk away, and I will not be coming back. Ever. You can call me all you like the day after. But, just as you discovered, I won't be answering. Being told that my wife couldn't sit next to me in the front for the test drive as the salesman had to be there in case he needed to 'grab the wheel' when I was driving. Pro-tip: Try to avoid insulting your customer's driving ability before they've even got in the car. Oh, and never let my wife ride behind you when you've just ****** her off. We nearly did crash in the end, because I was too busy laughing at her in the rear view mirror as she made gestures behind your back suggesting your proclivity for indulging in onanistic pleasure. Frankly, you were lucky she didn't garotte you with your spivvy skinny tie. Being told that there was 'no room for negotiation' on the initial cost to change you offered. Pro-tip: There is always room for negotiation. Otherwise *cough* you might end up with your car still on your forecourt, at a *cough* considerably reduced price that is now hilariously less than what I was actually willing to pay you weeks ago. Ha ha ha and, indeed, ha. Being told on the phone that I had to pay a £100 'refundable deposit' in order to make sure the car would be available to view the next day. Pro-tip: Wait, what? I don't even… kthxbye. Even when we actually found a car in decent nick that wasn't horrifically overpriced, defective or abused, it was a struggle to complete the purchase. I think it was the young salesman's first ever experience of dealing with someone who didn't want finance. Or possibly just his first ever experience of selling a car. He was giddy with excitement, which was actually quite endearing at first. We finally agreed a price that I was happy to pay, shook hands on the deal, then he went round the back to get the paperwork. All seemed to be going well. Then he returned, looking very sheepish and informed us that we'd have to pay £1 more than we'd just agreed. He explained that he'd exceeded the amount by which he was 'allowed' to discount the car, so would we mind paying a pound more? After my wife and I realised that he wasn't actually joking, we obviously told him to do one. A gentleman does not renege on a handshake, FFS! However, I did generously agree to sign the paperwork for the higher amount if he gave me a quid from his own pocket there and then. Panicking now, and not having any cash himself, he was out of ideas so I suggested he went round the back for a whip-round. I fully expected him to return with a handful of loose change. However, he eventually came back having apparently got permission to put the lower amount through on the card machine whilst keeping the extra £1 on the paperwork. Seriously, that happened. In all honesty, if we hadn't have closed the deal on that one then we'd probably have just thrown in the towel and bought a brand new one on finance. I have a sneaky suspicion that this may actually have been Toyota's plan all along: overprice your used stock and make the buying-for-cash experience so awful that people give up and finance a new one instead. I’m glad we didn't, as I've ended up with what seems to be a decent example, obtained in the end for a fair price. But next time? I'm not sure I'll have the energy. I might just have to accept that long-term ownership is a dying scene, and give in and join the masses on their 3-year contracts and monthly payments...
    9 points
  25. On the Eleventh hour of the Eleventh hour of the Eleventh day, the guns fell silent ... ... ... They went with songs to the battle, they were young. Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted, They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond England's foam.
    9 points
  26. Hi, I had the same problem. Poor start with cold day, engine sometimes only puff-puff and stall (blue-white smoke). In last three years I changed glow plugs, battery, overhaul fuel pump, bought new injectors, bought fuel warmer etc. But everything without effect. Now I found where is problem. If you have a small SCV valve on fuel pump (called Compact SCV) try this home made diagnostic: warm up SCV valve before starting in cold day using hot water or hot airgun (about 80°C). When engine start for first time, piston in SCV valve is seized (rather chill diminishes tolerance and piston seized). Denso prepare new version of SCV valve, please wait few days, I prepare complete guide with pictures, order numbers and Denso service manual. P.S. I´m sorry for my english, because I´m from Czech Republic :-) Edit: 6.2.2013 - Here is part number: new one - 0422626020 (replace old 042260L030) After replace SCV, you must make Supply Pump Initialization Procedure - see enclosed Denso Repair Manual, Repair Section/2.Diagnostic Overview/2-113 to 2-115. I make this process with Toyota IT II (Intelligent Tester), I think that this way is better than connecting terminals TC and CG.. After replacing SCV during calibration were two random errors. Both of these errors concerned Air Mass sensor and Intake Air Temperature. I erased all this errors three times during calibration. Now is everything OK. Torque for SCV bolts is 6,9Nm first, 10,8Nm second. DENSO CR SERVICE MANUAL.pdf
    9 points
  27. This is an American article on which vehicles are traded in for the Nissan Leaf. Over there it is the Toyota Prius, where 18% of all trades in for a Leaf were Prii. http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1067548_which-cars-are-getting-traded-in-for-electric-cars-we-find-out So I'm curious what the figures are over here? I'm wondering if it would be similar or at least is the Prius the top trade in. If it is, Toyota might want to reassess the ridiculous price of their forthcoming PHEV Prius as customers don't appear loyal to the brand as such, but rather the early adoptor nature of the new technology. I've got a Prius and am tempted for a Leaf. I liked the idea of the PHEV Prius, but £31,000!!! lol not a chance. What would you get if you were to replace your Prius - a PHEV Prius, a Leaf or the Ampera?
    9 points
  28. I was looking to order a Yaris Design in scorched orange for next March(ish) hence my username when I joined the forum 😄 However after much online searching I found a Launch Edition 71 plate (so MY21.5) in excellent condition with protection plus pack and front/rear dash cam installed. So I'm the proud owner of my first automatic and my first hybrid. I'm really enjoying it after driving manual cars for many years. It's not orange despite what the log book says but I love the red with contrasting black roof. I'm pleased with the mpg too for my short local journeys. I did read lots of posts on this forum before deciding, so you could say that many of you had an input in my decision 😘
    8 points
  29. Collected! Nice to be back in a Corolla, I’ve had a VW Up for the last 3 months, this now feels like a limo..
    8 points
  30. Just picked up a 2020 2.0ltr Excel Corolla in Manhattan Grey. Had to scour the country to get the right deal and ended driving 700 mile round trip plus a night in a hotel to get one. Thats a story for another day, using internet and phone to deal with 25 dealers . Won't bother listing everything I like all been said here, I've come from high mileage area manager in fast diesels and some decent private cars like tuned Saab and tuned MX5, and now in semi retirement and got this as need to ferry lad about as he hops between university and stuff like that. Only brief test drive in 1.8. Car comfy good interior looks good etc etc and infotainment not as bad as reviewers make out . Anyway, some observations. 330 miles and 57mpg, I'll take that, EV mode at 70 going downhill was nice. Ride on the 18s with those skinny tires is excellent, probably what impressed me most . Chassis ok, but steering very light and not much feedback, not a car to hustle down the lanes. Sport mode and the flappy panels really quite funny actyally, if you use these you've possibly bought the wrong car. All I used was ECO mode and found that flooring the pedal was more than enough to take off around lorries. Watching the total mpg plummet when you did and ECO score drop was a giggle. But the response even in ECO more was fine. The 2ltr has effortless power for everyday driving and in sport mode can keep the company car nutters in 320Ds at bay over 100 yards but I won't be using that, just tested it. Battery is only 3 bars when I got home, went out later and after a mile the eco mode wasn't available. Think the car was stood at the dealer for a while, when I collected it had to have a new 12v battery and it's only 2 years old. LTA and ACC are superb and as good as the Volvo and Audi I've had . Android auto meh, can't get many apps as I have podcasts on YouTube and other apps and can't access it, plus I like the nav directions on the digital dash better with the car system, plus just seems an easier system to use and Google maps not as quick to get me in the right lane as the car system, a pet hate of mine. So just gonna stick with the car . The Manhattan grey really suits it, only one I could find with a dealer willing to deal was a long way away but worth it . So very impressed. Surprisingly easy car to master , a few YouTube's and and away you go. Oh and can't see the point of the hill assist, the creep does it all for you. I suppose someone starting on a literally vertical hill might use it . All in all probably just going to keep it in ECO mode . Best thing so far? The economy is as good as claimed, it looks great and is a very comfortable effortless drive. Worst thing? Probably steering feel but as I've just come from a modded MX5 that's just probably muscle memory . Very good car .
    8 points
  31. Then thing about this hybrid system is, that el. motor (MG2, motor generator 2, traction motor) actually has the rated power, but the buttery is the limiting factor. In general, the bigger the battery, the more power it can provide, and the one in toyota hybrid is rather small. It can't provide full power to the MG2. So, for the electric motor MG2, to give all available power, petrol engine has to use some of its power to generate electricity. This is done by spinning MG1 and produced electricity is used to power MG2. As you can see, it is a tradeoff, you can give MG2 full power, but by doing that, some of the power from the petrol engine is used to produce electricity. So you can never have full combined power on both on the road at the same time. I also noticed that. I believe that it is because toyota is chasing maximum efficiency. If you are accelerating reasonably hard, but no full throttle, there is always some of the energy going from the engine to the battery, (via MG1) so it can be used later. In this case, engine is at the peak efficiency, but because you don't require so much power, it is used to charge the batteries for later. But if you floor it, petrol engine is basically doing the same thing(same power output), but instead of charting the battery, battery is being discharged and energy used to propel you forward.
    8 points
  32. Separate forums for the different marks of models has been raised previously. Some members already have difficulty navigating the separate model forums, let alone sub-dividing these into marks. We have contributing members who own earlier marks than the mark 4 and 5, so presumably would need separate forums for the marks 1 to 3. If we were to do this we would have to do the same for the other models - eg. 2 for the Aygo, 4 for the Yaris, potentially 12 for the Corolla (though workably just 6), 2 for the Auris, 3 for the Avensis, 5 for the Rav4, 4 for the Prius, etc, Plus separate ones for the Aygo X, Yaris Cross, Corolla Cross, and forthcoming BEV's. Do we also have separate forums for HEV's, PHEV's? As regards a new order section - again should that be one for all models, one for each model or what? The Club did go through a re-vamp last year, which tidied things up. We have a small moderating team (2) who do this on a voluntary basis, have other lives to live (including work) and, to be honest, we don't have the time to go through the various forums to delete old topics. We do allow a degree of variance in topics, and yes, we could police topics more rigidly, but I for one, am not convinced that is what the majority of members want. If members no longer find the forums useful, they can opt out if they wish. It is their choice.
    8 points
  33. So, in that case this can be a real 😉😂👌
    8 points
  34. hey guys, thought i would give you all an update, the MAF sensor replacement did NOT solve my problem, after breaking down once again i had the car transported to a toyota dealer (not the same as the first one i went to) and after providing written consent for them to download the vehicle control history they where able to pinpoint the first time the error code appeared and right along side it was another code which turned out to be the Fuel Pump relay switch, which they replaced and now thankfully after 12 days of driving its safe to say all is good, i will however be putting an official complaint in to Toyota regarding the service i received from the first dealer as its believed by all involved that had they done what the second dealer did it would have saved me almost £2k as i most likely wouldnt have had to replace the cat and sensors including MAF, will let you guys know how i get on with complaint ;-)
    8 points
  35. Update on my new Yaris Hybrid, collection date confirmed for 11.30am Monday 7th February, roll on the weekend 🚘
    8 points
  36. another one .. a more powerful horn, rather than the 'Noddy car' one supplied!
    8 points
  37. You only get EV mode at 70mph if you ease off, with a reasonable amount of battery available. In reality the electric motor cannot sustain the speed, so it slowly drops off, drains the battery and your back on ICE
    8 points
  38. My car was picked up yesterday. Ordered November. It is a MY22. Very pleased. The informat handbook supplied with the car is for the 21.5 model?
    8 points
  39. I work at a Toyota dealer and we have just had our first my22 delivered to site today aswell as the older spec on same transporter looks like they are on there way to dealers
    8 points
  40. Ordered in August and very happy to say I collected my Design yesterday, very happy with it 🙂
    8 points
  41. Toyota UK spec Yaris cars don't include the boot space false/levelling floor as they do in continental Europe... so I made my own....
    8 points
  42. If I am typical then I defend myself by saying that the difference in economy at an average 65 and an average 70mph is marginal. But the difference in driving is immense. I find that there are few occasions on motorways when a relaxed cruise is possible and, being a police-taught defensive driver, I vary my speed according to the needs of the traffic and other conditions. This often ,means going at 70 or even a little more, to break out of clusters where in most cases people are travelling too close together, lorries are bunched in the slower lanes and forward visibility is limited. I count the pennies, but I put safety first as I'm sure you do, too. A principal reason for choosing motorhomes over caravans (I owned several of both) was the restriction on lane 3/4 and the 60mph limit. Far too often I'd be stuck for miles behind a driver doing 50 - 55 who never looked in their mirror and refused to move over. (And, yes, with a properly set up rig a car and caravan are quite safe at 60!) Although I rarely did 70 in a motorhome in the UK, abroad was a different question....and economy lost out to the need to cover long distances as quickly as possible. Finally I should add that having driven the C-HR Excel Hybrid for five months I think its speed and economy are outstanding.
    8 points
  43. Couldn’t agree more with all forum members, I think you got it all wrong from the beginning with perhaps very different expectations. Toyota e-CVT hybrid drivetrain is the best and most reliable transmission ever created by all manufacturers, it is the closest think to full electric cars by performance, efficiency and reliability, where the infamous DSG is the worst one together with some cvts from other manufacturers. The vw build quality and engineering is not ahead of Toyota, even its behind, especially under the bonnet. I am not a fanboy at all, and I used to like vw cars and still have some in the family, but these were different times. Since 2005 vag has lost it, not even 1 good engine or transmission. Now back to Toyota., The chr it’s not my favourite model either for two reasons: 1- bad design especially rear doors and windows, too cramped inside with dark roof lining makes it unpractical and claustrophobic indeed and this is what I agree with your statements, 2- just don’t like that type of cars in general. , rather have a Corolla or RAV4, no offence to any Chr owner, we are all different and we like different things and here is the key to your disappointment., Toyota hybrids drives very different from any other cars with ice (internal combustion engines) and some people dislike that smooth continues acceleration, they prefer old school gears, revs, shift shocks , noises etc. My advice is to watch some videos how the hybrid system works, how it’s built, how performs and how to get the most out of it , been efficient or fast , there are tricks for both and once you learn how to use it the way it’s designed you may start to like it at least a bit just to drive until the time for replacement is coming, and if you still don’t like it just buy vw dsg and enjoy your driving. I used to love vw and still like a lot of their models and would pick some over Toyota cars but the hybrid drivetrain is a magic and delivers the best , and simply will stick with Toyota just because of that reason. You car is definitely not slower than others in the same category, it’s just smoother and more relaxed to drive. 👍
    8 points
  44. Season 1, Episode 5 - at last, the season finale! 😀👏 The call came this afternoon - "your car is ready!" I've been to collect it, they've filled it with petrol and cleaned it inside and out, and it is now sporting a little led inside, a plate underneath and a couple of new window labels announcing it has a catloc to hopefully deter any tealeaves. Apparently the new alarm is very loud, but I hope never to hear it.And I've registered the new catloc - it's not an insurance scheme, but they've security marked the cat so I have registered that. I enjoyed my drive home and I'm glad to have my own car back. I'm just looking forward, as I'm sure we all are, to being able to take it out for a drive for pleasure. 👍
    8 points
  45. Got my 2.0 litre yesterday. Oh my word what a car. Drove back from swindon to Bristol and got 58.8 mpg. Wife took it out today and got 59.9 mpg on a short trip. Magnificent car.
    8 points
  46. Protection against thieves? Well, it used to be called the law but then all sorts of protectional clap trap was introduced by do-gooders and found more easy to enforce than actually stopping the people from taking what doesn't belong to them. Now, you aren't allowed to give the individual who is helping themselves to your property a good pasting. Apparently, one of the most effective deterrents is prayer and the fear of being smited for ones sins by the almighty or in the case of prius catalytic converters, hope that God is looking and lets the jack slip.
    8 points
  47. I am getting fed up of the number of posts where people are bragging about driving at speeds well in excess of the speed limit. None of this "private road/race track nudge nudge wink wink" crap either. The next person to make a post of this nature will be banned. No warning, no message to ask you not to post things like that just straight to a ban. If you want to post about your exploits breaking the law then please also include your full name, address, car reg and where/when you broke the speed limit so that TOC can pass it on to your local Police so that you can be removed from our roads as well as our forums!
    8 points
  48. This guide is wriiten to hopefully answer most of the often asked questions about the 2AD 2.2 Diesel engine and its problems. The Symptoms Owners complain of the following; Excessive oil consumption. Coolant Water being blown out of the expansion tank and the colour sometimes turning darker in colour. Excessive Fuel consumption. Blocked or heavily sooted EGR valves And of course cars going into limp mode or displaying fault codes relating to this engines issues. Toyotas Answer. Well Toyota really stepped up to the plate and offered an extended warranty which can be found in the following text taken from the TSB (Technical Service Bulletin) "AD Engine Out of Warranty Guidelines (0730J) We are pleased to advise that we have received more formalised guidelines from TME for the handling of AD engine problems on out of warranty vehicles. The coverage and processes are summarised below. Conditions Covered 1) Oil consumption worse than 0.5 litre per 621 miles (1,000 km) 2) Overheating & Head Gasket failure due to carbon deposits on the pistons For all other out of warranty conditions related to AD engine problems, where the customer complaint can be directly linked to a “carbon clogging” concern, i.e. EGR Valve, DPNR, 5th Injector, EGR Cooler, blocked manifold, etc., we would accept this as being linked to an oil consumption condition. Vehicles Covered Those vehicles fitted with AD diesel engines; ��Avensis with 1AD or 2AD (Prod. Date: Apr 2005 to Feb 2009) ��RAV4 with 2AD (Prod. Date: Jul 2005 to Dec 2008) ��Auris with 1AD or 2AD (Prod. Date: Sep 2006 to Sep 2009) ��Verso with 2AD (Prod. Date: Apr 2005 to Nov 2008) Age / Mileage Covered These guidelines cover vehicles up to 7 years old and 111,846 miles (180,000 km), whichever the sooner. This is conditional on there being a retail customer complaint and the vehicle having been reasonably maintained". So what do I do if my car is displaying the above faults? You should take Your car for inspection to your nearest Toyota Dealers. They will check your oil level and carry out all or any checks required by Toyota and read any stored fault codes. You will then be asked to take the car back to the dealer after approximately 1000 miles and the oil will be checked again to determine if its oil consumption is to great as in the TSB above. So what happens next? If it is deemed You engine is burning too much oil, is sooting the EGR valve or displaying any of the above related faults your engine will be replaced under the extended warranty. What will be replaced? The engine assembly in Toyota terms is a ¾ engine which is basically the whole engine from the sump up to the rocker cover. Up until mid 2011 engines were rebuilt by the Dealer but after this proved too time consuming and sometimes unsuccessful, engines were replaced as a ¾ assembly for economic reasons. Sometimes these replacement engines are reworked or remanufactured engines rebuilt in Japan. Sometimes the engines are brand new. The following will or may be replaced during the procedure. EGR valve. Injectors including the 5th injector. Catalytic convertor. DFP filter (Diesel Particulate Filter). The engine oil of course and the coolant . Air conditioning will be re gassed. The procedure for and during replacement Well I will explain what my experience was...... Once the car was diagnosed and the engine replacement was approved I took the car into the Dealer who kindly supplied me with a free courtesy car. 2 days later I was called and informed my car was ready for collection. I was given a work sheet detailing what had been done and the new engine number. Note: It is the owners responsibility to inform the DVLA of the change. The differences between old and new engine. The new engine is much quieter. Fuel consumption is far better than before. Consider also; If You are having a new engine fitted under warranty, consider having a new clutch assembly fitted while the engine is out. There will normally be no labour charge for this as there is no increased labour as all these parts are stripped out during replacement. It would otherwise cost in the region of £1200 (should it become necessary) for a clutch replacement on a RAV4 but less on an Auris, Avensis or Verso. I hope this answers most of the questions. If I have made any mistakes please PM Me and I will correct.... Charlie.
    8 points
×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership