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    Cyker

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/15/2010 in all areas

  1. First impressions: Nippier than the Red Baron, most definitely. Suspension seems much more taught but that could be because it's new and there was only 4 miles on the clock so hasn't had chance to soften yet. I don't know if it's just me being subjective but I swear that the turning circle is tighter?! My beloved HUD is there and after what seemed to be disaster (Hybrid Assistant shut down with "unknown" in the space for the car model!) and much hasty transfer of debugging logs, the team at Hybrid Assistant quickly "fixed me" and that is up and running great! Happy days! Obviously, I've only driven it 20 miles back to home so check back here in a week or so and I'll try and do a much more objective revue directly comparing it with our dear departed Launch Edition (the Red Baron). So far, so many more dashboards to tinker with!! 🤣 I know it is not usual to show the reg number of a car but I just couldn't resist this as we managed to get a "kind of" status plate by accident when I saw it on the list and it fits me to a "T"!! 😇 (PS. ...and the "new24" is pretty appropriate too!!)
    21 points
  2. Well, just under 200k mark I decided to go earlier with my scheduled service instead of waiting as every next day is another big number added to the existing ones 🙃🏎🏁. Here it is what I have done to the car: 1. New engine oil and filter 2. New transmission fluid - drain and refill 3 litres 3. New spark plugs - older one looked good and easy to undo them, the trick is let the engine running for 5 min before you start , in colder weather 10min is fine. 4. New air filter and Pollen filter 5. Engine coolant 5 litres- you can do that without even taking the engine under cover, you need a 9mm ID clear tube 30cm long and an empty container, perhaps a gallon from the same stuff. , again drain and refill. Before you start set heating to max temperature and blower speed 1, and after refill set the car into maintenance mode it takes around 20-30min running and the engine coolant needs to reach 95C° and thermostat to open and both radiator fans to kick in and spin. Add coolant as necessary. 6. Inverter coolant drain ad refill, around 2 litres of coolant , again after you fill up full turn on the car and immediately turn off, go to the engine bay and top up to max. Repeat this process 3 times, set the level just above max. 7. Fit engine undercover after all checked for fluids leaks. Use new plastic clips where old one are broken, also best to replace front M6 bolts with stainless steel ones, I did that many years ago. 👌 Well that’s pretty much all. I hope for another few 000 trouble free miles🏎🏁👍 I can give torque settings, and from where to start first if anyone interested of diy car service.
    19 points
  3. After 2.5 days with the 12 month old Corolla I've come to a few conclusions. Firstly, what a superb car this is! The owner and press reviews I read before buying it were all very favourable but I wasn't expecting it to be this good. I popped out this afternoon to get some bits to finish off a new kitchen we've been doing, it was only 3 miles - but almost 50 miles later I arrived back home 😁. I just cant get enough of it, I never thought a daily driver could be so nice. My wife has even expressed a great fondness for it and she never makes any comments about our cars. Yet, there she is this evening on the phone to her mates telling them how nice it is. It's taken me 50 years to achieve that. There are one or two points raised by some journo reviews I've read which I disagree with and some i agree with: Firstly, the so called "disconnect" between accelerator pedal and engine which pops up a few times? Can't say I can feel that, it's just like driving a normal auto. Press the loud pedal and the car shoves forward just fine - no real lack of power as reported in some press reviews either. It's not the fastest thing out there for sure but it's certainly not slow. There's no CVT whine that I can hear, which is another thing i've seen mentioned more than once. Engine sounds noisy and can rev high? - I've not noticed that either. It can rev a bit high momentarily sometimes but it's far from intrusive, in fact it's a very relaxed car to drive. The only negative things I really agree with are the lack of rear seat legroom and the smallish boot, neither of which is an issue for us as we rarely take passengers in the back and our dog fits nicely in the boot area. Before setting off on the little run today I reset the mpg gauge and after my (quite "spirited") run I arrived back home with 59.4mpg average showing. Which is 16.7mpg more than the Peugeot I had before. This equates to 158.65 more miles for the range of the 9.5 gal of the Corolla tank than the equivalent amount in the Peugeot (which has a 14 gallon tank). I bought this car to keep beyond its warranty period as I'm at an age now where it'll most likely be my last car and so far the signs are good that this Corolla and me are going grow old together. A couple of photos, taken on the wet but local "fun" roads that I usually reserve for taking pics of the old 1970s Mini and MG.................
    19 points
  4. The symptoms. The MPG is disgraceful this time last year we was averaging no less than 38mpg over a tank and around 42-45mpg when driven on a run with cruise control set at 70mph. Over Christmas we did approx 1500miles and have managed best on a run +4oc 31mpg driving with cruise control set at 70mph, when it was cold we was down to 21mpg and have now risen to around 30mpg driving like your gran going to church. These figures are a long way short of the figures that Toyota quote and of what we was achieving this time last year with similar temperatures, it may be worth noting the car makes a pinking sound at around 1800-2300rpm if you put your foot down and there is a small delay / flat spot in throttle response (not turbo lag) when you press the accelerator, I suspect this is the fly by wire throttle system but is it supposed to have a delay? How to clean, I did have to borrow a few pictures as I had cleaned mine by the time I made this thread. 1. Remove the engine cover, this just pulls up and unclips. 2. Now you can see the EGR Valve, you will need a 12mm socket, Ratchet and extension to remove this. 3. Remove these 2 x bolts 1st for the pipe above the EGR valve. 4. Now undo the other 4 x 12mm nuts and bolts from the EGR valve and unplug this from the wiring loom, this can now be removed. 5. This is now what you will find. Dirty manifold with 2 x blocked breathing holes. Dirty EGR valve with restricted air flow. 6. I cleaned these using an old toothbrush, small screw driver, carburettor cleaner, old cloth and a dyson cleaner to suck the muck out. Try to scrape and brush out the thick carbon then use the carburettor cleaner to clean the finish this off. Now once all this is cleaned out just simply refit, This took me a total of 15 minutes so I assure you this is very easy. The results This will vary for everyone but in my experience I did a 360mile round trip the next day with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, going there (more downhill) the roads where very very wet with poor visibility and approx 7oc and we averaged 41.1MPG by the time we got there. When we come home with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, slightly uphill most of the way the roads where dry and approx 3oc the average MPG had dropped to 40.0. When I filled up we got 37.4litres in the tank which I rounded up to 38 and worked out at 43MPG (I always brim the tank). This is now showing a big improvement / approx 20% for a 15minute job of cleaning the EGR valve. I will also note the slight flat spots in throttle response are a lot less than before. I would like to say a big thank you to cabcurtains for bringing the EGR valve to my attention and to twingo69 as I borrowed a few pictures from his thread to make this guide. UPDATE Ok it has been nearly 5 months and around 4k since I did this do this morning I thought I would check the EGR valve. To be honest the manifold was very very clean maybe a small less than 1mm coating of carbon and the EGR valve had a little more, I did clean this again while it was removed but in my opinion looking at what I seen today I would recommend cleaning this around every 12months or 10k. UPDATE Well over the next 12 months the MPG just continued to drop, Toyota claimed there was no problems with the car but by Feb 11 we could only manage 28-32MPG at best. I had also noticed the car had started to do a lot of DPF recycle burns and suspect the DPF was maybe on its way out, we had no warrenty left on the car so had a shop around and exchanged for a 5 month old 500 mile CRZ. What can I say but for sure the CRZ is one of the best cars we ever owned and was fantastic on fuel (49MPG average for every turn of the key over 9 months and 9000 miles) but due to the birth of Lewis we needed a bigger car so exchanged this for a CTR (FN2), I will say that so far over 7000 miles this has returned 29MPG for us which puts a quicker petrol car in the same area as the T180 when we traded this in. What never made sence was when we first bought the T180 we could get 40-44MPG no problem then at around 30'000 miles the MPG just started to drop while nothing really changed, we never found a cure for this or a fault but for sure this is problem and Toyota must know about this because they dropped the 2.2 and 2.0 Auris diesel cars and have now agreed to use BMW diesel engines from 2013. Why the worlds largest car manufacturer would need to use a BMW diesel engine is beyond me unless it shows they are struggling to get a modern diesel to be clean and efficient while being very driveable.
    19 points
  5. Hello, I am writing this as a form of therapy as I wait for delivery of my new Corolla. It contains little useful information and it requires no answer but feel free to comment. I have been driving for around 10 years now. I am not really a car guy in the traditional sense but I do appreciate nice cars, I love driving and I enjoy watching Formula 1. My first car was a W reg (2001) Ford Focus. It had a 1.6 naturally aspirated petrol with (mated to- as the motoring journalists like to say) a three speed auto with, wait for it... overdrive. Being 20 years old and owning an automatic was sacrilege to my friends but me being a poor student and the car being a gift from my grandad, I was in no position to feel hard done by. The car was surprisingly good for what it was albeit that it was slow and not very reliable I loved it. At that time I was driving around 20k miles per year and at 35mpg the Focus was costing too much. Introduce the 308. A couple of years later I traded in the Focus to upgrade to the Peugeot 308. It was an upgrade in every way over the focus: beige in colour, only a year and a half old and with a whopping 92 horsepower from its 1.6 litre turbo diesel. Crucially, this car had a manual transmission for more street cred and could easily achieve 70mpg on a motorway run. At this point I still knew very little about cars and pretty much went for the first one the guy at Arnold Clark showed me. I loved the 308 almost as much as I loved the focus but the relationship soured after about two years. It needed some repairs due to a rock hitting the bottom and breaking the fuel line and new brake discs at 30k miles. I thought that wasn't very long for brake discs so I started asking questions about how reliable the owner of the garage thought my 308 would be. To my horror he opined that French cars tended to have problems with electrics as they aged so I could expect things to crop up over time. I was making a decent amount of money at this point so I started shopping around for an upgrade. I was doing a lot of miles up and down the A9 which at that time still didn't have average speed cameras so it was very much whacky races and I had been in a couple of close calls when trying to overtake lorries (cars coming the other way at 95mph kind of close calls) so I wanted more overtaking punch and something a bit more comfortable. My mum had owned Volkswagens for years and swore by them and the local dealer in Inverness has a great reputation for customer service (and still does). I test drove a Ford Kuga with 180hp diesel which was lovely but noisy and expensive for what you got, a Tiguan which was nice but again , expensive for the features. I finally settled on the Golf. 2.0 litre turbo diesel. Powerful enough, economical enough and very very comfy inside. I loved the Golf just a little more than the 308 but less than the Focus. It was a semi-sensible choice for a man of 24 and my first new car purchase. I was the proud owner of a 65 plate golf Match. For most of my life I was not a Toyota fan. My first real awareness of them was in 2015 when I was getting the Golf fixed after someone ran into the back of me and smashed up the rear bumper and boot lid. The repair centre was right next to the local Toyota dealer and I had a chance to look around while burning some time. I looked at the Auris hybrid sitting in the forecourt and scoffed at the relatively stodgy interior and frumpy looks outside. I knew better than to buy a hybrid of course, as we all knew back then hybrids were only good in town and long-distance driving was much better in a diesel. Off I went secure in the knowledge that I had made a good choice in the Golf. Low and behold a few months later spawned: Dieselgate. It turned out VW had been less than up-front with its Euro 5 NOx Emissions and although my Golf was a Euro 6 I was furious with them. The news spoiled the image of VW entirely in my mind and all I had was a sour feeling of having been lied to. My life changed suddenly when I was under threat of redundancy at work so I decided to ditch the Golf on PCP. I initiated the voluntary termination and away it went. For the first time in years I did not have a car to call my own. Where I lived in the Scottish Highlands at the time public transport was utterly inadequate to get around so I borrowed my sisters VW Up! for a few months to get to and from work. I won't say too much about the Up! except to say that it was adequate as a runabout. I ended up going to back to university so for a couple of years I did not own a car as I was broke and had no real need for one. Being a lightweight car guy however, I spent a lot of time on Youtube watching Scotty Kilmer videos. Anyone who has seen Scotty Kilmer knows he has probably resulted in more Toyota Sales than all of their sales people combined over the last couple of decades. I eventually got the car bug and started shopping around for something cheap to buy and run but that had enough power and space to be comfortable and fun to drive whilst also being reliable. Under Scotty's influence I started looking at Toyotas but to my disappointment I couldn't find one that really ticked the boxes. The petrol Auris looked like an OK match but it lacked power. Eventually I compromised and went for a Honda Civic. Honda is a brand that Scotty would say isn't what it used to be but can still make decent cars. I found a 1.8 naturally aspirated Civic developing (more motoring journalism) 136 horsepower. Not quite the 150 of the Golf, but enough. The 2007 Civic Type S was an awesome machine. It had the sporty looks, the reliability and it had a cool moonroof. It also returned a surprisingly good 43 mpg without really trying; so long as you didn't rev it up to its peak at 6500rpm. Which of course you did because it only had any power at all above 4500 rpm. At that point it burned about as much oil as it did petrol but wow was it fun. Alas, like all of my cars the fun wasn't to last. I got engaged. At that point I was still doing huge mileage commuting to work and my fiance hardly drove at all so it didn't make sense for us to have two cars. Hers was on a lease which was ending and the car bug was back at me so off I went to the internet (covid restricitons were well in effect by now) and started shopping for a car. She wanted an automatic and I wanted an estate with enough power and great fuel economy from either Honda or Toyota. It turned out that automatics and fuel economy were the antithesis to each other in almost every case. Every case except the hybrids that is. With an official return of over 70mpg (on the old measurement), a CVT auto and Toyota engineering, the Auris went straight to the top of the list. I rushed down the the dealer and took it for a test drive. (the rules sill allowed those at that point) I fell in love with it instantly. It wasn't really the best in any category you threw at it but the Auris was good enough in every category. With used car sales bombing and low interest rates I picked the 2017 estate business edition hybrid for a mere £12k on PCP costing £170 per month. I am still driving it to this day and I have put 40k miles on it with but one issue with the headlights both blowing at once, apparently a common issue with these cars. It is by far the most well rounded car I have owned and I couldn't recommend it enough to someone looking for dependable and efficient driving. Over that 40k miles I have averaged about 58MPG indicated which I am very pleased about. I had been at the Toyota dealer a few times getting it serviced and the new Corollas caught my eye. Sleek, very high tech and powerful with a 180hp hybrid option. Alas at 25-30k they were way out of my PCP range so with the Auris I stuck. Until. With the easing of lockdowns and the surge in demand for microprocessors coupled to a lack of supply new car wait times increased and accordingly used car prices shot up. Having added 18 months and 40k miles to my Auris I then had a firm valuation of it at over £14k. For the first time the value of my car had appreciated and by quite a lot. It seems the car bug bit me at just the right time. I was now in a position to trade in my Auris and have a sizeable down payment on a shiny new corolla. Armed with a 3.5k Carwow discount, a deposit contribution and 0% PCP offer I ordered a 2.0 Hybrid Touring Sports in Design trim. I initially ordered the HB but cancelled it when I received a better offer on the estate making the price the same. That was on the 30th November 2021 and here I wait still. Refreshing the app twice daily to check for an update that never comes. This is my story so far.
    19 points
  6. Well, I spotted the Toyota Yaris Cross Premiere Edition that has all the bits I wanted, so drove from Wokingham to Pontypridd early this morning and bought it and drove it home 😄 So it was farewell to my Aygo X Exclusive. Credit to the previous owner, it's pristine and looks like it's never been used and it even has the stickers still on the shocks etc 👍 So I will be reading the owners manual to get to know it, but one thing's popped up early which I noticed on the way home. All the windows do full auto down and up, but not the drivers, not sure if that's a setting or a fault !!. I'm sure more questions will follow through time 😄
    18 points
  7. Apart from 2 forays into other marques I've pretty much bought Fords, and mostly the XR/ST/RS ones at that, my whole life. I only switched to Toyota due to Ford withdrawing the Fiesta as I really missed the smaller cars. And their obsession with electric only 🤔 So I was always going to be a reluctant soldier and my purchase was going to be full of scepticism and maybe (hopefully not) regret. But I have to say that I absolutely love the Premiere edition because: - I love the blue colour - The body shape is excellent - The economy is amazing - It drives beautifully - It's a technical tour de force. Love playing with the throttle to try and tease as much economy out of it as I can and the HUD is just fab - The adaptive cruise is more intelligent than Ford's - The ability of the speed limiter to match itself to the current speed limit with just one button press is just excellent. I use the speed limiter constantly so this is really good - Mrs Dastardly (Penelope?) loves it - The configuration options on the dashboard are excellent. - It just feels like it's been designed by boffins, rather than people in overalls But it's not all roses 🌹 Some, albeit minor, annoyances. - The engine is quite harsh/growly. Ford's 3 pot system is much smoother and not nearly as loud. - The door handles feel quite flimsy due to being quite thin but I'm sure I'll get used to that. - The positioning of the window controls are a little strange compared to what I am used to. Very high up. Probably just me though - Severe lack of internal storage. Door pockets are tiny, no opportunity to store anything in the centre console - Quite annoying that your personal options, e.g. turning off PCA, resets every time you re-start the engine, unless I'm just being thick - The "Hold" button resetting itself on every journey is bizarre. Should remember the setting or just be a configurable menu option. - Lack of factory options e.g. sunroof, heated seats. Would have paid for both The negatives are just minor/personal really as the positives are so good. Haven't been this happy with a new car acquisition for a long time 👍
    18 points
  8. Part 2 b. Well it’s here and I must say I’m quite taken by it. The colour is superb (Juniper Blue) although it looks similar to the Cross blue - maybe a little bit darker..... you decide. 4 miles on the clock so absolutely out of the box. This is running round the factory and various harbours. We had some time going through the dash options and there are many single and double clock types. We settled on this double; In the boot, this one has a deck board and while the previous model had a spacesaver, this one has tyre gunk. The accessory kit comes with all Toyota/Lexus models now. The wheels are sensational I’m my opinion, if they were 18 inch, I’d quite like them on the Lexus; Moving to the inside and look what we’ve got here. Really!!! LED lights - thank you Toyota. Nothing in the back on this car but there might be on other models. Why? Well this one has a pan roof option - very nicely executed too. Nanoe-x climate, USB C’s, cordless charging and the usual layout.... Infotainment screen is big and bright although I noticed the rear view camera was a bit grainy. The sound is good. The vents are in a much more sensible place and we could feel them on the 12 mile return journey. It really is beneficial to leave the climate control in the auto position, oh and the app is far better than the Cross was and my Lexus, you can set any temperature and it’s all colour coded. You can also lock, unlock and set the hazard warning to help you find it in a dark car park. I thought I’d have a little look at those rear henges. Weren’t they two bolt fixings? These are single and they have been daubed in a thick coat of corrosion inhibitor. I think the problem was more chemical than rust in origin but we might learn more with time. The boot floor still has the stain from the electrostatic dip - that’s fine. I know, I know, you want to know about the battery. Well all I can tell you is that it has been changed but quite what to I’m not sure. The Mutlu has gone but there are literally no other markings in view and I didn’t think it fair to dismantle my friend's and more than I did to examine it. It looks very much like a different battery but I can’t tell you at this stage whether it is an upgraded Mutlu or something else - the stickers are at the back but you could see them previously. Something to discuss and speculate on!!! Engine layout is the same and still one single tiny vibrating disc horn. Might be my imagination but it did seem a bit more insulated to ride in. It also has safe exit assist to warn about passing cars and bikes. I would prefer Queen Boadicea extending blades to pass bikes but you know I’m a grumpy so and so.
    18 points
  9. It’s my first long distance road trip in my new Yaris, a 4 day break in Cornwall travelling from Herefordshire. The 240 mile trip down to St Erth was a breeze, impressive on the motorway, the adaptive cruise with lane control made driving extremely relaxed. Averaging 61.9mpg cruising at 70mph was impressive. We eventually arrived at Land’s End this evening in time to watch the sunset and whilst there was plenty of time to take some pictures of the sea views I couldn’t help taking a few of the Yaris. After 7 weeks of ownership I can’t fault it, it’s economical, fun to drive and effortless and comfortable on long drives.
    18 points
  10. Well it is in a few days for the Tsport, but I can't wait to tell you how it got on at the early(as in before it was due, not 6.00am)MOT today. I got it cleaned inside and out yesterday by the Bulgarians near Tesco's, and just as they do every time it goes in there, they were very keen on buying it. One of them even said he would buy it if it failed the MOT, they really like Yaris's there, there were two MK1s and a MK2 that the staff run. They took a lot of care cleaning mine over an hour or so, and made a pretty good job I reckon. So to the MOT station today, and I asked the tester if I could have a look for myself under the car while it was up on the ramps, surprisingly they said yes, what with me being a bit doddery on my feet, and elf and safety and all that. So I finally saw the underneath, and it's not bad at all, the surface rust that I was a bit worried about,is just that, no rot, and overall very clean under there. No worse I would think than a 5 year old car subjected to UK roads. No problems with emissions, brakes, anything at all, apart from the driver's side wiper blade being split at the bottom, soon sorted with a £8 Bosch one from europarts next door. So again another pass, so very happy with this remarkable little car once again.
    16 points
  11. Picked mine up today. First ever Toyota so I have nothing to compare it to but it is very nice so far and more than enough power for what I need
    16 points
  12. With great sadness we have parted with our lovely bZ4X after only six months of use. We have suffered a substantial five figure loss. It is a great shame, as the car was brilliant in so many ways. Quiet, comfortable, super good road holding, a great infotainment system, and more... The entertainer Rowan Atkinson says he feels duped by electric cars : https://cardealermagazine.co.uk/publish/rowan-atkinson-feels-duped-by-electric-cars-and-believes-used-cars-are-the-future/285057 Whatever Rowan's reasons are , here is our reasoning : 1. Absolutely unviable charging infrastructure broken chargers that just do not work chargers located where there is no phone signal major motorway service stations with only two chargers for 1000 plus cars chargers that only work with certain cars, and more... 2. Range: we NEVER achieved anything close the claimed range, even in warm weather, ECO mode, no AC etc. and very careful driving. Our best was about 180 miles vs WLTP of 285. 3. Energy costs: these have risen hugely, the cost of charging an EV at public chargers, if you can find a working one, is now considerably more expensive than petrol. 4. Car Tax: despite offering incentives with zero road tax, this will now end in about 18 months and the car will be liable for road tax To be honest we could live with the range, in practice with care and planning, it was workable. The car tax was always going to happen and is perhaps only fair to other ICE owners. Even with massive increase in energy costs since we ordered the car in early 2022, the hope would be they would reduce again over time. But the deal breaker was not being able to reliably know you could get the car charged on the move. A car is for convenience, safety, reliability and of course driving pleasure. When is becomes nothing but stress and worry, and not being able to reliably know you can safely reach your destination, then you have to admit defeat, and a lesson ( expensive lesson ) learned. The silver lining is our new RAV4 PHEV is amazing !!
    16 points
  13. Hope everyone are doing well :) I finally managed to send back the car to the dealer. They agreed to refund me for the car as well as the delivery fee, so I need to only bear the cost for the return delivery. Not too bad an L after all. In the meantime, I also managed to find a car through the local Toyota dealer. This time around, made sure everything is rust-free or at least has minimal rust. Checked everything else too and did a test drive before buying the car. It's a 2018 Yaris but hopefully not as bad as the one I bought previously. Thank you everyone for sharing lots of advice and experiences. Definitely helped me when viewing this second car. And looking forward to LK-99 solving the EV car problems soon
    16 points
  14. Sorry everyone for the delay to get back here. My daughter fell sick so had to put everything else down the list of priorities. However, I have been able to speak to the dealer again and they seem to dodge the rust issue as expected. They have apparently talked to Toyota about this and been told that the warranty does not cover surface rust. Tell me something I already didn't know lol. Anyway, I took everyone's advice here and told them that I will be returning the car. Might need to take the loss for the delivery to and fro as a result, but don't want to be stuck with a car that's going to cause a lot of problems in the near future. I will update you once I hear back from the dealer. Now onto the things that need to be done for the car return and possibly start looking for another car soon.
    16 points
  15. £0 monthly payments since 2018 and couldn’t be happier 👌 No matter what car you have or in what house you live, there are only two different types , your really own - paid off and the financing ones- rent, mortgage. There is nothing better than owning something without need to pay someone every month. The best of Toyota ownership comes after you finish paying for your new car and keep it for many more years afterwards. You will enjoy relatively recent car 3-5 years old, owned and taken care by yourself, same car, same power, efficiency, reliability, drivability but no monthly payments. Plus after the manufacturer warranty expires, if you understand cars and have a driveway you can easily maintain the car by yourself and save tons of ££££ without worry about visiting dealer or other garages, like older days. 🏁👍
    16 points
  16. @coreye9090 who wants to get on abus/tube and risk catching some horribledisease. 🤮 🤧 💀 it’s not just that, I was on the bus the other day and a woman got on with a young baby, she then began to breastfeed it, the baby was a bit reluctant to feed so the lady said “ come on now, if you don’t eat up I’ll give it to that nice man” ten minutes later she said again, “ come on now, if you don’t eat up I’ll give it to that nice man, “ another ten minutes went by and she said it again, “ come on now, eat up or I’ll give it to that nice man” , I’d had enough by now so I went over to her and said, “ I wish you’d make up your mind mrs, I should have got off three stops ago”….
    15 points
  17. Hi everyone, as many of you know I have been driving my Auris with a dead battery for some time now this week I had replaced the hybrid battery myself. I bought a new battery from Toyota dealer ( Steven Eagell St. Albans) for £1448. They quoted 3 hrs labour at £487 which was exactly the time it took me to do the job by myself on my driveway saved me these money. The replacement process is very easy, no special tools or equipment are needed, no high voltage gloves or anything other protection wear. You need only a good quality tool set with 1/4 and 3/8 wrenches with sockets 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, two extension bars, long and short, and must have interior panels remover tool, aka clip remover., there are many clips you need to undo. The battery itself comes in a nice box, it is 46 kg weight so you will need help from a friend or do your English breakfast first 😉 I had used this video as tutorial how to , even I made it easier. Here some pictures from my work, the old, the new battery, the controls and electronics you need to transfer, the seat that you need to detach from brackets, maybe the tools you can see. The new battery is plug and play, it is also charged at around 50% or more, so no worries to start the engine. This new batteries seems to be re manufactured which includes new cells, new cables and sensors and new bus bars, just using old metal work, perhaps cleaned or re sprayed as it looks brighter colour. The warranty is 12 months. No mileage been asked about so I believe it’s unlimited. The important bit when buying a new hybrid battery from Toyota dealers in UK, you need to pay upfront at the dealer by card full amount £1448 + surcharge of £1032 for the old battery and when ready you have 20 days to return the old bay in the same box and they will refund the surcharge money. That’s pretty much all.
    15 points
  18. 2-litre Hybrid Touring Sport 5-door Excel 5 door CVT For the last 20 years, I’ve driven or owned 6 Skoda models and have enjoyed them all, as well as receiving excellent service from the dealers. Unfortunately, our last Skoda, an Octavia PHEV estate, was a disappointment. Everything was good: acceleration, comfort, style and economy: the real-world mpg over 11600 miles was 78mpg. However, it was plagued by software issues: numerous error warnings, Skoda Connect never worked and most seriously, the 12-volt battery dropped below 10 volts several times, meaning that nothing worked, including the door key, so I had to use the emergency key, open the bonnet and recharge the 12-volt battery. We liked the car so much that we put up with the failings, until I was due to go out urgently and the car would not start. I’d been looking at CarWow for offers on a Toyota Corolla and found exactly the model we wanted at a dealership 40 miles from home. I contacted them on December 6th, inspected the car on the 7th and collected it on the 9th. The CarWow price was more than £3500 below list and the offer for our Octavia was £1500 more than WBAC and as I’ve never wanted the hassle of a private sale, I accepted the deal. The car is the top of the range and as well as the usual features, it has a panoramic sunroof. My first Skoda had a sunroof and despite aircon, it’s lovely on a warm day to have the roof open to fresh air, so it’s a bonus. The car has many good points. The head-up display (HUD) is brilliant: it displays speed, the current speed limit and when the excellent satnav is in use, it projects details of the next junction. The primary controls are assessed by buttons or knobs, so for example, setting the temperature is done without the distraction of searching for an icon on a screen. The virtual instrumentation is good, because the display can be changed according to preference. Our last three cars have had a DSG, but the Toyota’s CVT is extremely smooth in operation and I am unaware of any disadvantages. The fuel gauge shows both the tank level and the remaining range. The auto headlight option automatically dips the headlights. The collision warning is a bonus,when I park the car in the garage. I’ve put a soft buffer on the central brick column, but when the HUD shows ‘BRAKE’ and stops the car, I’m just touching the buffer, so preventing damage. The automatic rear door opener concerned me slightly as our greyhound (the gorgeous Rosie) travels in there, but it’s not an issue because I open the door with the key fob, press on the door to stop it moving, grab her collar and then push the door the rest of the way up. I like having a 12-volt socket in the front of the car as well as the boot. The other main reasons for buying the Toyota are the company’s reputation for reliability and the 10-year warranty, as long as the vehicle is serviced by a Toyota dealer. I’ve taken out a service plan as it’s approximately equivalent to the cost of three years servicing and extends the roadside assistance from one year to three. The fuel consumption is about 40 mpg overall, but most of our recent journeys have been short runs to and from the supermarket. On a long run, we have averaged between 52 and 58mpg. After the first refuel, the real world mpg was almost identical to the car’s overall mpg, so it seems to be accurate. Conclusions: I was reluctant to leave Skoda, but their current range of vehicles are unsuitable for us. Another Octavia PHEV might have been an option, assuming software glitches had been sorted, but it’s not being made. The all-electric options are not acceptable as I like the option of refuelling quickly and I don’t like their clunky designs. The Toyota meets all our expectations, the design is lovely, everything has worked as it should right from the start and I can highly recommend the Corolla as being a wonderful car.
    15 points
  19. One year report on my bZ4X FWD (Motion) I’ve had my bZ4X for over a year now. Overall, I’ve been extremely happy with it. I kept records of monthly efficiency for exactly a year (until the new MyToyota app in Nov last year suddenly did not record efficiency…). There is always concern about range and efficiency when you buy a new EV so these numbers can be useful for those thinking of buying or as a comparison for others who already have one of the bZ4X models. These numbers were taken from the MyT app. Nov 22 to April 23 were on the original software. May to Nov 23 on the updated software which brought efficiency calculations in line with standard practice. You can see the improvement in efficiency as we moved into the summer months. The driving was a mixture of short/city trips, longer motorway driving and a 2000+ mile trip to France/Switzerland/Italy last summer. Annual Efficiency from MyT app: 4.51 ml/kWh, 22.17 kWh/100ml Annual Efficiency Calculated from actual charging kWh: 4.09 ml/kWh, 24.4 kWh/100ml (and yes, I did record every single kWh put into the car…) (Note that the difference between these two annual efficiency values above represents the losses during the charging process which for me are around 9.5% which seems typical of other reported values) Monthly efficiencies Nov 22 - 26.6 kWh/100ml (3.8 ml/kWh) 833 ml Dec 22 - 32.7 kWh/100ml (3.1 ml/kWh) 811 ml Jan 23 - 30.3 kWh/100ml (3.3 ml/kWh) 638 ml Feb 23 - 24.4 kWh/100ml (4.1 ml/kWh) 417 ml Mar 23 - 25.1 kWh/100ml (3.8 ml/kWh) 445 ml April 23 - 24.2 kWh/100ml (4.0 ml/kWh) 929 ml May 23 - 20.8 kWh/100ml (4.8 ml/kWh) 818 ml June 23 - 21.7 kWh/100ml (4.6 ml/kWh) 2181 ml July 23 - 21.3 kWh/100ml (4.7 ml/kWh) 707 ml Aug 23 - 21.0 kWh/100ml (4.8 ml/kWh) 835 ml Sept 23 - 20.8kWh/100ml (4.8 ml/kWh) 629 ml Oct 23 - 22.2 kWh/100ml (4.5 ml/kWh) 1000 ml What I have liked about the car are build quality, superb driving experience, quietness in city driving, comfort for long journeys. Even diehard petrolheads like the way it drives. Rear seat passengers often comment on the roominess. The software upgrade in May really helped with charging speed on rapid chargers. Its overall efficiency was much better than I expected and in line (or better than) similar sized EVs. There were a few negatives, but mostly minor things. The annoying “cannot Sync profile” which still appears occasionally. Misting up of inside of car on ECO HVAC setting in winter. 12V battery needs extra charging in winter. MyT app is very poor for those (like me) who would like more EV performance data.
    15 points
  20. I’ve only ever driven an auto once or twice, it was my ex brother in laws triumph stag, complete with overheating engine, that was back in the 80s, of course it’s all modern and high tech now so with that in mind, I think I’ve got this right…. D…….select this to drive in the daytime N…….this is for driving at night..obviously R……..race mode, can’t wait to see the looks on the faces of the drivers behind me P…….performance mode, obviously lowers the suspension and gives an extra 300 bhp, I wonder if it’s optional to wear a baseball cap back to front B……for going backwards, of course yes I’m going to look forward to my Yaris cross auto,
    15 points
  21. So here is my new Toyota yaris, got to say lovely to drive
    15 points
  22. I've just installed a small bear trap type device. Used for large rodents. Have put two under each wheel arch screwed down and one behind each headlight. I've added a paste made from Death Cap mushrooms and giant centipede venom. Seems like a reasonable quid pro quo.
    15 points
  23. This is a bit of a long post, so for the TL:DR folk (not that I blame you one bit) the summary is that I changed the 18-inch wheels on my YC Excel, to 3rd-party 16-inch wheels with all-season tyres. Result is significant reduction in road noise, better cushioning against our local abysmal roads and thus better bump absorption Right.... For reasons of no interest to anyone else, I need to have winter or all-season tyres available for the car. Various solutions - extra set of wheels (steel or alloy) with appropriate tyres, swap with original wheels when required. Or fit winter tyres to existing wheels and get local tyre place to store summer tyres and do the swap twice a year. Or fit all-season tyres to existing wheels, keep or sell the factory-fit Falken tyres. Lots of options, various costs, taking into account need to transfer the TPMS valves or buy another set, convenience to me etc etc. Your circumstances are likely different to mine, so what follows is my solution, may not be best for you. I'm just telling you what I did and hope that the information might be of some use/interest. My choice also reflects the truly atrocious roads where I live: council has pretty much given up repairs outside the cities and big towns, so it's not going to improve any time soon.... I looked at the cost of all-season tyres for the varying possible wheel sizes. For the 16-inch wheels, the 'official' size is 205/65, but it's perfectly legal to fit 215/65, which is a much more common size (205/65 is basically a van tyre) and hence cheaper tyres/more choice. I confirmed this change with insurance company, my dealer and the wheel manufacturer - see also https://www.willtheyfit.com/. A deciding factor was that for all-season tyres 215/65-16 vs 215/50-18, the former were about £50-70 cheaper (these prices may vary according to time of year, availability etc). Another factor is that 3rd-party wheels are hugely cheaper (~£100 each) than Toyota's (~£450). If you hit a pothole and wreck a wheel, good luck getting any £££ from the council I opted for 5-spoke Alutec Grip 16-inch 6.5J (ie matching official Toyota size) from Performance Alloys https://www.performancealloys.com/ who were extremely helpful in ensuring that the wheels did indeed fit (including the offset, the 'ET' value), their prices are good and tech support was rapid and helpful. Either they or Alutec also included the correct wheels bolts (as well as centering rings): Toyota use flat washer type nuts, most alloys have 60-degree head angle nuts, so reusing Toyota nuts isn't possible. Also meant that I needed to buy a set of locking wheel nuts, my local Halfords sold me McGard 24212SU nuts (Performance Alloys also sell them) Since I was visiting Reading, I got the work done there (JustTyres). They were happy to swap the TPMS valves to the new rims, I opted for Goodyear Vector 4-seasons Gen3 based on price, availability, reviews. I can confirm that with a bit of care, the original wheels/tyres will indeed fit in the back of the YC, seats down of course. Re-tracing my route home, the difference in ride was very, very noticeable - the 'balloon' tyres really take the edge off the scarred roads. Bonus is the (expected) significant reduction in road noise and the filtering out of the 'buzz' from the road texture - even SWMBO noticed the change (!). No discernible fuel economy penalty, stats so far suggest a slight improvement, but that could be spurious. Really very pleased with the outcome The original wheels/tyres are now happy and warm in my garage. As with a previous car, when I sell, I'll put the originals back on (of course) and sell the 3rd-party wheels/tyres, that was very successful last time and someone in the wilds of Scotland is the proud owner of some Borbet wheels with Michelin CC+ on them Here are some photos: if you think the new wheels/tyres are fugly, I respect that, but I don't care - I have the aesthetic sensitivity of a !Removed! stormtrooper (and also the appearance, according to SWMBO, harsh but fair). When I took the car to the dealer to have a Noco lead attached to the 12V battery, both the salesperson and technician nodded approvingly, the latter said "Yeah mate, roads round here, you need all the rubber you can get". Indeed My time in the EU and elsewhere tells me that big wheels with low-profile tyres are a much more common affectation in the UK, despite their roads (generally) being in a lot better condition than ours
    14 points
  24. Just off to get it but I always like the returning car to not be an embarrassment so it’s had a quick clean up. It’ll make somebody a cracking little motor. I’ll show you the new one real soon.
    14 points
  25. 🎄To celebrate Christmas and New Year, members are having a virtual gathering on Friday 22nd December at 8pm 🎄. As suggested by members in the Electric Scooters topic (General Discussions), the gathering is open to all members, who are invited to 'bring their own', whether Guinness or other beverage. Members can use this topic to celebrate together. Hope to see people on Friday to say 'hello' and to raise a glass, or two, in celebration of the seasonal break. Best Wishes - Mike
    14 points
  26. At first I thought this was a wind up that someone could have so much difficulty understanding or even needing to understand the need for services or just what the service consists of. My patience ends when the snowflake card is played and the threat of unsubscribing pops up. If the op not understanding hurts their feelings, that’s their problem and I’m not walking on eggshells for fear of upsetting them. The bottom line is - your car is due for service whether you like it or not, whether you think it isn’t or not, whether you think you might be being ripped off or not. If you don’t service it and you ruin it or end up voiding your warranty, don’t come wittering to us. Welcome to owning your own car, you have to do these things OR….. you don’t but you suffer the consequences. If you want to know exactly what you get for your money, read the service book. It’s in the schedule above too. I’ll summarise; interim service is oil change and kick tyres, full service is oil change and other stuff depending on mileage. Now I’m upset about somebody threatening to unsubscribe and might unsubscribe myself, how about that.
    14 points
  27. Since joining the forum and collecting my Yaris Cross Design in December 2022, I promised that I would submit a 6 month review on my ownership experiences in June 2023. Well, for various reasons I have not had the chance to do so and now that I’m confined to the house over the next few days on doctors orders, this would be an opportune time to do so. As my loyalty to VW/Audi came to an end because neither company had a smallish self charging hybrid in their range that would suit my individual needs, I was drawn to the Yaris Cross Design with it’s good looks and having the famous Toyota reliability badge of honour and excellent customer reviews. Here’s what I found. The Design model was my choice as it had a range of features and equipment that I was generally looking for. The car’s appearance and exterior design is very sleek, modern and has a real purposeful look about it. The interior is well thought out and the ergonomics of the dash area really impresses me. The cabin is light, spacious for the driver and front seat passengers but it can get a little cramped for rear seat passengers on the odd occasion that I have transported them. For me, the drivers seat lacks sufficient support on the left lateral cushion but my wife has no problems with it. Other than that, the interior is a very pleasant environment with excellent all round vision and it’s as good as any car that I’ve driven. Boot space is more than sufficient for my needs and there’s nothing more than I can add to this. I thought that moving from cars with DSG gearboxes to an ECVT system might be a bit of a challenge never really arose. The Yaris box really is good but I know some people who poo poo it as they still compare it to the old 70s Daf cars with the big rubber bands in the engine bay. One of my neighbours has now been enlightened and ordered a Yaris Cross Design model over the weekend. The 1.5 engine has plenty of oomph and I’ve never felt it lacking in power or stamina over the very hilly area where I reside. It’s not the quietist of engines but the radio has a handy little volume button to address this phenomenon. Surprisingly, despite it’s relatively tall stance, the Yaris is more than capable of remaining stable and sure footed with very little body roll over the country roads surrounding me. Some folk on the forum have raised issues relating to the battery losing it’s charge but I’ve never experienced this. In fact, I left my car exposed to the horrible Scottish weather for a six week period in January/February while I was visiting my daughter in Australia. Despite strict instructions to my youngest son to put the car into READY mode every week, he felt that a one off “boost” would be sufficient. Turns out he was correct as the car started first time on my return. However, the brake discs were covered in rust which required a slow drive with my left foot on the brake pedal while accelerating on a quiet road nearby. Worked a treat and brought the discs back to showroom condition. I’m off to Australia again in November but this time I’ll be there for 3 months and I’m a little more apprehensive and doubtful whether my previous actions will be sufficient to keep the battery in a useable condition. I’d be more than happy to receive any advice on this matter. My Yaris is parked in a residents car park which is nearly always in shadow. Where this car really excels is it’s incredible fuel consumption. My last 3 fuel top ups have shown over 70 mpg on every occasion. It really is amazing when you consider that most of my journeys are quite short in a semi rural environment. On the odd occasion that I’ve ventured onto motorways fuel consumption does suffer once you reach the 70mph limit so I’m wondering if it’s the best car for this type of driving. Nevertheless, the Yaris Cross has been an excellent purchase for me and I now nominate it as the best car I’ve owned so far.
    14 points
  28. This is 'Celia' Loving her so far, she's had a run up to my parents and then came home through my local town.
    14 points
  29. Almost all 12v car batteries are lead acid; Even AGM ones are and can also give off hydrogen gas if they are e.g. overcharged, which is why Toyota put vent tube in ones that live inside the car, to vent it outside (Which seems a bit overkill, as the battery would have to be charged so hard it's practically on fire to generate enough hydrogen to be even a slight danger to passengers, but people do seem to get very paranoid about such things!) The only reason AGM is used is it's safer to handle - They don't mind being upside down and won't leak sulphuric acid everywhere, unlike normal flooded batteries. Even if the casing is breached, there is so little acid it will just smoke a bit rather than spill its guts out on everything. (This probably goes without saying but if you do see a smoking lead acid battery, get away from it - That 'smoke' is probably sulphuric acid reacting with the water in the air, and you really don't want to breathe that in! )
    14 points
  30. Finally, have mine. 11 months after order at dealer.
    14 points
  31. Something that is missing from this thread is a bit of balance. How about his? There is a place for both the 1.8, AND the 2.0. I own the latter, but have experienced both. The 1.8 is ‘adequate’ and especially suitable for the more sedate driver, who isn’t bothered about performance, and would rather save a few £, and take a more relaxed pace. That’s fine, and probably a majority of Toyota hybrid owners. The 2.0 is has much more torque, and surprising performance - contrary to some beliefs, that is relevant, especially if you drive on the motorway with a few passengers or cargo. The 2.0 is more effortless - you don’t have to dig as deep into the pedal travel, and can accelerate with traffic without even breaching the eco zone, and without the slightest movement on the Rev counter. It circumvents much of the CVT traits that frustrate people. It has a bigger battery, and motor than the 1.8. The bigger battery (alongside dynamic force tech) I’m sure, is why it’s so good on fuel. That’s a big list of benefits over the 1.8. the key here is BOTH engines are relevant, and not one size fits all.
    14 points
  32. ..... that I am having to leave the Yaris Club thread - I am getting a new C-HR! . I placed the order with the dealer on 30th April and was told delivery would be in about three weeks. The dealer rang me this afternoon to say that it had arrived last night, so three weeks as stated. He said I could pick it up on or after Friday once they have fitted my 'extra' bits, so I have arranged to go and get it next Monday. I am calling it my birthday present to myself. 😀. Okay, I will still visit the Yaris threads - and the others.
    13 points
  33. Hi all - Monday was a big day for my 1998 Mk1 Avensis (1.8 7A-FE) auto. I clocked up 200,000 miles. It's been a great car in the 18 years I've had it and has been really cheap to run - I've always serviced it myself and taken it to my local garage for the things I couldn't do. Just thought I'd share this with the Mk1 fans out there. I'm planning on replacing it it later this year - I'll be sad to see it go. No doubt a few others can beat 200k?
    13 points
  34. Hi all, It looks like today my car turns 8 years old in my possession. On this date back in 2015 me and my family made a wonderful trip to Leicestershire and found our new( old) car in a small independent used car dealer. It was like unwanted one, back then diesels were the norm. Bought it cheap as chips and had a good discount too to accommodate new brakes and a new set of tyres. What a good motor, long years of services with almost no trouble at all and minimal maintenance costs. Well done Toyota. 👍
    13 points
  35. Just picked it up but cannot drive it because I have a back problem at the moment like the seats drive s well and smooth
    13 points
  36. Little update here. The car has successfully reached 250000 miles with very few parts replaced over than the regular service. However since last week there are faults discovered - front L stabiliser bar link is shoot and rubber bushes are ready for replacement, the front L wheel bearing also developed bad rumbling noise and most likely both hubs will go together with all fluids and oils sometimes next week or week after. It will be a big job, either a day in a garage or two days on the driveway, we will see what I can do first myself. Nothing last forever, but this car did exceptionally well. No Toyota stickers for the mileage this time, next reward sticker is at 300000 miles and this is what I am after.
    13 points
  37. Most on here in ten years will have an EV of sorts 😉 I can see the small EV market is going to be swamped in 5-10 years there are only a few on the market that are mainly all based on the PSA platform
    13 points
  38. Whether it’s a factory fault or transit damage, it’s completely unacceptable to hand this over to a customer as a finished product.
    13 points
  39. Hi Bob, I was thinking of posting "1 month in with my new YC" so your Q has prompted this My car is a YC Excel AWD. On the supplied 18-inch wheels and summer tyres, I did find the road noise a bit excessive and the car thumped badly over the local appalling roads' potholes and other imperfections. I changed the 18-inch wheels to 16-inch with all-season tyres and now the bump absorption is much improved, with a significant reduction in road noise as an (expected) bonus -see The overall ride (ie a function of the suspension, not tyres/wheels) is on the firmer side but is pretty good considering the size of the car and it's adequately comfortable even on our appalling roads. It also handles very well, and has light steering and is easy to manoeuvre in towns and car parks. The engine is a bit loud and vibratory when cold at certain rpm, but once cruising it's pretty quiet, acceptably smooth, no complaints: like many cars, wind and road noise dominate at higher speeds anyway. Sound from the standard infotainment system is decent, I've heard better but also far worse. DAB reception is surprisingly good - I sometimes drive in areas where the signal strength is weak, and the YC copes very well Economy - pointless for me to quote mpg because where, when and how I drive might be very different to you. But so far I'm seriously impressed, oh yes Interior storage could be better, but there are worse cars. I like the shelf under the infotainment screen, perfect for my phone, with a suitably short USB lead to connect to car I totally love the CVT gearbox - a previous car was a Skoda with VW's 'famed' DSG box, and it was lumpy at low speed, especially when cold, and at times unpredictable. The seamless, smooth CVT YC box is lovely, given my driving style and where I drive Seats - totally fine for me, but seat comfort is hugely personal. Love the overall driving position and SWMBO is very appreciative of the height-adjustable passenger seat (are you listening Honda?). The variable lumbar support also works well. Seat heating is easy, and wonderful dials for climate control! (unlike my VW 'main car' which is a BEV). Easy to fold mirrors in when required, indeed, mostly very intuitive controls Boot size is good, and lordy, wonderful, a 12V socket in the boot! Easy(ish) to remove the load cover, not yet tried the folding trick. Headlights are excellent, not up to matrix lights on our BEV, but a nice sharp cutoff and level beam, so looks like beam deflectors won't be needed for driving in the wonderful, prosperous EU I need a towbar for my bike carrier, and the YC's factory fitted one is, so far, proving to be very good (a separate review coming 'soon', I'll post photos) Niggles? The auto main beam switch...er.... what substances were they taking when they decided to put it down by the driver's right knee? Next to the switch for the heated steering wheel? Really? Auto dim-dip works as well as any car I've tried, ie better than most inattentive drivers, not as well as someone who's paying attention So, overall, yes, car meets our needs, refinement is up to expectation for the size and cost of vehicle. Acid test: if it got stolen or written off.... I'd almost certainly have another one
    13 points
  40. It was finally delivered yesterday afternoon, then looking for an excuse to drive it I popped out to pick up some horse feed only to bump into and have a catchup with Richard Johnson the famous jockey. While he could boast around 20 bags into his enormous Audi Q8, I realised I had brought the wrong car 😂 squeezing only 2 bags into the tiny boot of the Yaris. But who cares, I didn’t buy it for load lugging. I enjoyed the short 4.8 mile journey, drives better than I can remember and according to the app was doing 82.9mpg. It’s filthy dirty already, perhaps white wasn’t the best colour 😊
    13 points
  41. Perhaps best to do to find out how Honda hybrids drive is to book a test drive and see if you like it or not, you can do your comparison in person and you can share with us later. Auto journalists already started to like Honda more , but they never liked Toyota hybrids anyway. 👍 For me Honda hybrids are fake cars. If you want a simulator car then they are ok. I like Toyota hybrids for what they are and how they drive. I don’t want something that is a modern car but actually faked the old technology and produce fake noises and simulated gear changes. Why would you take that over something completely different, smooth, quiet, relaxed and reliable. Also any other hybrids to date including latest from all manufacturers are more complex than their petrol or diesel equivalents , so full stop for me. Toyota hybrids and the Electric cars are taking over because of simplicity, reliability, comfort, ease of drive, minimal maintenance etc. You want some gears and f..rts there are golf R, Audi s3 , bmw s plenty, and they will do much better job for what they had been made. 👌
    13 points
  42. It's finally here! And well worth the wait. I'm really impressed. Was a bit worried as to how it would be on the motorway after the last couple of cars I've had being big diesel Mercs, but it's absolutely fine. It almost drives itself with adaptive cruise and lane trace switched on. Averages 55-60 mpg without even trying. Great purchase 🤑
    13 points
  43. Apologies to all. I realised yesterday that I am just being paranoid and ridiculous after reading posts from people having problems with their batteries. At the end of the day, a flat battery would be nothing more than a minor irritation. I have got a Noco battery pack, jump leads and RAC membership which I think are the only sensible things I need to sort out any problem. All I am going to do is charge the battery once a week, park my car in the garage again and get the battery monitor fitted when the car is serviced. Other than that I will just drive and enjoy it. Thank you to all the people who have reassured me. Enjoy the rest of your Christmas and have a happy New Year Best wishes Chas
    12 points
  44. My dad used to smoke and lose power when he came home from the pub….🤭
    12 points
  45. No we don't. The Club is largely managed/moderated by volunteers - currently a team of two, including myself. As we have other parts of our lives to lead, we certainly don't have the time or inclination to change how the Club operates, or devote more resource to managing media contacts, etc. I also don't think the vast majority of members want the Club to move away from a quite informal place, where members can seek and give advice to others.
    12 points
  46. To understand the principle difference between disc brakes and drum brakes in terms of why they are favoured these days, you need to understand the physics of it. It is about the relationship between friction and output. I could sit and draw it but I’ll try to explain. Due to weight transfer, the front brakes need to take on more work because between 60 and 70% of the work is done by the front. You can do it with drum brakes by having bigger on the front than the back or just piston sizes of the wheel cylinders. Drum brakes have a self servo action, in other words the shoes try to wrap around with the rotating drum and this can be used to advantage and increase output. However, there is a big disadvantage. The variable is the friction level for the brake lining which can be very high when cold or very low when hot because they fade with high temperature (the surfaces get lubricated with the oil based resin they are made from). To summarise, drum brakes are very badly effected by relatively small changes in friction. They do make a good parking brake because a little old lady doesn’t need to pull that hard because they self wrap like throwing a wedge under a door. Now think about disc brakes. They do not have a self servo action, the output is determined purely by the nature of the pad and disc and how hard you push them together. They have a very linear output and they are not effected by the same changes in friction that a drum brake does. Now you have to think about modern car braking requirements - trust me, they are extremely tough and it would take a while to type out a typical test procedure. The drum brakes are no longer capable of meeting front axle braking requirements. They won’t really meet the requirements for rear axles on higher powered, heavier cars - they have discs all round. You could use them all round on milk floats etc but not on the front of even modest cars so Aygo’s etc have discs on the front. Sure (brakes by the way ;-)). If we consider a normal healthy working brake rather than corrosion first. Disc brakes tend to operate in the range of about 100 to 500 degC. They will go much higher and work quite well at about 600 or 700 at which time the discs will glow orange but you start to get problems with the bond layer (the adhesive that glues them to the backplate) and the rubber parts on the slide pins don’t fair well either. So take 100 to about 350 as very typical and at these temperatures the pads work well with the disc. The pad is made from abrasives like silica and lubricants like carbon and together they provide stable friction through that temperature range. The pad is fitted together with a fibre - usually steel in all our cars but higher end might use ceramics. Ceramic probably isn’t what you think - they extrude fibres and then make the equivalent of the steel wool in our common or garden pads. You can do the same with carbon fibre and kevlar but while these posh fibres are strong when hot, they are very expensive. All pads are moulded together by some sort of oil based resin - that’s what stinks and smokes when hot. Under normal operation, the step based pads we use get hot enough to burn away the resin and constantly present the abrasives to the disc, as they wear they regenerate. Now come your bit. If they don’t get much use as in light braking or very low duty, they won’t wear away that resin and they stop wearing out. The resin no longer gets worn away and the abrasives tend to get lost in a polished surface that gets clogged with wear debris. You hear it called glazing but that is the next very extreme stage where the surface literally gets polished like a glass surface. That is the “ordinary” low use effect. Now a disc brake or a drum brake for that matter is like any other machine, if you put it in grubby environment with little use it will size up just like an old farm gate that never gets opened. On top of that you get a lot of corrosion if moisture is present and now you can get a compounded effect of low friction, corroded surfaces and seizing up moving parts. The end result is inevitable. The bottom line is, you design it to work for the majority at 100 to 350 and if you take it high you burn away that resin and wear them out quick. If you use them very light duty they shut down. If you use them as intended they work fine, the surfaces remain bright and the parts don’t seize.
    12 points
  47. He should have taken the money and run. I’d rather have an illness than an Evoque.
    12 points
  48. To be fair £645 for a RR is not enough, it will be on the back of a recovery truck on a daily basis
    12 points
  49. My new Corolla 2.0L Touring Sports Excel was delivered today. Very pleasantly surprised. Predicted to give 7/10 actually awarding 9/10 Positives? More comfortable driving position than anticipated, sports seats cuddle you! Quieter other than a little wind noise. Comfortable suspension, although will check tyre pressures. Having test driven 1.8, so glad I chose a 2.0L, more relaxed drive,more responsive. The CVT is less obvious too and only rears it's ugly head when you accelerate hard. Lots of room in the boot, like the red trim. Headroom is not as restricted by the panoramic sun roof as I thought. Controls are logical. Negatives? MY21.5 not MY22. The labelling on the buttons poor, need a torch to read them! Went to get more petrol and realised I did not know how to open the fuel cap!! Had to look it up on the internet.
    12 points
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