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Us Court Denies Parents Custody Of Hitler And Sisters

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A US appeals court has ruled a couple who gave their children Nazi-inspired names should not regain custody, citing the risk of serious injury to them.

Adolf Hitler Campbell, 4, and his sisters, JoyceLynn Aryan Nation, 3, and Honszlynn Hinler Jeannie, 2, were taken from their New Jersey home in 2009.

The case first came to public attention in December 2008 after a shop refused to decorate a birthday cake for Adolf.

A family court had earlier found there was insufficient evidence of abuse.

But on Thursday, the appeals panel determined that social workers had proved the need for protective services for the three children.

The panel found that the parents, who both suffer from unspecified physical and psychological disabilities, had "recklessly created a risk of serious injury to their children by failing to protect the children from harm and failing to acknowledge and treat their disabilities".

The judges also noted that Deborah Campbell had recently passed a letter to a neighbour saying her husband had threatened "to have me killed or kill me himself".

The children's father, Heath Campbell, told the Associated Press last year that he believed they were taken into foster care because of their names.

He also alleged that the authorities had relied on unproven accusations made by a neighbour and his ex-wife.

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Irrelevant, but when did that ever bother me ? :rolleyes:

Revealed: How an Irish soldier saved Hitler's life

By Brian Whelan and Michael McHale

Friday August 06 2010

The family of an Irish soldier who saved a young Adolf Hitler and fought on both sides during World War I has published his memoirs after they were missing for more than 40 years.

The amazing wartime tale of Dubliner Michael Keogh began when he joined the British Army in 1914 and won the George's Cross for bravery before being captured by the Germans in 1916.

While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism, to join them.

The detailed accounts of Mr Keogh's life, written after his experiences, mysteriously disappeared while he was on his deathbed in James Connolly Memorial Hospital in Blanchardstown in 1964.

According to his son Kevin (84), who lives in Swords, north Co Dublin, a man "dressed as a priest" took them from under his pillow two days before he died. The files were eventually found in the UCD archives and given back to the family in 2004.

The memoirs report a chance encounter with a young Adolf Hitler that changed the course of history.

Shortly after the Great War, while Mr Keogh was staying in Munich to fight against the Communist rulers who had declared a short-lived Bavarian Soviet Republic in April 1919, he recalls how he led a military operation to save the life of the future German tyrant.

He had earlier met Hitler in September 1918 near Ligny on the French Border, where the pair were in the same Bavarian Regiment.

In his memoirs he describes how, as the officer on duty during the anti-Communist revolution, he received an urgent call about a riot involving 200 men and two "political agents", one of them being Hitler, in a nearby gym.

"I ordered out a sergeant and six men and, with fixed bayonets, led them off on the double."

Mr Keogh explained that two political agents, who had been lecturing from a table top, had been dragged to the floor and were being beaten.

"The two on the floor were in danger of being kicked to death. I ordered the guard to fire one round over the heads of the rioters. It stopped the commotion."

The group of soldiers managed to haul out the two injured politicians.

"The crowd around muttered and growled, boiling for blood," he added.

"The fellow with the moustache gave his name promptly: Adolf Hitler."

"They had come to the barracks as political agents for the new National Socialist German Workers' Party."

- Brian Whelan and Michael McHale

Irish Independent

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While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism.

Always ready to jump ship when the going gets tough ohmy.gif

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While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism.

Always ready to jump ship when the going gets tough ohmy.gif

More educmacation coming up :rolleyes: Brace yourselves :yes:

Roger David Casement

(Irish name: Ruairí Mac Easmainn)

Roger Casement.jpg

Date of birth: 1 September 1864(1864-09-01)

Place of birth: Sandycove, Dublin, Ireland

Date of death: 3 August 1916 (aged 51)

Place of death: Pentonville Prison,

London, England

Movement: Irish nationalism

Anti-Imperialism

Major organizations: Irish Volunteers

British Foreign Office

Major monuments: Casement Monument at Banna Strand

Religion: Roman Catholic Convert

Roger David Casement (Irish: Ruairí Mac Easmainn; 1 September 1864 – 3 August 1916), (Sir Roger Casement CMG between 1911 and his execution for treason in August 1916, when he was stripped of his British honours),[1] was an Irish patriot, poet, revolutionary and nationalist. He was a British consul by profession, famous for his reports and activities against human rights abuses in the Congo and Peru, but better known for his dealings with Germany before Ireland's Easter Rising in 1916. An Irish nationalist and Parnellite in his youth, he worked in Africa for commercial interests and latterly in the service of Britain. However, the Boer War and his consular investigation into atrocities in the Congo led Casement to anti-Imperialist and ultimately Irish Republican and separatist political opinions.

[edit] Early life and education

Casement was born near Dublin, living in very early childhood at Doyle's Cottage, Lawson Terrace, Sandycove.[2] His Protestant father, Captain Roger Casement of (The King’s Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons, was the son of a bankrupt Belfast shipping merchant (Hugh Casement) who later moved to Australia. Captain Casement served in the 1842 Afghan campaign. Casement's mother Anne Jephson of Dublin (whose origins are obscure) had him rebaptised secretly as a Roman Catholic when he was three in Rhyl[citation needed] .She died in Worthing when her son was nine. According to an 1892 letter, Casement believed that she was descended from the Jephson family of Mallow, County Cork.[3] However the Jephson family's historian provides no evidence of this.[4] By the time he was thirteen, his father was also dead, having ended his days in Ballymena dependent on the charity of relatives.

Roger was afterwards raised by Protestant paternal relatives in Ulster, the Youngs of Galgorm Castle in Ballymena and the Casements of Magherintemple, and was educated at the Diocesan School, Ballymena later Ballymena Academy. He left school at 16 and took up a clerical job with Elder Dempster, a Liverpool shipping company headed by Alfred Lewis Jones, later an enemy on the Congo issue.[5]

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While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism.

Always ready to jump ship when the going gets tough ohmy.gif

He left school at 16 and took up a clerical job with Elder Dempster, a Liverpool shipping company headed by Alfred Lewis Jones.

As soon as he was old enough he was straight on the boat to the motherland thumbsup.gif

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While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism.

Always ready to jump ship when the going gets tough ohmy.gif

He left school at 16 and took up a clerical job with Elder Dempster, a Liverpool shipping company headed by Alfred Lewis Jones.

As soon as he was old enough he was straight on the boat to the motherland thumbsup.gif

The Evil Step Mother strikes again :fear: Pax! I'm broadminded enough to accept any Nationality :group-cuddles: I don't even except inhabitants of Surrey :angel_not: They have enough problems without that :sneaky2: :lol2:

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While in captivity he was persuaded by members of the Roger Casement Brigade, a group formed to recruit Irish soldiers to fight against the British as a display of Irish republicanism.

Always ready to jump ship when the going gets tough ohmy.gif

He left school at 16 and took up a clerical job with Elder Dempster, a Liverpool shipping company headed by Alfred Lewis Jones.

As soon as he was old enough he was straight on the boat to the motherland thumbsup.gif

I'm broadminded enough to accept any Nationality group.gif

Except the French censored.gif

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I infer from all these Francophobe rants :unsure: that some French Damsel broke your heart :crybaby: ......................If you have one :rolleyes: Tis rumoured that you haven't & in place of it is a swinging brick :lol:

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No, there is nothing wrong with France a superb country, wonderful produce and great wines...

It's just the people that suck thumbsup.gif

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No, there is nothing wrong with France a superb country, wonderful produce and great wines...

It's just the people that suck thumbsup.gif

Suits you Sir! :yahoo:

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