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Aygo Rear Hub / Bearing Removal Advice Needed..


Mr_Chas
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Hello everybody

I haven't been here for a long time - mostly because my Aygo has given me such trouble free service up till now! I'm after some advice now, however.

I'm replacing a worn rear bearing on the driver's side. The drum is off, and I've removed the four bolts on the rear of the plate (that look like they're all that holds the hub in place) as well as the abs sensor. The hub itself is still stuck firmly in place for some reason. Before I set about it with a mallet, I thought I'd be as well to ask on here whether there is anything else holding it in place. It looks as if it should come out without needing to disturb the brake shoes - is that right?

Anyone have any advice to offer?

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Hope you've sorted your problem, I did look it up and it was removed abs sensor from the back, four bolts on the front, lightly tap and remove.

How did you get on ?

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Hi. Thanks for your reply. I tried lightly tapping it yesterday. No luck. Today, if the weather clears up, I will be trying the 'hammer the b'jesus out of it' method.

Is that from the Haynes manual? I've always found Haynes world never has any corroded-together-parts in it. Wish I lived there!

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Yes from the Haynes manual, I saw your thread yesterday and It only dawned on me today I have a manual in the shed. It will only be corrosion hold it on, if you have undone all for bolts and removed abs sensor.

As suggested on another forum you visit, with the drum off put the road wheel back on and give it a tug and a wiggle, just make sure you don't catch the bearing hub on the brake shoes.

If you don't fancy the idea of putting the wheel on, put the brake drum on back to front and pull or tap on that, good luck.

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Thanks Unc. I've tried most of the things I've had suggested (I dont currently have a blow torch) and I've finally lost patience so off to the mechanics it goes.. bit of a blow to my manly pride but i'll bounce back with the support of my loved ones. :(

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Hmm....how about spraying WD40 around the bolt holes and around the hub and came back to it in the morning .

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Well, I soused it in plus gas last night.. I really think I'll pay someone else to bust their nads on it. I can't remember being defeated like this before but I've had enough of it this time.

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  • 1 year later...

So I'm not the only one with problems removing the rear bearings then. I've even just bought a slide hammer kit, bolted it to the hub and it still won't shift the things.

Just about had enough of corrosion/siezure problems on the Aygo now. The front suspension was a nightmare, now I'm having big issues on the back. Aside from putting it into Toyota I've run out of ideas. Not sure how even they will get them off to be honest, maybe theres such a thing as a pneumatic slide hammer in their toolstore. I am simply staggered that everything I touch on this car is siezed solid.

Anyone got any better ideas?!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Best way to remove the rear wheel bearing is to use two lengths of M10x1.5 stud as a puller. Position at 180 degrees from each other and locate on the brake backplate where convenient.

You could use the wheel bolt thread size for the stud, but it's M12x1.5 and a non-standard thread, so difficult (and expensive) to source.

Remove the wheel and drum. Release the bolts to the rear of the hub and the speed sensor.

From the front, push a length (approx. 150mm) of M10x1.5 stud through the wheel bolt hole. Add a washer and nut (M10x1.5) to the stud at the rear of the hub as the stud passes through. Then screw up fully by hand until the stud contacts the brake backplate. You may have to rotate the hub to find a good place to contact the backplate i.e. where it can locate without fouling any of the brake components.

Do this again to the bolt hole 180 degrees from the first.

You should have around 30mm of stud remaining on the outside of the hub. Add two nuts to the remaining threads and lock together; this so that you can prevent the stud from turning. Use a spanner/socket (17mm).

Now here's the clever part. When holding the outer nuts, undo the inner nut i.e. turn it anticlockwise as you're looking at it from the outside. This will push the hub away from the backplate and pull it out of the bearing carrier.

Try this at 1/2 turn on each of the two studs to remove the hub evenly.

It's a bit of a pain, and the inner nut does go very tight (lube the thread), but if you're careful and methodical it will come off. I've tried using a hammer from the rear and it didn't work.

Clean the area thoroughly before fitting the new hub/bearing. Use some form of anti-seize lube on the bearing carrier and new hub (to make it easy to remove next time). New hub should pull into place with the original retaining bolts. Don't forget the speed sensor.

And adjust the brakes prior to refitting the drum as it will bring the handbrake lever back to normal (the self adjusters rarely work and the handbrake suffers as a result).

Worked for me, took around 45mins per side. Both rear hubs lasted 85k miles. Fronts still ok at 105k. Still on original clutch and water pump!

Good luck.

Andy from Marown, Isle of Man.

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  • 4 years later...

wondering what size are the bolts on the rear wheel hubs. 

need to camber rears and plan on doing this with washers but need to hub bolt size to get correct washers 

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  • 5 months later...
On 6/28/2015 at 10:52 PM, KingOrry said:

Best way to remove the rear wheel bearing is to use two lengths of M10x1.5 stud as a puller. Position at 180 degrees from each other and locate on the brake backplate where convenient.

You could use the wheel bolt thread size for the stud, but it's M12x1.5 and a non-standard thread, so difficult (and expensive) to source.

Remove the wheel and drum. Release the bolts to the rear of the hub and the speed sensor.

From the front, push a length (approx. 150mm) of M10x1.5 stud through the wheel bolt hole. Add a washer and nut (M10x1.5) to the stud at the rear of the hub as the stud passes through. Then screw up fully by hand until the stud contacts the brake backplate. You may have to rotate the hub to find a good place to contact the backplate i.e. where it can locate without fouling any of the brake components.

Do this again to the bolt hole 180 degrees from the first.

You should have around 30mm of stud remaining on the outside of the hub. Add two nuts to the remaining threads and lock together; this so that you can prevent the stud from turning. Use a spanner/socket (17mm).

Now here's the clever part. When holding the outer nuts, undo the inner nut i.e. turn it anticlockwise as you're looking at it from the outside. This will push the hub away from the backplate and pull it out of the bearing carrier.

Try this at 1/2 turn on each of the two studs to remove the hub evenly.

It's a bit of a pain, and the inner nut does go very tight (lube the thread), but if you're careful and methodical it will come off. I've tried using a hammer from the rear and it didn't work.

Clean the area thoroughly before fitting the new hub/bearing. Use some form of anti-seize lube on the bearing carrier and new hub (to make it easy to remove next time). New hub should pull into place with the original retaining bolts. Don't forget the speed sensor.

And adjust the brakes prior to refitting the drum as it will bring the handbrake lever back to normal (the self adjusters rarely work and the handbrake suffers as a result).

Worked for me, took around 45mins per side. Both rear hubs lasted 85k miles. Fronts still ok at 105k. Still on original clutch and water pump!

Good luck.

Andy from Marown, Isle of Man.

Thanks.

Tried your suggestion and it came off with ease.

Flemming

c1.jpg

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On 8/22/2013 at 11:39 AM, Mr_Chas said:

 

Is that from the Haynes manual? I've always found Haynes world never has any corroded-together-parts in it. Wish I lived there!

haynes only repair cars that aren't broken and everything is free and easy to remove

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  • 1 year later...

Hi .. I have a Toyota aygo 2007 . I change my two rear wheel bearing and now the abs light come on . When you park the car for a hour or so when you start the car the abs light goes off but as soon as the drive it and press the brake the brake sound like you are on ice. And when the abs light come on it don't make that noise like you are on ice. When the abs light don't come on and you brake ... the car sound like you are driving on ice... but when the abs light come on the car brake properly.  This happens when I change both rear wheels bearing.  Can some one tell me what is the problem.  Thanks 

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On 10/28/2021 at 9:53 PM, Rickey said:

Hi .. I have a Toyota aygo 2007 . I change my two rear wheel bearing and now the abs light come on . When you park the car for a hour or so when you start the car the abs light goes off but as soon as the drive it and press the brake the brake sound like you are on ice. And when the abs light come on it don't make that noise like you are on ice. When the abs light don't come on and you brake ... the car sound like you are driving on ice... but when the abs light come on the car brake properly.  This happens when I change both rear wheels bearing.  Can some one tell me what is the problem.  Thanks 

My guesses would be:

1. Speed sensor got damaged while changing the bearing. (High possibility).

2. New bearing have manufacture defect and did not work with the speed sensor. (very slim chances)

3. Problem with the car's computer (again very slim chances)

 

It all goes to how ABS (Anti-brake System) works in the first place.  The purpose of ABS is to ensure your wheels continues to move in the event of braking.  I know it sounds a bit confusing, but without ABS, the wheels CAN BE completely locked up and you will have NO CONTROL of the car in term of STEERING.

When the car's computer not getting speed signal from one of the wheel(s), it would seen it as one of the wheel is LOCKED UP thereby engage the ABS (with the ABS light on) trying to release the wheel.

The best way to diagnose the problem is to have a high level scan tool and read the live data from the car's computer.   Set it so it reveals the speed at each wheel.  Should one of the wheel's speed remains ZERO when you move off, you'll know which wheel you'll have to deal with.  Or throw in random parts by replace the 2 rear ABS wheel speed sensor (About £16 each) which is highly likely the be the causes.

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Have you had the abs scanned for codes ?? What was the reason for changing the both wheel bearings ? did you change the hub or just the bearings if it was just Bearings did you fit the correct ones and did you install them the right way around

Diagnose the issue before throwing parts at it

 

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5 hours ago, flash22 said:

Have you had the abs scanned for codes ?? What was the reason for changing the both wheel bearings ? did you change the hub or just the bearings if it was just Bearings did you fit the correct ones and did you install them the right way around

Diagnose the issue before throwing parts at it

 

Problem is: Nowadays, car diagnostics isn't cheap.  In UK, it ranges from £44 to 150.

I mean, I wouldn't blame the garages.  After all, they need to spent man hour(s) on it.  Plus the cost of the scan tool with ABS level will probably running into £400 to £2000.

For the cost of 2 rear speed sensors, that's well under the cost of a typical car diagnostic.

The rear bearing on Toyota Aygo MK1 is a single hub unit with 4 bolts screw to the back.  Speed sensor is then plug to the back of the hub held by a single screw.   I SUPPOSED he can first check to seek if the speed sensors were plug into the hub.  But other than that, there is very little chance the garage can mess it up (bearing can not be inside out).

 

 

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I have many obd2 tools and even a Techstream clone (£15) Vx diag (£80) up a Autel maxidas

Its not always the sensors that fail its the reluctor ring what's part of the bearing that tend to degrade/break up, if the sensors can be subject to water ingress - i may have changed an odd bearing or 2 over the past 20 or so years

Hubs can be a pita if they haven't been touched, the rust/corrosion can make a simple job turn into many hours

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