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Yaris lacquer peel


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I recently purchased a 2007 Yaris SR 1.8 in blue with 93,000 miles for £800. Why so cheap I hear you ask! It's because it's suffering from lacquer peel on the driver's door and the panel above the door (3 door). So my original intention was just to drive as is, without spending a penny. But, because it drives so nice and it looks nice in today's sunshine, it's making me think it could be worth spending some money on the cosmetics. 

Is it worth the out lay or not? There are the usual marks and stone chips present. 

I also recently became a premium member with the club and saved 15% on some autoglym products (20% off already) from Halfords. A new Battery on order as well, so I have already got my membership fee back, well worth supporting the club.

 

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I'd be interested in hearing what you use to sort it as my 2006 Yaris is suffering the same on the rear bumper, where the boot lid meets the bumper the laquer is lifting in places. I know it's plastic and obviously your door is metal but still similar issues.. 

I currently use G3 scratch remover and resin polish on mine, it works great on the slight scratches and stone chips which came with the car.

As for cost vs result personal choice at end of the day I'd say. If you intend to keep it and it drives fine then yes as if and when you come to sell it, it can only help the value, not to mention looks better while you own it as you've stated.

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I think the only way to deal with lacquer peel is to repaint the whole panel/part affected. In my case it's on more than one panel. I'm still undecided with what to do! Financially it doesn't make sense, which is why the previous owners probably didn't touch it. But the car enthusiasts in me is tempted.

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Gd point. I've gone for the cheaper option of buying a rear bumper guard to fit on top the bumper. Way cheaper than respray.. unless I can find a 2nd hand one In gd nick. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

My front passenger door was same, just one weird circle in middle of door, oh and all my alloys are goosed! paint/lacquer bubbling around centre caps. Seems to be a common thing with toyota alloys. Me dads rav4 and my uncle's landcruiser both have the same issue. 

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Toyota alloy wheels do have a bad reputation for not holding out too well. Polishing and waxing cars are the best way to look after your body work but my dad bought a new red corolla in 2001 and after 10 years the top coat started peeling in several areas. He use to wash and wax it regularly. I've heard it can be the pigment in the paint that reacts over time causing the top coat to fail.

9 hours ago, Wellsy18SR said:

My front passenger door was same, just one weird circle in middle of door, oh and all my alloys are goosed! paint/lacquer bubbling around centre caps. Seems to be a common thing with toyota alloys. Me dads rav4 and my uncle's landcruiser both have the same issue. 

Will you be spending any money on sorting out the paint/wheel issue? What colour is your yaris Gas?

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Red is one of the worst colours for fading, regular 'waxing' will maintain its appearance indefinitely, once the colour starts to fade though the only way back is to use abrasive polishes which has a 'cutting' effect on the paint which in turn reduces its thickness and if repeated too many times will cause permanent damage to the clear coat I'm not saying that this has happened to your Dad's car but what generally happens if the paintwork is not maintained correctly, that is one of the reasons professional detailers use 'paint thickness gauges'.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/14/2019 at 9:49 AM, stantheman1 said:

Red is one of the worst colours for fading, regular 'waxing' will maintain its appearance indefinitely, once the colour starts to fade though the only way back is to use abrasive polishes which has a 'cutting' effect on the paint which in turn reduces its thickness and if repeated too many times will cause permanent damage to the clear coat I'm not saying that this has happened to your Dad's car but what generally happens if the paintwork is not maintained correctly, that is one of the reasons professional detailers use 'paint thickness gauges'.

I'll attest to that, in the household we have a red Audi A2 and a red Seat Leon, both have considerable lacquer peel issues.

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On 3/24/2019 at 12:33 PM, dankernow said:

I recently purchased a 2007 Yaris SR 1.8 in blue with 93,000 miles for £800. Why so cheap I hear you ask! It's because it's suffering from lacquer peel on the driver's door and the panel above the door (3 door). So my original intention was just to drive as is, without spending a penny. But, because it drives so nice and it looks nice in today's sunshine, it's making me think it could be worth spending some money on the cosmetics. 

Is it worth the out lay or not? There are the usual marks and stone chips present. 

You might get a sprayer that could do the car for about £800, per panel price I had quotes for £200. On pure cost terms it may not be worth it but what price your enjoyment of a nice looking car?

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