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Cbatoday

New Corolla 2019 1.8 ordered

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Hi all this is my first post and just wanted to ask some info

Car will be the 1.8 hybrid. Does this model go upto 70mph on electric only or is that just the 2.0 litre model

Also can you fit a full size wheel in the boot. Dont like space savers or inflation kits

Do new Toyotas come with breakdown and recovery assist and if so how many years

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The Toyota new car warranty includes 12 months Toyota Roadside Assistance, which can be renewed as follows:

Toyota Roadside Assistance can be renewed or purchased for £7 per month on monthly Direct Debit. The annual cost is £76 as a single payment by Credit or Debit Card, we offer a discount when paying by annual Direct Debit reducing the cost to £72 per annum.

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1 minute ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

The Toyota new car warranty includes 12 months Toyota Roadside Assistance, which can be renewed as follows:

Toyota Roadside Assistance can be renewed or purchased for £7 per month on monthly Direct Debit. The annual cost is £76 as a single payment by Credit or Debit Card, we offer a discount when paying by annual Direct Debit reducing the cost to £72 per annum.

Thanks for the reply does this cover include taxis

Also forgot to ask. Is there going to be a software update on the infotainment system to include Apple play and android auto

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Toyota are looking at this - whether it is an update or otherwise, isn't known for certain.

As regards taxi use and roadside assistance, you need to check with Toyota GB.

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That depends what you mean. I have the 1.8 and the electric power can operate at up to 70mph but there isn't much benefit from it.

You might be misunderstanding what the electric power is all about. At low speed (less than 30mph) it can be the sole source of propulsion for a mile or two (enough to get you in or out of a town on your commute) but you have to be gentle with the accelerator(*). At higher speeds (less than 60mph) it can be the sole source of propulsion if the conditions are right (descending sections of road) but it won't climb hills and won't keep you going along flat terrain unless you let the speed drop off. And in any case at those speeds it'll run out of juice in half a minute or less. Above 60mph it will only help keep the car going on definite declines. It can't keep the car going on the flat at 70mph. At those kinds of speeds though the electric power is really only helping give the ICE a bit more flexibility about what RPM to run at. It will wake up occasionally at motorway speeds so is probably helping a bit but probably not making much real difference.

The thing about the Toyota hybrid system is that it's not about running around everywhere on electric power. Their system can do that for a short while and at low speeds can go a surprising distance like that but it's not what it's about. What it's about is reclaiming energy that would otherwise be lost during deceleration then using that energy to help the ICE work more efficiently. But make no mistake - it's an ICE car that has some electrical assistance. It is not a 'dual power source vehicle'.

As regards actual mpg - it's slightly better than I'd expect from a pure ICE vehicle but not hugely so. I've always been an efficient driver. My previous car was a Mk3 Honda Jazz CVT and I was averaging 49mpg in winter, 53 in summer, measured pump to pump. My Corolla started off in spring at ~53mpg and now appears to be managing ~58mpg. That's an improvement but nothing stellar. Now if you go by the dashboard you might be fooled into thinking it was exceptional since mine is currently saying 61mpg. But the dash display can be very inaccurate at times. What I don't know is how a less efficient driver (ie; a typical driver that uses their brakes to slow down, leaves braking until the last second and accelerates hard only to put the brakes on again) would benefit. It's possible that a typical driver might see more significant benefits from the hybrid system than I do. Then again such drivers could see significant benefits if they just learnt how to drive efficiently 🙂

(*)There is a switch that allows you to tell the car you want to stay on electric power for as long as possible. This will extend the range at lower speed. However it's generally considered a bad idea. All the power in the Battery comes from burning fuel in one way or another and the process of recovering that energy, storing it then sending it back to the wheels has losses. It's therefore not efficient to force the car to run on electric power. It's best to use that power sparingly to help the ICE. The ECU is pretty good at choosing when to do that but the driver can help by anticipating hills and similar.

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11 minutes ago, Cbatoday said:

This is where I read about the 70mph on electric but wasnt sure it's only available on the 2.0l hybrid

https://blog.toyota.co.uk/explore-the-new-2019-toyota-corolla-powertrains

"The maximum speed when driving in all-electric mode has been increased to more than 70mph" yes, that's probably true. However it's a bit disingenuous I think. The statement is correct in that the Corolla can switch the ICE off at 70mph and rely on the Battery for propulsion but it can't do it for very long and it can only do it downhill. The rest of the time the Battery can help the engine out a bit now and again (which might not be the case for previous versions of the system) which will have some benefits but probably not a huge amount.

At 70mph the ICE will be running 99.9% of the time and the electric power will switch on and off to help out a bit. But I doubt you'll spend more than .1% of the time running purely on electric with the ICE switched off at that speed.

But lest I sound too negative - I love the car. I've always been into efficient driving and the Toyota HSD gives me an additional tool to use in my never ending quest to minimise fuel consumption. I'm still learning tricks and the best ways to use HSD on my journeys. I'm also a bit of a geek and the technology behind HSD is very clever so that appeals to me as well.

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bought the car to use as my new taxi as 90% of my journeys are stop start town work where I believe the hybrids come into there own. my Skoda octavia diesel got written off 4 weeks ago and that had the usual egr and dmf filter issues. 

at the moment I am using a auris hybrid sports tourer and cant believe how quiet it is to compared to the diesel and the auto box is a god send when sat in traffic. this is what tempted me to buy the corolla sports tourer

would you say the new corolla is better than the now discontinued auris

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The second generation Auris is a re-work of the first generation dating back to 2007. The Corolla Touring Sport has a longer wheelbase (same as the Avensis and Prius) than the Auris, so should offer a bit more room inside.

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19 minutes ago, Cbatoday said:

bought the car to use as my new taxi as 90% of my journeys are stop start town work where I believe the hybrids come into there own. my Skoda octavia diesel got written off 4 weeks ago and that had the usual egr and dmf filter issues. 

at the moment I am using a auris hybrid sports tourer and cant believe how quiet it is to compared to the diesel and the auto box is a god send when sat in traffic. this is what tempted me to buy the corolla sports tourer

would you say the new corolla is better than the now discontinued auris

I had a 2015 Auris TS and now have a Corolla TS 1.8.  Things I have found between the two, around 30 or below the Corolla will stay in EV mode longer than the Auris, the Corolla is quieter than the Auris.  I preferred the drive selector of the Auris, overall very pleased with the Corolla

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Anyone know if a full size wheel will fit in the wheel well on the sports tourer

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9 hours ago, Cbatoday said:

bought the car to use as my new taxi as 90% of my journeys are stop start town work where I believe the hybrids come into there own. 

Ah, you should see some definite benefit from the hybrid then.

9 hours ago, Cbatoday said:

at the moment I am using a auris hybrid sports tourer and cant believe how quiet it is to compared to the diesel and the auto box is a god send when sat in traffic. this is what tempted me to buy the corolla sports tourer

would you say the new corolla is better than the now discontinued auris

I haven't driven an Auris. In fact this is my first Toyota :)

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Not to hijack the thread but whats the difference then between driving around normally or pressing EV Mode? does it just force more of the Battery to discharge and thats it?

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13 hours ago, Chattacks said:

Not to hijack the thread but whats the difference then between driving around normally or pressing EV Mode? does it just force more of the battery to discharge and thats it?

If available it will try and use EV for as long as possible, once the Battery gets as low as it will allow the engine will start and take over, power the car forward and re-charge the Battery.

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13 minutes ago, Sidrat said:

If available it will try and use EV for as long as possible, once the battery gets as low as it will allow the engine will start and take over, power the car forward and re-charge the battery.

Yup. And due to the losses involved in generating and storing the electricity it's a poor choice. It's useful for when you want the car to be quiet or want to impress spectators but otherwise it's best to let the ECU decide how to use electric power.

The best way to view this kind of hybrid technology is that it reclaims some of the energy lost during deceleration and can use it to improve ICE efficiency. It remains an ICE car and trying to pretend that it's an electric car is going to disappoint. I would be interested to know what kind of mpg figures other drivers get (pump-to-pump, not dashboard because of the inaccuracies I've seen) and differential compared to a traditional ICE car.

I suspect that an inefficient driver might see a bigger advantage than I do because my driving style minimises losses in the first place. And it's always better to avoid wasting energy than it is to reclaim some of what you waste.

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16 minutes ago, AndrueC said:

Yup. And due to the losses involved in generating and storing the electricity it's a poor choice. It's useful for when you want the car to be quiet or want to impress spectators but otherwise it's best to let the ECU decide how to use electric power.

The best way to view this kind of hybrid technology is that it reclaims some of the energy lost during deceleration and can use it to improve ICE efficiency. It remains an ICE car and trying to pretend that it's an electric car is going to disappoint. I would be interested to know what kind of mpg figures other drivers get (pump-to-pump, not dashboard because of the inaccuracies I've seen) and differential compared to a traditional ICE car.

I suspect that an inefficient driver might see a bigger advantage than I do because my driving style minimises losses in the first place. And it's always better to avoid wasting energy than it is to reclaim some of what you waste.

My previous Toyota, an Auris TS 1.8 that I purchased when it was a year old in 2016 I kept a record until I sold it last month throughout that time I averaged 53.7 MPG.  My distance to work was 10 miles so in the winter by the time I was at the end of my journey it had not long got up to temp.  I was quite satisfied with what I was getting for the engine size, the best I got for a tank full was 60.2 in the summer.  The indicated average for each tank usually read about 2-3 MPG more than what I actually got and this was constant over the time I had that car!

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Thanks for the replies. Best to not use EV mode at all then I guess (I've only every used it to impress passengers anyway). Since you are all more experienced hybrid drivers than me (this is my first)...Is it best to try and keep the acceleration so it doesnt go into the "power" part of the bar or best to just get up to speed more normally/briskly (not full throttle).

Fuel economy I haven't calculated manually but I did a 88 mile trip to Wales having set of early and got 82mpg on the cars trip computer for the journey (I left with plenty of time to spare and drove very sensibly) on the way back driving a bit more normally and keeping up with traffic still a respectable 72mpg again based on trip computer.

I also recently ran the car until the fuel light was on and it said 6 miles left in the tank and I filled it up with 37.13L but managed to squeeze in 38L before I decided I didnt want to overfill too much. Considering it has a 43L? fuel tank thats quite a bit left in reserve when indicating empty...so maybe even when empty probably 50 miles of fuel left?(mpg dependant of course)

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Typically Toyota allow a good reserve of fuel when the low fuel light comes on and the range approaches zero.

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As with most cars brisk but not crazy acceleration is best. Get up to speed quickly then hold constant speed. Anything between 2,000 and 3,000 rpm should do. That is generally below the pwr band indicated by the car.

Long journeys are where the dash display seems most inaccurate. I've known it say over 70mpg when pump to pump shows it to be 58. On my normal commute (12 miles each way, mostly free flowing 50mph single carriageway and a couple of miles of town driving) it seems to be fairly accurate (reporting 60 when it's actually 57). But if it ever reports anything much above 60 mpg I know to ignore it.

The information about the Auris confirms my impressions. The Corolla Hybrid is perhaps 10% more economical. Not terrible but not exactly world shattering. It's great fun to drive though 🙂

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I've just put a deposit down on a new Corolla sports tourer 1.8 hybrid. It hurts me paying nearly £10k a year of diesel, working as a taxi in a Ford tourneo custom. I'm looking at buying a house, hence the profits need to be higher. I can't a wait to start working this car, very economical motor.

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Well done mate, good choice. These cars are very popular in London and already plenty of them to be seen as PHV.  Good engine choice too. All the best 👍

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  • Club Hybrid Poll

  • 219 Hybrid Reliability

    1. 1. If you were to consider buying a Hybrid model over 5 years old, would you be worried about the reliability of the Hybrid system?


      • Not really as Hybrid systems are always reliable
      • Not if it had a Manufacturers Warranty on the Hybrid system
      • I would not buy a Hybrid model over 5 years old