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Is corolla really that economical


taxidriver50005
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My corolla 2.0 ts is in for a minor repair and insurance company has loaned me a kia exceed phev. 

Although not as refined as Toyota (6 speed gearbox with electric motor on outside) it is very economical and easily beats my corolla in economy stakes. 

Running in hybrid mode returns 67-70 without trying and if you run with the big Battery too 75+

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I have never got the my car does 50,60 70 mpg as it's a very very small part of running a car.

The main issue is always depreciation when you can lose £5000 or £10000 just driving it away from the garage what difference does it matter if your car does 40mpg or 60 mpg as the cost over the year on petrol is a fraction of that.

On top of that servicing costs can make a big difference and then insurance costs...no point getting 60mpg if your car costs double to insure to a similar car in it's class.

Also the amount of mileage and type of driving can make so much difference...my current car is 25mpg around town but 40 mpg on a long run.

I only drive 8000 miles a year so mpg is never my first choice on buying a car...i buy what i will enjoy.

I do think the 2.0 Corolla is a great car but whether it can do 50mpg or 60mpg would never enter my head when buying.

I get some people are obsessed with mpg like 0-60 times but other factors would save you more money.

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MC1216 is right, you have not factored in the cost of recharging the Battery, would probably still work out cheaper to run but you have to include the cost of purchasing a PHEV in the first place, also if it's got a DCT i'm not a fan i had an Ioniq great MPG but clunky gearchanges more so at low speed i think the 2.0 corolla is a good car for it's performance and MPG if you really want economy get the 1.8 corolla new model much improved and closer in performance to your present 2.0.

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34 minutes ago, Roy231 said:

MC1216 is right, you have not factored in the cost of recharging the battery, would probably still work out cheaper to run but you have to include the cost of purchasing a PHEV in the first place, also if it's got a DCT i'm not a fan i had an Ioniq great MPG but clunky gearchanges more so at low speed i think the 2.0 corolla is a good car for it's performance and MPG if you really want economy get the 1.8 corolla new model much improved and closer in performance to your present 2.0.

This is an interesting read if you want to do a cost comparison. 


https://allstarcard.co.uk/resources/ev-insights/charging-in-public-allstar-report

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To be fair, the 2.0 version is the performance variant - It'd be a little bit like a GR Yaris owner worrying why they only get 30-40mpg when the normal one gets 60-70.

The 1.8 is the economical one.

But the PHEV mpgs are all lies anyway - They don't factor in the electricity being used, so it's like if I put in 20L of fuel, then added another 10 without counting it, and claimed I could do 120mpg.

The only useful way you can compare different drivetrain types is p/mile - If you factor in the cost of electricity, esp. if it's from public chargers, that seemingly big advantage PHEVs have over HEVs is a lot smaller or even reversed.

 

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PHEV is for the person that doesn't want to own two cars. EV around town / daily commute, and Hybrid for long trips without having to recharge.

BUT nobody publishes MPG figures of their PHEV running petrol only i.e. after Battery is depleted on a longer journey. So I dismiss PHEVs as not being for me.

Taxi driver, are you saying the car does 67 in mild hybrid mode when Battery is completely empty? Incredible if so!

PS how many miles your 2L done so far? You were worried about injector issues?

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4 hours ago, MC1216 said:

I have never got the my car does 50,60 70 mpg as it's a very very small part of running a car.

The main issue is always depreciation when you can lose £5000 or £10000 just driving it away from the garage what difference does it matter if your car does 40mpg or 60 mpg as the cost over the year on petrol is a fraction of that.

On top of that servicing costs can make a big difference and then insurance costs...no point getting 60mpg if your car costs double to insure to a similar car in it's class.

Also the amount of mileage and type of driving can make so much difference...my current car is 25mpg around town but 40 mpg on a long run.

I only drive 8000 miles a year so mpg is never my first choice on buying a car...i buy what i will enjoy.

I do think the 2.0 Corolla is a great car but whether it can do 50mpg or 60mpg would never enter my head when buying.

I get some people are obsessed with mpg like 0-60 times but other factors would save you more money.

Well as I do 60,000 a year + fuel economy does interest me, price for a mid spec phev is same similar to mid spec corolla hybrid. No it won't hold its value the same but jf your a real high mileage user resale on a car with 300,000 plus miles is more dependent on condition rather than brand. 

I've used this car now without charging the main Battery and just using as a hybrid and economy wise it's impressive, not overly impressed in how the hybrid switches from one mode to the other or the fact you never really know how much power your going to get with a set throttle position as the system seams all over the place running between electric... Petrol... Or both together all giving different power levels and dif depending on what gear it's decided to be in.. 😳😳🤔

Toyota gets  bad rep for its hybrid brakes but they are far superior to this system. 

The kia brakes like a normal car until the gearbox has decided not to disengage the clutch when your coming to a stop a little juddering takes place until gearbox catches up with what it's been asked to do. 

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I'd choose the Toyota hybrid system over the Hyundai any day. The latter is a horrible design, worst of all worlds, GDI engine complex gearbox, clutches, cobbled together hybrid system with belt driven motor for heavens sake! I'd not want to own one long term. The 1.8 Toyota with port injection and that brilliant transmission for me! The odd bit of possible lower mpg doesn't matter compared to long term ownership reliability and quality. And phev vehicles have all the complex HVAC systems to go wrong too 

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On my 1.8 TS I've come to the conclusion that the worst economy is in cold, very wet weather at motorway speeds which for me is 60 to 70mph. In those conditions I get low 50's. In warm dry weather in traffic at low speeds it exceeds 60mpg.

I don't have a regular trip pattern, it's a random mix of slow traffic and motorway speeds. Over the last few months my tank average has been mid 50's. In summer I expect that to increase to 60mpg plus or minus a couple.

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With the recent weather improvement my '19 1.8 is now showing 64mpg on the dashboard (so probably more like 60mpg in reality). That's driving on rural roads and mostly journeys of 20 minutes or so.

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On 4/13/2024 at 11:44 AM, taxidriver50005 said:

My corolla 2.0 ts is in for a minor repair and insurance company has loaned me a kia exceed phev. 

Although not as refined as Toyota (6 speed gearbox with electric motor on outside) it is very economical and easily beats my corolla in economy stakes. 

Running in hybrid mode returns 67-70 without trying and if you run with the big battery too 75+

17129978343265160454731162876350.jpg

The post should be named as  -“Kia dashboard readings are they really accurate? “
75mpg on screen aren’t something unusual these days but in real world conditions and over a tank full of fuel things can be totally different. 
My colleagues showed me these high numbers but when asked honestly full to full consumption they often go down to realistic 50mpg. 
And yes 1.8 hybrids from Toyota are more efficient 

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3 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

The post should be named as  -“Kia dashboard readings are they really accurate? “
75mpg on screen aren’t something unusual these days but in real world conditions and over a tank full of fuel things can be totally different. 
My colleagues showed me these high numbers but when asked honestly full to full consumption they often go down to realistic 50mpg. 
And yes 1.8 hybrids from Toyota are more efficient 

My Corolla is the only car I've owned/driven long term where the dash MPG display is anywhere near accurate over a full tank. Most of my previous cars' fuel consumption readings were around 10% optimistic, with the notable exceptions being an Avensis 2.0 D4D and Peugeot 2.0 HDi, both of which had very pessimistic MPG displays. (The Peugeot being the worst, it used to report 20 MPG around town, when it was actually getting 40+ MPG! I think that's why the previous owner sold it cheap😆)

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All 3 of the Peugeot vehicles I owned in the past the average MPG readout / trip computer would stop working correctly if it wasn't reset once it reached 9999 KM.

I noticed this on two different models of Peugeot product, two built in 2003 & one built in 2016. 

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28 minutes ago, forkingabout said:

All 3 of the Peugeot vehicles I owned in the past the average MPG readout / trip computer would stop working correctly if it wasn't reset once it reached 9999 KM.

I noticed this on two different models of Peugeot product, two built in 2003 & one built in 2016. 

I used to reset the computer on mine every time I filled up but the fuel consumption readings were all over the place nevertheless! 

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My Corolla is the most fuel efficient car I've owned, having owned many diesels and petrols as well as an Auris and Yaris hybrid.

My typical journeys are the worst for fuel economy in any car, long motorway trips at a genuine 70mph yet the Corolla gets around a real 55mpg long term tank to tank.

Once I'm off the motorway mpg is higher, the hybrid system really works well in urban areas and on slower country roads. Even 60mph country roads speeding up and braking regularly gets good mpg, which would be low in most normal cars.

Plus the 10 year/100k warranty means low running costs as well.

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These figures may be of interest in comparing PHEV with self-charging hybrid and petrol cars. Our 1.5 litre petrol DSG Skoda Karoq averaged 31mpg and 18p/mile in fuel costs over the time we owned it. These figures are skewed because much of the time during lockdown we only did short journeys of around 8 miles a week to and from the shops. Our Octavia PHEV with a 1.4 litre 115kW petrol engine and  75kW electric motor averaged 78.5mpg with petrol costing 8.4p/mile over its time with us. On average e-power alone gave us about 25 miles range costing just over £1 to recharge the 13kWh Battery at Octopus Energy's half cost off-peak rate using a 13amp socket and a 10 amp charger. On one journey we were unable to recharge the Battery so on IC power alone we averaged about 50mpg. So far our Corolla has averaged 42.5mpg and 14.6p/mile in fuel costs. Our journeys are a mixture of short trips to the supermarkets, when the average can be as low as 25mpg and longer journeys where we've averaged up to 69mpg. However as Mark (MC1216) commented above, there are contributory factors in the mpg and costs. I have the Corolla permanently on the ECO setting, my driving style is defensive and relatively sedate and our annual mileage is currently around 5000 a year, so fuel costs are not as significant as depreciation, servicing and insurance. All mpg figures are based on my records based on filling the tank and noting the mileage. (I'm a spreadsheet nerd).

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To give an example of the Prius PHEV (2016-2023, XW50 with 8.9kWh battery), where there's more commonality on the underlying hybrid tech with new Corolla.

Petrol only, normal mode, driven carefully, it generally self-reports a consistent 60+ mpg on everything except really short <5 mile trips where it can be in the 50s.

Electric-only range is between 20-30 miles depending on speed, temperatures, weather etc. Worst in winter at higher speeds, best at low speeds and in summer.

Blended efficiency, measured just on distance and petrol fill-ups (the electric consumption is not included) is really only a measure of your personal mixture of journeys and the proportion of miles done on electric, but I'm finding I get a long term efficiency of around 140mpg with my journey mix.

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On 4/13/2024 at 1:58 PM, ThomasL said:

PHEV is for the person that doesn't want to own two cars. EV around town / daily commute, and Hybrid for long trips without having to recharge.

BUT nobody publishes MPG figures of their PHEV running petrol only i.e. after battery is depleted on a longer journey. So I dismiss PHEVs as not being for me.

Taxi driver, are you saying the car does 67 in mild hybrid mode when battery is completely empty? Incredible if so!

PS how many miles your 2L done so far? You were worried about injector issues?

Yes seam to be getting 65-70 mpg on hybrid only mode.. That's starting the day out with say 12% on Battery and finishing 200 miles later still on 12%.

My car now has 45,000 on so 12,000 after new injectors.. Ive no intentions of getting rid of it but found the loan car suprizingly economical, I would not buy one as it far less refined than Toyota hybrids, just not a smooth drive that I normally get. 

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Those hybrid-only figures (50 Octavia, 55-60 Prius, and 65-70 Xceed) are actually encouraging.

If Toyota could get a PHEV into a Corolla I'd be tempted... They've done it on the C-HR...

PS a bit early yet then to see if new injectors will be needed every 30k. Let's hope not!

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7 hours ago, ThomasL said:

Those hybrid-only figures (50 Octavia, 55-60 Prius, and 65-70 Xceed) are actually encouraging.

If Toyota could get a PHEV into a Corolla I'd be tempted... They've done it on the C-HR...

PS a bit early yet then to see if new injectors will be needed every 30k. Let's hope not!

Of the other 3 2.0 ts corolla I know of all have been fine so far and most have done over 30,000 on new injectors, I think we are all still holding our breath though. 

Prius comes as a phev so no reason for not doing one in corolla, it's funny compairing different systems.. This is odd when you coast.. There is vertually no drag on system compaired to Toyota (yes I know Toyota is regening but kia is supposed to be too) then you put your foot down and are rewarded by a thud as drivetrain  takes up the slack. 

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Once I had an Uber ride to the airport in ioniq hybrid and the display showed 68mpg which is really good and I had a chat with the guy who owns the car since new and he said that it is economical indeed and he had a Prius previously. I asked him which one is the better car and more efficient, he replied-  the Prius is the winner, unfortunately too expensive for him to buy. 
My old Auris hybrid currently deliver 55mpg and this will go up to 60mpg in the summer, mixture of motorways and urban drives. Another interview thing is that after the new hybrid Battery replacement I only gained extra 3mpg , which means that ageing it’s not an issue in these power trains, at least not before the warning lights come up. Toyota make best hybrids imo. 

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I think a lot of the info being banded about is very misleading. I did a 40 mile trip last week, on the outward journey I averaged 58mpg. After an hours stop the returning 40 mile I did 85mpg. The journey wasn’t any different each way, not down hills on the way back or anything like that. I’ve noticed this before, when the car has got warm, the mpg is much lower.

 I could always claim the car does 85mpg but in reality I average just under 60 in the winter & 65+ in the summer.

Two years ago we had a weeks holiday in Snowdon, Wales, so a long run from Lincolnshire and then mountains and all. When we got home I’d averaged 69.8mpg. Again I could always say the car does 70mpg but it obviously doesn’t.

Maurice

 

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My 2022 2.0 TS has - according to dashboard display - averaged over 55mpg - I have not reset the display since buying the car new 18000 miles ago.  Consumption increases in cold weather, improves (and so will get better) in warm weather.

Of course I really dont know if the display is accurate - but another measure to observe how many miles I can do for £10 of fuel.   My Corolla is by far most economical car I have had - and can now - sometimes - achieve 100 miles /£10 even at todays petrol prices.  I think I last got there 20 or more years ago.   

But its not all about fuel consumption - the car drives well, handles tidily, and can meander along at high speeds when required.  I do enjoy the "point and squirt" performance. 

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1 hour ago, Dylanfan said:

I think a lot of the info being banded about is very misleading. I did a 40 mile trip last week, on the outward journey I averaged 58mpg. After an hours stop the returning 40 mile I did 85mpg. The journey wasn’t any different each way, not down hills on the way back or anything like that. I’ve noticed this before, when the car has got warm, the mpg is much lower.

 I could always claim the car does 85mpg but in reality I average just under 60 in the winter & 65+ in the summer.

Two years ago we had a weeks holiday in Snowdon, Wales, so a long run from Lincolnshire and then mountains and all. When we got home I’d averaged 69.8mpg. Again I could always say the car does 70mpg but it obviously doesn’t.

Maurice

 

My mileage is normally town driving with the odd motorway bit, I'm only compairing my normal driving habits against each car and this hasn't just been over 1 tank of fuel. 

The pic is over the last 6 days and I've only charged Battery on 4 of them ( 29 miles max on ev) so the figures are good whichever way you look at them. 

Would I buy one... No... But the competition is getting interesting. 

We have a lot of new car coming onto our fleet from other manufacturers and most seem to claim good mpg numbers, most also appear to have big reliability issues.... So if they all can sort out there issues there will be more choice to go for but as it stands at moment Toyota are way ahead as a total package. 😍😍😍

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my 23 TS 1.8 is currently showing 6.7L/100km   42MPG, mostly short drives.

 

 

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