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kimbo23

High Fuel Consumption?

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Hi all,

I have recently bought a 2003 Toyota Avensis T3-X (2.0 litre). I full tanked the car and I basically do 90% motorway driving. However I think the car has an increaed fuel consumption. I am getting around 300 miles for a full tank of petrol (brim to brim). This is unusually low for me as I used to own a 2.0 petrol VW Passat and I easily got over 400 miles from that.

Any advice guys? Im quite worried.

Thanks

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I've got the same engine and spec on a '55 plate. I'm getting between 400 and 450 miles a tank. Mine is mostly motorway cruising with rush hour traffic intermingled and accasionaly a bit of "spirited" driving. Sounds like somethings wrong with yours (unless you've a very heavy right foot?).

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I dont really put my foot down and I always try to use cruise control (around 70-75mph-ish)

Im abit concerned as to what I should do. Have you any ideas?

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Something else i forgot to mention is when I full tank the car, the range computer itself tells me the range is around 320-30ish miles. Initially i assumed the computer was wrong but it seems its right.

The car had been standing still for a month or so when I bought it so do you think this may be the cause? Maybe the engine needs to open up?? I am not mechanically inclined so im just clutching at straws here.

Another possibility I thought of was changing the fuel/oil/air filters??

Please help me guys, im starting to think I bought a lemon!

Thanks

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At 70-75 mph mine is below the power band and is pretty economical. The VVTi bit kicks in above 3.5K revs. I know cruise control uses up more fuel than using your feet, but whats the point in having a gadget and not using it? Bit like leaving the a/c in automatic mode.

When freshly serviced I was getting nearer 500 miles from a full brimming tank, but it has dropped off recently as it's due for a major service. Recently the computer has been telling me around 415 miles between tanks but it always add a few along the way.

Sorry I can't help, mine always goes back to Toyota main dealer as I don't have the knowledge to work on modern engines. A full service couldn't do any harm.

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Hi all,

I have recently bought a 2003 Toyota Avensis T3-X (2.0 litre). I full tanked the car and I basically do 90% motorway driving. However I think the car has an increaed fuel consumption. I am getting around 300 miles for a full tank of petrol (brim to brim). This is unusually low for me as I used to own a 2.0 petrol VW Passat and I easily got over 400 miles from that.

Any advice guys? Im quite worried.

Thanks

Never mind how many miles per tank, what's your actual mpg? The tank gauge cannot be trusted, it is *very* pessimistic. Mine says empty when there is still 8-10 litres left in the tank.

Do a brim to brim, record the miles and work out the mpg (don't trust the computer!) then let us know what you have...

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I am not concerned about the computer. I basically full tanked my car and noted the mileage. I then drove until it was right on the bottom of the reserve tank (until i thought i was going to breakdown) and then noted the mileage again. I got 300 miles (304 to be exact) from the full tank. Surely thats not the way its supposed to be right?

I think I may just service it on the weekend and hope for the best. Also i thought cruise control improved your fuel consumption???

Thanks

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You didn't mention how many liters/gallons did get in, brim to brim, but as a comparison my Avensis does ~ 650 Kms or 400 miles (403 to be exact ;) ) on the same amount of fuel.

So, you are right, your consumption is bad.

A full service would probably do no harm, and a diagnostic run on the Toyota intelligent tester may reveil the cause of the high consumption.

As all things are relative, a Cruise Control could improve fuel consumption, depending on your driver style.

Depending on the type of cruise control, its behaviour can be adapted. (Mine can).

Meaning, its "aggression level" can be adjusted and the speed band setting changed.

For instance, when the aggression level is set to "High", the cruise control will react very nervously and repeatedly gives full throttle when the speed drops by only 1 mile/hour, because of wind, influence of other traffic, or a slight incline.

The one thing a cruise control cannot do is anticipate.

I can run my Avensis more economical than the cruise control.

I only use it on flat terrain, which we have plenty over here, and on longer distances and not too dense traffic.

Then it's a comfortable feature and the investment pays off.

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I am not concerned about the computer. I basically full tanked my car and noted the mileage. I then drove until it was right on the bottom of the reserve tank (until i thought i was going to breakdown) and then noted the mileage again. I got 300 miles (304 to be exact) from the full tank. Surely thats not the way its supposed to be right?

I don't think I explained myself properly. When the fuel gauge says empty, it is completely wrong. In mine, I've driven over 100 miles with the tank showing "empty" and a range of "zero" miles before I chickened out and filled up.

That's why you need to do the brim to brim and measure the number of litres you put in as well as the number of miles.

That's the only way to know what your fuel economy actually is.

Best wishes..

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I am not concerned about the computer. I basically full tanked my car and noted the mileage. I then drove until it was right on the bottom of the reserve tank (until i thought i was going to breakdown) and then noted the mileage again. I got 300 miles (304 to be exact) from the full tank. Surely thats not the way its supposed to be right?

I don't think I explained myself properly. When the fuel gauge says empty, it is completely wrong. In mine, I've driven over 100 miles with the tank showing "empty" and a range of "zero" miles before I chickened out and filled up.

That's why you need to do the brim to brim and measure the number of litres you put in as well as the number of miles.

That's the only way to know what your fuel economy actually is.

Best wishes..

wow I dont think I can stomach driving my car 100 miles after the empty light lol. I think I will take it for a full service perhaps and see if that effects it in any way.

Something else I noticed on my way home from work today was when the engine is idling, the rev counter was at around 1500rpm.

But after 10 mins or so of driving it dropped to 1000rpm. Maybe this is linked in some way? Or maybe im just a rambling fool and the car was cold.

I think the only way to set my mind at peace would be to take it to Toyota and let them have a look. Hopefully!

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That's normal. Mine runs at about 1800rpm when stone cold, and then slowly reduces to about 700rpm as the car warms up.

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I get about 400mpg on a run with 90% motorway and 250mpg around town...

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I get about 400mpg on a run with 90% motorway and 250mpg around town...

How often do you fill it up then?

Once a year? :yahoo:

Sorry, couldn't resist.

@theoilburner:

The Avensis' fuel tank is supposed to contain 60 liters of fuel (= ~ 13.2 UK gallon).

The range computer and fuel gauge are somehow linked.

When the gauge goes to "reserve" and the orange warning light comes up, the computer shows zero.

That's the programming for the American market. ;)

However, in practice the moment the warning light comes on you'll only get 48 - 50 liters in at best.

That means there are still 10-12 liters left, and with my average km/mileage I can do another 160 Kms/ 100 miles easily.

I tested that last summer with a 10 liter spare can in the boot.

When I arrived at my planned petrol station in Luxemburg, 58.5 liters went in (without using the spare.. :) ) and the engine was still running.

Really.

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I think you're right, crazy isn't it? I've never known another car do this, of the (far too many) other cars I've owned, empty and zero miles range usually means pretty much that, within 10-15 miles.

I kinda think that instead of ensuring you don't run out, because I now just ignore my fuel gauge I'm probably more likely to conk out on fumes... :)

I suppose I could go by 13 gallons (that's about 60 litres, isn't it?) x average mpg showing = actual range (maybe knock 10% off for safety), using the trip counter to keep track of the miles each fill up, which will be fine as long as I don't get my maths wrong! :)

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...crazy isn't it? ...

Yeh, but the US is a big market for Toyota, and I think this bit of ECU programming crept in from there.

Remember Toyota easily runs the risk to get sued for $10 million dollars, if someone runs out and the computer says "Range left: 5 miles".

For emotional damage. :wacko:

Fortunately we don't have that in Europe, but for that we have a big reserve. :lol:

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...crazy isn't it? ...

Yeh, but the US is a big market for Toyota, and I think this bit of ECU programming crept in from there.

Remember Toyota easily runs the risk to get sued for $10 million dollars, if someone runs out and the computer says "Range left: 5 miles".

For emotional damage. :wacko:

Fortunately we don't have that in Europe, but for that we have a big reserve. :lol:

Hi to all, one point worth remembering is that the fuel pump inside the fuel tank is also cooled by the fuel in there, so having 10 -13 ltrs left in the tank when the low fuel light comes on is not a bad thing as it could prevent the pump overheating!:yes: Anyway I have had 600 miles from one tank of diesel .................................!!:yahoo::toast:

Regards Pete.

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I get about 400mpg on a run with 90% motorway and 250mpg around town...

How often do you fill it up then?

Once a year? :yahoo:

Sorry, couldn't resist.

@theoilburner:

The Avensis' fuel tank is supposed to contain 60 liters of fuel (= ~ 13.2 UK gallon).

The range computer and fuel gauge are somehow linked.

When the gauge goes to "reserve" and the orange warning light comes up, the computer shows zero.

That's the programming for the American market. ;)

However, in practice the moment the warning light comes on you'll only get 48 - 50 liters in at best.

That means there are still 10-12 liters left, and with my average km/mileage I can do another 160 Kms/ 100 miles easily.

I tested that last summer with a 10 liter spare can in the boot.

When I arrived at my planned petrol station in Luxemburg, 58.5 liters went in (without using the spare.. :) ) and the engine was still running.

Really.

This is true, the most I have been able to get in is 51 litres, after the warning light comes on.

I did read somewhere, probably on here, that the fuel-pump is in the tank and has to have some fuel covering it to keep it cool or something along those lines!

I average around 300 miles before the refuel light comes on (2.0 petrol Automatic T-Spirit) computer says around 30 mpg, which I assumed was good because I am an I.A.M qualified member and they teach a method of driving which ensures the most economical fuel use.

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I get about 400mpg on a run with 90% motorway and 250mpg around town...

How often do you fill it up then?

Once a year? :yahoo:

Sorry, couldn't resist.

@theoilburner:

The Avensis' fuel tank is supposed to contain 60 liters of fuel (= ~ 13.2 UK gallon).

The range computer and fuel gauge are somehow linked.

When the gauge goes to "reserve" and the orange warning light comes up, the computer shows zero.

That's the programming for the American market. ;)

However, in practice the moment the warning light comes on you'll only get 48 - 50 liters in at best.

That means there are still 10-12 liters left, and with my average km/mileage I can do another 160 Kms/ 100 miles easily.

I tested that last summer with a 10 liter spare can in the boot.

When I arrived at my planned petrol station in Luxemburg, 58.5 liters went in (without using the spare.. :) ) and the engine was still running.

Really.

This is true, the most I have been able to get in is 51 litres, after the warning light comes on.

I did read somewhere, probably on here, that the fuel-pump is in the tank and has to have some fuel covering it to keep it cool or something along those lines!

I average around 300 miles before the refuel light comes on (2.0 petrol Automatic T-Spirit) computer says around 30 mpg, which I assumed was good because I am an I.A.M qualified member and they teach a method of driving which ensures the most economical fuel use.

Sorry T-spirit Pete, didn't see your last post about the fuel pump, I had read about it in an earlier post, but it does confirm what I had read about the pump.

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guys! I have just been to the garage and the mechanic tells me that for this car, it is normal to get around 300miles per tank of fuel.

IS HE TALKING TOTAL BULLS**T?!?!

i am going out of my mind now. he says there is nothing that can be done and that it is normal for a big powerful car like this to give that sort of mileage.

i bought this car in the opinion that Toyota's are both economical and reliable. i travel alot for work etc and cannot afford a car that gives such crappy mileage.

can anyone suggest anything???

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can anyone suggest anything???

Not much in addition to the above, and that 300 miles on a tank for a petrol 2.0 engine is bad.

I recommend going to a Toyota dealer for a diagnostics run on their Intelligent tester.

It can even show the fuel flow per injector, the condition of sensors, spark plugs, etc. etc. to diagnose the high fuel consumption.

Don't go to the garage that told you it's normal.

Note, that the Itelligent Tester is something entirely different than a OBD2 Code Reader.

Again, yours does ~ 30 mpg, against mine (T27 1.8 Liter engine) does ~45 mpg.

I would call that difference.... "considerable". :o

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Just went to toyota dealer and spoke to one of the mechanics. He said the intelligent tester is pointless as I have no warning lights on the dash. He also said that around 300 miles per tank is average for this car.

AARRGGHH! i have also done a service and i suppose i will find out if thats made any changes over the next week or so.

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Can they confirm whether there are fault codes?

Perhaps resetting your ECU is worth a try.

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Reset ECU is worth persuing.

It will re-learn and will effect economy of the car.

Also try and approach your local independent garage and ask about a dose of Forte additives, this is known to help some cars to clear clogged systems and improve economy no end.

My 2 pennies.

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He said the intelligent tester is pointless....

Well, that says it all then. :(

Note, that the Itelligent Tester is something entirely different than a OBD2 Code Reader.

Even if a car has been running flawlessly during its entire life, and never produced an error code, these Toyota dealer electronics can produce a wealth of information.

Provided... that someone in there knows how to operate it. :!Removed!:

I recommend to download the .rar file mentioned here:

http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=111390

extract the pdf-manuals, and open the diagnostics guide.

For information only, but page through some chapters and see how and when for instance the handheld tester is used.

It's an amazing device... if you know what to do with it and how to interpret the data.

Again, the device is independent of any car-induced error codes.

It can even create them. ;)

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