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toyotanovice

Key Won't Fit In Ignition

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Hi Recently bought a 7 year old Avensis T3X - full Toyota service history , 78,000 mls and looks good. Had trouble since we bought it 6 weeks ago fitting key into ignition - tonight it wouldn't fit at all - only by a couple of cms or so. Anyone have this happen?

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Sounds like the lock has seized, do you have the original keys with it? or are they copies?

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Would hazard a guess that it will need a complete new barrell , hence new keys and probably alarm / central locking recoded . Not cheap . It it's just the barrell seizing then moderate lubrication MIGHT solve it . Lubricate it with silicone Oil with key in , it will help Oil run through system . Ignition off of course . And let it dry out for a few hours . It's the simplest solution , if this doesn't work then it's a problem for an auto electrician and can't imagine it will be cheap .

Sorry I couldn't be of any help .

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Um, in situations such as this an autoelectrician really is your best friend. Its amazing what they can repair for very little cost compared to the replacement option. Anyone on here know a good autoelectrician in the Greater London area? There must be a fair few knocking about.

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I've had this lately with the door and boot; Key goes in but won't turn. If I wait a few seconds it eventually will so maybe some grease or something in the lock plus the cold weather?

Ignition has been fine tho'...

How is the key? Is there any damage or warping? I drop mine a lot and am always worried I'll chip a bit off or dent it or something!

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Iv had the same thing happen this morning in the ignition. The key took some twisting and turning to go in. Once in it turned, no problem.

Will wd40 be any good to clean the barrell?

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Maybe like MISTER BEAN fit a hasp and padlock. lol.

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WD40 has a more penetrating effect and there may be an issue regarding this shorting across circuits . Silicon lubricant works better but needs to be worked in a little using key in almost fully to guide the silicon lubricant to follow its path to all areas . Again , as electrics are involved , the least is better :) hope this helps

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So sorry not to reply - I haven't been checking because thought you got e-mails to tell you there were replies.

Thanks very much for replying. This is what happened. Ignition barrel was worn out (says AA and auto locksmith). There had been repairs before , they thought, but gradually it had got worse over the weeks since we bought the car, so that we couldn't even insert the key into the lock.

An auto locksmith, recommendation from a good local garage, advised ordering a new barrel from Toyota which he would fit. Thought the cost would be scary because of central locking etc, but the new barrel cost £72 and the fitting only slightly more. It was a real surprise as we were expecting to have to change the door locks and car keys or alternatively have a separate key for the ignition and door locks.

It was unusual, locksmith said, for Toyota ig. barrels to go wrong at our mileage.

He advised against WD 40 because of electronics, but I didn't ask about silicon lubricant as I'd not then read the post.

Another London auto locksmith offered to repair the barrel for £140, but as the cost of a new one fitted turned out to be £160 ish, we went with getting a new one. (I can't guarantee, if you have the same problem, that it might not be more expensive.)

If the ignition key is sticking and getting worse, it might be a good idea to have it looked at. As I understand it, if you can insert the key in the ignition, then you can extract the barrel and replace with a new or repaired one. However, if you can't even insert the key then you have to take out bits of the steering wheel to insert the barrel - obviously more work.

The new barrel works perfectly, but, as a weird side issue - our lousy fuel consumption seems to have improved too. (The local garage doesn't understand it, but spouse and I agree that the engine is running more smoothly and efficiently after the barrel was fitted! Any theories as to why, anyone?)

If there's a way of contacting me, I can give you the contact of the good auto locksmith in East London who helped us. It's probably advertising to post it here. But he gave very good advice when, with car totally immobile, we didn't really know who to ask. Thanks again for your replies.

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Hello, members can contact you via a PM (personal message) I have sent you one.

It sounds to me like you got a real bargain with the Auto Locksmith guy and i'm sure others will be interested to have his number, just a single new key without a barrel is around £160.00 from Toyota!

Pete.

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I have used W40 for 30 yrs, and in the old days we used it for the very reason that it did not conduct electricity. We used it to displace water on electrical connection that had a poor reading across terminations.

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I am having the same issue so i am glad that ive read this and joined the forum. Will find an autoelectrician round here and get it sorted.

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