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Space saver wheel inform insurance company ?


Hybrid21
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Speaking to a neighbour re installing my Road Hero space saver wheel.

He said that I must inform the insurance company as the vehicle is now non standard.

Never thought of this, what do you guys think ?

 

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I have to say I’ve not informed my insurer and probably don’t consider this as a non standard modification. It could be thought of as luggage?

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Theoretically it is a change to standard spec, and when you take out new insurance or renew a policy, you agree the vehicle is standard spec unless you notify of changes.

Usually, if a claim occurs, the insurer would repair the car to the standard specification if no modifications had been declared.

Not sure an insurer would be too interested in the insured swapping a tyre repair kit for a space saver wheel/kit especially if it is correctly and safely fitted - ie as part of a kit supplied by the vehicle manufacturer.

However, it wouldn't do any harm to check.

 

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And if the Rescue Services fitted a space-saver in lieu of a punctured tyre????????????????????????

Can't see a space-saver in the boot being an issue for an insurer - if it does then best just to switch off the lights now..................

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And what about a full size spare that was not originally in the car when new.???
Think reason and common sense need be applied.Unfortunately that doesn't happen with a lot of things nowadays . Suspect we are in a minefield with this one.

 

Terry

 

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We had a discussion re if you were in an accident with the space saver on that the insurance company as always would look for a way of not paying out.

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So where do you draw the line to being “non standard”, do you need to notify the insurance company when fitting roof bars, roof box, child safety seat, tow bar, cycle rack, mud flaps, de-badged or black badges added.

 

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18 minutes ago, Rigsby said:

So where do you draw the line to being “non standard”,

May vary from company to company. Some insurers will be OK with having a dash cam powered by the 12v socket, but count a hard wired dash cam as a modification.

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25 minutes ago, Rigsby said:

So where do you draw the line to being “non standard”, do you need to notify the insurance company when fitting roof bars, roof box, child safety seat, tow bar, cycle rack, mud flaps, de-badged or black badges added.

 

Or even car mats.

There is a common law idea, which asks the question of what a reasonable person would do. I certainly hope insurance companies apply this approach.

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The general rule of thumb I use is, if it didn't come with the car and was damaged in an accident, would I want them to repair/replace it - If then answer is yes I declare it, if not I don't.

Then there are things which change the spec of the car or are explicitly listed by the insurer, e.g. paint/stickers/decals, suspension changes, rim size changes, body mods, engine mods, forced induction etc.

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9 hours ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

May vary from company to company. Some insurers will be OK with having a dash cam powered by the 12v socket, but count a hard wired dash cam as a modification.

For which they should offer a discount.

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We are in muddy water now. The original purchase may include options, car mats, mid flaps, roof bars, tow hitch, dash cam, etc., fitted either by the manufacturer or the dealer. These are not part of the original offer but optional extras added at the time of purchase. Are these to be considered as modifications?

Rightly or wrongly, I’ve always considered modifications as remaps to the ECU, wider tyres, lowered suspension things that will affect the declared original specifications. I would have thought that this would have been the reasonable view of the bloke down the pub or the man in the street. Sorry for bloke or man read person.

I also think that one of the issues with regard to this topic is that every insurance provider seems to have a different view on the subject and the definition of what might have been done to materially effect any potential claim.

 

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I got my Toyota OEM spare tire kit and dash cam fitted by the dealer before the vehicle was delivered to me so i wouldn't consider this as a modification.

Same goes for different levels of trim, should we inform the insurers we got heated leather seats or sun roof etc?

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2 hours ago, Shootgun said:

Same goes for different levels of trim, should we inform the insurers we got heated leather seats or sun roof etc?

The obvious answer is 'no'.

You will have insured your vehicle according to whatever trim level it is. If these features are included within the specific trim level of your car - eg Excel, Design, etc - it will be the standard spec

However, if you've specified options or had additional features fitted (eg third party parts or accessories), these won't be part of the standard spec for your car, and will need to be declared if you want them covered.

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One of my colleagues had an accident in his Mercedes, writing it off. His insurers refused to pay out on the basis that he'd painted his wheels black without telling them....

It took nearly a year and the insurance Ombudsmen becoming involved before they begrudgingly paid up.

My motorcycle insurers have a much more sensible approach, they're not interested in minor changes / additions as long as they don't affect the performance.

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Just because your neighbor said something does not mean it is true - especially if the car has a space to put the spare wheel. Even if that's not the case, as someone already said, treat this as luggage.

If you ring your insurer, they will most likely take this opportunity to increase premium. 

Hence, do nothing. Enjoy your spare wheel. 

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