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Crimping pliers and a assortment of connectors


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Hello, first strip back wire then twist ends, push wires into terminal slot then crimp repeat up shank 2 or 3 times.

3 diffrent slots for diffrent size connectors. If you have a lot of free space within fitting remove wire and fold it reinsert and crimp

Use on stranded wires. This is a DIY tool.IMG_0316.thumb.JPEG.1c3af9f9264e4c0ec37f2c87d94f51df.JPEGIMG_0317.thumb.JPEG.dab823721e1a118ebac7d7af74b5e0f3.JPEG

IMG_0315.JPEG

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11 hours ago, Derek.w said:

Hello, first strip back wire then twist ends, push wires into terminal slot then crimp repeat up shank 2 or 3 times.

3 diffrent slots for diffrent size connectors. If you have a lot of free space within fitting remove wire and fold it reinsert and crimp

Use on stranded wires. This is a DIY tool.IMG_0316.thumb.JPEG.1c3af9f9264e4c0ec37f2c87d94f51df.JPEGIMG_0317.thumb.JPEG.dab823721e1a118ebac7d7af74b5e0f3.JPEG

IMG_0315.JPEG

 

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I have that one, top left.  bought it in a French service area over 40 years ago.  I also bought a set of jump leads, really heavy duty and once complimented on their quality.  I guess they might have been use able on a truck too. 

My wife wonders why I like browsing on the French service areas, but they often have good quality stuff rather than the holiday tat in ours. 

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Not a fan of using crimps but if I have to then ratchet crimp pliers are a must.

As for jump leads, here's some I made at work many years ago, cables are clamped & soldered. There retired at home now as we have a jump box in the workshop which is more convenient. 

 

Jump leads.jpg

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Ratchet crimping tools are the way to go if you going to use it an a regular bases.

Heat shrinking tubeing after soldering yes I go that way if its under the car or under the bonnet.

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Ratchet crimps are more for the professional rather than the DIY user if you crimp it in various locations along its shank as I have with no problems over many years but still just used on the odd occasion,.

Ratchet type one or two presses and its completed both wire & insulation so its faster if you doing a lot of crimping.

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Over the years I had some issues with DIY crimping tools, where hte crimp has come undone. I have bought some ratchet type crimp tools but my favourites ate the red handle crimping pliers for insulated terminals and the dark blue handled non ratchet crimp tool for insulated terminals.

Img_5119.jpg

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soldering & heatshrinking it depends on what you are doing possibly if you joining into your existing loom I use that method if I am adding wiring from the Battery post I crimp.

Original Manufactures connections at Battery are crimp connections in any case!,

See photo   IMG_0320.thumb.JPEG.f0d61d2cbd30723a9291c2ade97c26af.JPEG

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3 hours ago, Derek.w said:

Original Manufactures connections at battery are crimp connections in any case!,

I think all connections throughout the car at manufacture are crimped.

But they are done with controlled crimpers - either ratchet or a machine operation. They won't risk anything that isn't standardized and predictable.

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5 hours ago, MikeSh said:

I think all connections throughout the car at manufacture are crimped.

But they are done with controlled crimpers - either ratchet or a machine operation. They won't risk anything that isn't standardized and predictable.

Those type of crimps are in a different league for quality compared to red and blue insulated crimps. I use crimps at work regularly for certain non automotive jobs but only where not exposed to movement and heatshrink over these when mains is involved. If I wanted to do the best possible job as opposed to speedy, I'd solder in every case though 

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I did buy a cheap ratcheting set but be warned,if it's too cheap it may not work right! I think a decent pair is towards 30 quid (I might be out of date here) The pressed steel ones as above don't work well and also will break with heavy use 

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I always thought soldering was superior as you'd get a better connection and a physical bond, but apparently this isn't the case in the automotive world - I'm told a crimped connector is much stronger than a soldered one and is less likely to fail due to vibrations and being knocked about, and is also easier and faster to do.

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You won’t find any soldering in OEM harnesses. It adds weight, time consuming, requires heat, solder gives off odour etc etc.

All connections are crimped, then heat sealed if prone to water.

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Well lads I can do a good job with non crimp pliers but then I am not on a production line and can afford the time to check out how secure it is and if need be reclamp it again until I am happy its attached securely.

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I'm a firm believer in doing things once properly.

It isn't worth the time of a poor crimp eventually working loose and having to do it again anyway. Even at minimum wage, if you save yourself an hour over the tool's lifetime, you've paid for the tool.

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I agree totally. There's a time to crimp and a time to solder. When I solder, or crimp, I tend to use heatshrink to keep everything neat.

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