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Fidgits
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According to Wikipedia:-

In the broadest sense of the term, the internal combustion engine can be said to have been invented in China, with the invention of fireworks during the Song dynasty.....

and

The Italians Eugenio Barsanti and Felice Matteucci patented a first working efficient version of an internal combustion engine in 1854

Wikipedia

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I`m going with T600 on this.

Any combustion that takes place in a confined space can be considered to be internal. And therefore we must thank the Chinese for their stirling efforts.  :thumbsup:

But, I didnt ask who invented internal combustion....

I asked who invented the internal combustion engine...

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Hang on, something (& not the internet or anything like that) is telling me some1 like Leonardo Da Vinci, got a feeling it was him for some reason.

*Awaits endless mickey taking when some1 says how hopelessly wrong I am*

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yes a jet engine is a JET engine... re-read, i asked who invented the internal combustion engine specifically!

Also from Wikipedia

"Jet engines, most rockets and many gas turbines are classed as internal combustion engines, but the term "internal combustion engine" is often loosely used to refer specifically to a piston internal combustion engine and rotary combustion engine in which combustion is intermittent and the products act on reciprocating machinery, the most common subtype of this kind of engine."

:D

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Ah, thats arguing over semantics - but valid...

but anyway, the piston engine was invented before the jet engine, so the question is still valid.

A rocket actual performs combusition at the thrust point, so being pedantic, it isnt actual 'internal'!

And Kev, Herr Benz built the first motorcar, not the engine...

Da Vinci built various machines, mainly flying (both glider and helecopter) which never actually flew, but all his designs were based on mechanics driven by a human...

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You're right it is semantics. Sorry. Posted it merely to show why Wikipedia would consider the Rockets to be ICEs.

Regarding conventional piston engines - I recall the 'Carnot' cycle from year 1 thermodynamics (that's about all I can remember). I'm not sure whether he actually built a working model or whether it was just a theory. Semantics again.

If that counts then Carnot, if not then what JJ said.

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Ah, thats arguing over semantics - but valid...

but anyway, the piston engine was invented before the jet engine, so the question is still valid.

A rocket actual performs combusition at the thrust point, so being pedantic, it isnt actual 'internal'!

And Kev, Herr Benz built the first motorcar, not the engine...

Da Vinci built various machines, mainly flying (both glider and helecopter) which never actually flew, but all his designs were based on mechanics driven by a human...

Ah well, I wasn't as hopelessly wrong as I was dreading, that's a result in my book

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I think it depends upon your idea of invention and experimentation. Based on some info I found on the subject, here's my take on it:

Christian Huygens, a Dutch Physicist was the first recorded person to experiment with an internal combustion engine in 1680. J.J. Etienne Lenoir built the first effective gasoline powered engine in 1859 (a spark ignition engine) but this would have been based upon the theories and technical application discovered by Christian Huygens.

Alphonse Beau de Rochas, a French Scientist patented a four stroke engine in 1862 but did not build it.

Nikolaus A. Otto actually built a four stroke engine, for which the term "Otto Cycle" was derived, 16 years later - but surely this would have been constructed using Alphonse Beau de Rochas' plans that were already patented?

Sir Dougald Clark built the first sucessful two stroke engine in the same year. The principles of which are still in use today.

So Nikolaus A. Otto built an internal combustion engine which could be considered a prototype of the ones used in modern day, but this would have been based upon Christain Huygens' and J.J. Etienne Lenoir's original technical research and experimentation dating back to 1680.

I would choose Lenoir, because even though his prototype would have incorportated Huygens' research, it was the first effective gas powered, internal combustion engine.

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