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abdulwq

Carina E Timing Belt,water Pum And Radiator

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Hi

I bought carina e 1992 . the car has 270,000 km on it.

timing belt has done 100,000km so time to change,so as the water.The radiator is quite rusty laso so i think it needed to be changed also.

Shall i buy OEM timing belt,water pump and radiator or is it better go for after market parts?

What good brand for radiator?

Do i need to drain the whole coolant when changing radiator?

I have changed timing belt on corolla once so is it difficult to change the water pump?

Do i also need to change the timing belt tensioner?

Pls ans .

Thanks

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I understand the leanburn 7A-FE is non interference, so the worst thing about the cam belt braking is being stranded somewhere. If this is not a problem, I wouldn't bother changing the belt. You could try removing the top cover to see if you can see any cracks in the rubber. 170,000km is quite a distance for a belt, can you be sure it hasn't been changed since 100,000km? An aftermarket belt is fine as a replacement, possibly better.

If the tensioner bearing runs smoothly I wouldn't bother replacing it.

If the waterpump doesn't leak I wouldn't bother replacing it.

Does the car overheat, particularly when left idling on a hot day? If not, don't bother replacing the radiator. If it does, to put off replacing it, try turning the engine off when not actually moving and run the heater & fan on max.

If you do change the radiator, drain the coolant from the drain at the bottom of the radiator first, otherwise when you disconnect the radiator hoses, the water will go everywhere.

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I understand the leanburn 7A-FE is non interference, so the worst thing about the cam belt braking is being stranded somewhere. If this is not a problem, I wouldn't bother changing the belt. You could try removing the top cover to see if you can see any cracks in the rubber. 170,000km is quite a distance for a belt, can you be sure it hasn't been changed since 100,000km? An aftermarket belt is fine as a replacement, possibly better.

If the tensioner bearing runs smoothly I wouldn't bother replacing it.

If the waterpump doesn't leak I wouldn't bother replacing it.

Does the car overheat, particularly when left idling on a hot day? If not, don't bother replacing the radiator. If it does, to put off replacing it, try turning the engine off when not actually moving and run the heater & fan on max.

If you do change the radiator, drain the coolant from the drain at the bottom of the radiator first, otherwise when you disconnect the radiator hoses, the water will go everywhere.

Thanks mate...gonna have o look at the timing belt first.

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I have done all these jobs on my Carina E 1.8 7AFE car because the water pump was leaking, then the radiator started leaking and finally a 'pinking' sound started coming from the area of the cambelt covers.

The pinking sound was the tensioner bearing that had worn well beyond the limits.

All the jobs are straight forward and easy to get at. To be honest I should have done the water pump and cambelt at the same time as they both need about the same amount of access.

I advise you get the rocker cover off first and then start removing the cambelt covers from the top down.

When you get to remove the large pulley bolt from the bottom pulley, use 2 metal plates about a foot long. Drill holes at each end, about 10mm will be about right. Bolt the plates together at one end. Then use something like drill bits to locate the other ends of the plates into the 2 holes in the crankshaft pulley. This then forms a triangle. As you start to undo the crankshaft bolt the crankshaft will rotate complete with the plates until the bolted ends contact the ground. This will then lock the shaft so you can undo the bolt using a powerbar.

It is seriously tight.

The waterpump pulley has tight access but the 4 bolts can be undone with a slim combi spanner. It's a bit fiddly but not too difficult.

You will also need to support the engine when you remove the engine mount to get the old cambelt off and the new one on.

Don't forget to mark the position of the pulleys before you take the old belt off in case they rotate. I used tippex.

I hope you find this useful.

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To hold the crankshaft for loosening & tightening the crankshaft pulley bolt, I put the car in 4th or 5th gear & had my wife press the brake pedal firmly.

To hold the engine while the mount is removed, either jack from below the sump and/or place a length of wood across the engine bay and support with a length of chain wrapped around it & bolted to the engine. Toyotas usually come with hooks bolted to the engine for lifting purposes that can be relocated to a more convenient bolt if necessary.

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Yep thats the way i loosen the crank bolt only i put it in first gear. There should be an insection cover on the flywheel where you can get a long sturdy screwdriver in to jam the flywheel. I also use an electric impact gun which plugs into the cigarette lighter or clips on the Battery i think i only paid less than £20 for it from machine mart and the impact sockets were about £12.

The four bolts for the water pump pulley i use a 10mm swan neck ring spanner.

There should be timing marks on the camshaft and crankshaft to time it correctly.

I prefer to use a trolley jack underneath with a block of wood accross when i undo the engine mount so i can raise and lower the engine as required. It's a really easy job to do on 1.6 or 1.8 engines it's a lot more trickey with a 2.0 not as much room to work.

Happy days tho' :thumbsup:

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