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Auris Clutch replacement diy


roks
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Hi all,

I think its time to replace the clutch on my 2013 auris excel. High bitting point, quite firm pedal, occasionally judders in reverse and I am feeling it on the knee.....or I am getting old.

Mr.clutch quoted £500, my local garage quoted £980 as theri computer showed 7.5hrs labour, apparently subframe and ac line is in the way etc. Will see what Mr.T says, but I cant see it quoting less than 500.

So the question is, how difficult is it to replace an auris mk2 clutch?

I did 2004 corolla myself in 2016, wasnt too bad for a 1st major, but this one looks more cramped space under the hood, and am 8 years older 😉.

I've been looking around for diy video or guides but not found any. I have access to the toyota service manual but thats long winded, need some mimised version. 

Any ideas/ suggestions?

Thanks

 

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Thanks for the link, this one similar to my 2004 corolla, Auris mk2 looks a bit more fidly.

 

 

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I've been looking at clutch kit prices, they are not cheap, 250-300 for 3pcs kit. ECP doesn't seem to be cheap anymore, no discount codes like they used to.

Cheapest I've found was Borg & Beck £145 for a 3pcs kit, are these any good? Next is BluePrint, £80 for 2pcs kit and the £105 for LuK concentric slave cylinder and Aisin 3pcs kits £258.

I'll also need 2.4litre of gear oil (x3 bottles) approx. £55.

So I am looking at a minimum cost of £350 for parts and accessories, is it worth the effort for a DIY? 

Does anyone have experience of Mr. Clutch? They quoted £500 but not sure if that includes slave cylinder and new gear oil.

 

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Mr.T says minimum £800+ they will confirm "what else one they open the gearbox".

However the parts department gave me quote for a 3pcs clutch kit £310.

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Don't just buy parts like that based on price, go for quality aftermarket like Luk even if it's double the price of the cheapest. DIY depends on what facilities you've got, I wouldn't fancy doing it in the rain by the roadside 🤣 . I've single handed done clutches on other cars that need subframe dropping so it's perfectly doable. you'll probably need an engine support and a suitable jack to hold the gearbox as you lower it 

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Remember not only the clutch kit, but also the fork and rubber boot are also recommended to replace. I put an AISIN kit on mine more than 4 years ago. Doing fine so far.

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If you absolutely cannot afford to pay someone to do it, or you relish the challenge, then by all means, do it yourself. It is not just the time you need to spend doing the actual work, it is also all the research like this, that will take a fair amount of time. And if you are concerned about your age, that is certainly another factor to weigh in. So, it depends on how much you value your time and health, and how long can you live with the car being out of action. 

They should not need to open the gearbox. You "just" drain the oil and undo it from the engine.  Like others say, don't go for the cheapest parts, it's a false economy and means you potentially have to spend even more time and money fixing and replacing things soon again. But do make sure to replace bearings and release cylinder while you are at it.

I wonder if this video of the 1.8 could be very similar to yours: Toyota Auris 1.8 manual clutch

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1 hour ago, jcps001 said:

also the fork and rubber boot

This car doesn't have a fork, but has a concentric slave cylinder inside the bellhousing, I will be replacing that.

39 minutes ago, APS said:

They should not need to open the gearbox

I think he meant removing it from the engine.

Thanks guys, I am waiting for a quote from this YouTube williams mobile mechanic, if that's outrageous price then I'll be doing it myself, might buy the clutch kit from Mr.T

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The concentric cylinder in these is very expensive, so makes a clutch 3-1 kit expensive. Ensure it does come with a kit if buying parts yourself, they often don't supply one in a kit due to how expensive they are. If you PM me the reg number I can quote you an exact price so you know what to compare it to 

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The CSC for my old Mk2 1.33 Yaris cost near as much as the rest of the clutch kit combined from what I remember! :eek: 

IIRC I managed to source a third party one from Fensport for significantly less in the end.

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22 minutes ago, roks said:

This car doesn't have a fork, but has a concentric slave cylinder inside the bellhousing, I will be replacing that.

Sorry for trying to mislead you. Thought you had a 1.4 D4D 2007

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Clutch replacement it’s a big job and often can bring complications afterwards as a result of poor quality parts or improper workmanship. 
In situations like that best practice imo is to book the car with local mechanic, talk about the parts and your preferences, what brands, where to buy from etc and strike a deal with the mechanic and let him source the parts himself so you pay one invoice parts+labour so you get warranty.
This is very important. 
Now if you about diy project, then do your research about parts and eventually a specialist tools you may need, watch some videos from exact model or very similar set up to familiarise yourself with the procedure.
Buy best quality parts available and change all 3 components to eliminate potential re work in near future. I personally will not do this job myself on my drive as I am not physically able to do it and have no one to help. 
I had used Mr. Clutch many years ago and I can tell that the quality of these garages is similar to kwick fit, f1 auto centres, and all other national chains, imo not great. 

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Another tool you will need is some sort of clutch centring tool, needn't be fancy, just a mandrel to chuck through the clutch plate centre before tightening, so it lines up with bearing 

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13 minutes ago, Saxmaniac said:

clutch centring tool

Thanks, I've got that on my list, this will be a eBay job, under 10er

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It is a very involved job if you've never done it before; Can take 2 days, esp. if you're just doing it with axle stands.

Wouldn't even attempt to do it myself; I think the official Toyota method still involves removing the engine, which is why it's so expensive as all the coolant and oil has to be drained and then refilled too, but you can do it without by loosening the engine mounts and putting a jack under the engine then splitting them, but it's very tight to undo everything in such a small space, and the CSC adds complication as the hydraulics run into the gearbox instead of being on the outside like on normal fork-based ones.

If you go ahead, I'd definitely recommend dragging in an enthusiast friend, preferably one who's done it before, as having a helping hand for some parts really helps, as well as having someone else there to spot that e.g. a hose hasn't been reconnected or something so you don't end up dismantling everything again just for one poxy hose!

 

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53 minutes ago, Cyker said:

It is a very involved job if you've never done it before

I have some experience, did my corolla 2004.

The Williams mechanic has quoted me £231 for LUK 3 piece kit, £500 fitting.

I am leaning on a DIY, will get the boys to help lifting the box back in. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

This Auris looks rustier after 10yrs (assuming its the original) than the 16yrs old corolla drive shaft. 

How problematic will this be on the day when the time? I'm going round soaking the rusty looking bolts with wd-penerant and plusgas.

20240420_181602.jpg

20240420_181605.jpg

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Ahh that reminds me of my 1st Mk1 Yaris... the centre cap had fallen off the wheel at some point (I inquired about some proper replacements from PartsKing but they were inexplicably expensive! :eek: ), so the castle nut or whatever it's called was exposed to the elements and had gotten so corroded it had practically turned back into iron ore! :eek: :laugh: 

At least yours hasn't gone that reddy black colour yet so it probably isn't too bad :laugh: 

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17 hours ago, roks said:

This Auris looks rustier after 10yrs (assuming its the original) than the 16yrs old corolla drive shaft. 

How problematic will this be on the day when the time? I'm going round soaking the rusty looking bolts with wd-penerant and plusgas.

20240420_181602.jpg

20240420_181605.jpg

These will be a garage equipment job imo.
I never had that badly corroded nuts and it was so difficult to undo my first bearings change and then 3 years later I couldn’t do it and let a mechanic I know to change them for me because of these.
You will need a large breaker bar 70+cm with extension eventually, place a car jack under for additional support and you can use some heat gun to heat them up before try it plus a lots of wd 40 rust specialist spray.   

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17 hours ago, Cyker said:

 (I inquired about some proper replacements from PartsKing but they were inexplicably expensive! :eek: ),

Soz about that 😂😂😂

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11 minutes ago, TonyHSD said:

You will need a large breaker bar 70+cm with extension eventually, place a car jack under for additional support and you can use some heat gun to heat them up before try it plus a lots of wd 40 rust specialist spray.   

Thanks Tony, I am thinking of all those things, I have extra 1/2" breaker, a pipe, heat gun, wd specialist and some left over plusgas. I'll be soaking the trouble makers over several times, hopefully it won't be too much trouble.

I also have a small 1/2" cordless impact wrench but I am not expecting that to break axle nut loose but for other bolts its ok.

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18 minutes ago, roks said:

I also have a small 1/2" cordless impact wrench but I am not expecting that to break axle nut loose but for other bolts its ok.

It may well do it if it's of decent calibre. The impact wrench makes it much easier when you're working on you own. Don't worry about the rust. You'll get the nut off one way or another. It's relatively straightforward as it's all chunky and strong mechanical bits (compared to working with rusty panel bolts, brake pipe unions etc. that shear off as soon as you look at them). If you are unlucky the drive shaft splines have seized in the hub, that is more challenging. Then you need a hand sledge hammer or a strong puller, or in worst case, a hydraulic press. But there's no point worrying about it, you deal with each thing as they come.

Always allow for things to take longer than you think. Cars have a tendency to throw the most unexpected curveballs.

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I think the axle nuts are punched into the groove so you need to destroy the nut anyway, I presume very careful grinding needed?

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4 hours ago, Saxmaniac said:

I think the axle nuts are punched into the groove so you need to destroy the nut anyway, I presume very careful grinding needed?

Good point. They are staked into a groove of the driveshaft end. You can use a screwdriver to push it out. You are meant to replace the locking cap. Order one so you have a new to replace with. 

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7 hours ago, Saxmaniac said:

I think the axle nuts are punched into the groove

I'll unstake it, not expecting the nuts to survive so will get new ones.

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