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Camry Stalling

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Okay after some searching I found this site and here is my situation...

I have a '99 Camery with a 2.2 4cyl. 88,000 miles. Stalling at lights or slow downs and seems more predominant in wetter weather or when quite humid.

What I have done thus far...

Replaced the O2 sensor according to my mechanic. $350.00

Did not fix

Decided to do some of my own work and experimenting.

Cleaned Battery terms

Did not work (did not think it would but it was a quick very easy thing)

Took throttle body off car and cleaned it.

Did not work (nor did I think this would either but a cheap try)

Bought a ECT sensor for $50.00 and simply drained about a gallon of anti-freeze from rad.

About a 20 minute job really.

Did not fix the problem

Purchased an EGR valve as mine did seem to be sticking a tad when I got old one off.

Am driving the car and will see if that is the culprit.

Since it happens so sporadically (sometimes a week or so apart) I cannot tell right away what works and what does not.

It is not throwing any codes apparently either, since they tried at Auto Zone to check them but no luck with that venue.

I have a $15.00 fuel filter to try and but I am hoping it was the EGR valve!?

To be continued...

Cheers

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Had exactly the same thing on my previous camry. After lots of trial and error a trip to Toll House Toyota in Horsham solved it for about £500 for a new electronic ignition/distributor thing. not sure what it was called. 100% fix for 50k miles before I sold it and got a 2003 CDX, no problems here yet.

tim

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Update to anyone with this problem on their Camry 4 cylinder. My original post #83 in this thread when car had 66k on it. After the egr replacement this car has not had a single issue regarding stalling when up to temperature. I am now at 30,000 miles since repair and not a single issue. To anyone who has done the coolant temperature sensor replacement and has not fixed the issue as I did, try the egr IT WORKS!

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I wanted to share my experience with this problem because this thread has been very helpful.

First off, BIG thanks to Ive. You saved me a TON of money because what I was expecting to be a very expensive problem was solved by a $13 ECT Sensor.

My 1996 4-cylinder Camry has 247,000 miles on it. A couple of months ago I noticed that it would shift roughly every now and then when I was driving down the interstate. Then it started surging up to 2,500 RPMs every now and then when I was idling at a stoplight. It would surge up and then drop hard. I had to make sure that I stayed back from the vehicle in front of me and kept a heavy foot on the breaks because it would lurch forward at times. I just figured that my transmission was showing its age.

Then it started to just cut off and die while idling. It only happened about once a week and every time the car started right up so I wasn’t too worried. Then it started happening more frequently and taking longer for the car start back up after it died. It always started up fine if it had been sitting for a while and at first it only died on me after I had driven it around and the car had warmed up. The other thing I noticed was that whenever I pulled in to my office in the morning or my garage in the afternoon after my 20 mile or so interstate commute the car would surge up to 2,500+ RPMs when I put it into park.

Last week I left work in the afternoon and it started up fine but as I was pulling in to a nearby gas station it died on me and I coasted to the pump. It cranked right up after I got gas but it did it again when I tried to pull out of the shopping center. I also smelled gas but I just figured that it was from what I had just pumped. It took a while but I finally got it started back up and it died on me at the next light. Got it going again and pulled into the Home Depot parking lot that was right there and called my wife to come get me. I just sat there with it idling and eventually it died and I couldn’t get it to crank back up. Through all of this the Check Engine light never came on.

When my wife got there we got a bite to eat and I decided to see if it would crank now that the interstate traffic had cleared out and my wife could follow me. It fired right up and I drove it home with no problems. I came across this forum after Googling “1996 Camry dies while idling” and the explanation in Ive’s post made complete sense considering all of my car’s symptoms. A friend of mine who is a Nissan mechanic hooked it up to his portable diagnostic machine and it wasn’t throwing any codes. That’s when I told him my theory about the ECT sensor and I could tell that he didn’t think that was the problem but he started watching the coolant temp readings on the diagnostic machine and sure enough the temps were randomly jumping all over the place. A new ECT sensor cost me $13 at AutoZone and it took no time at all to replace and the car now runs 1,000 times better.

I know this is a long post but I’ve seen some people say “My car died. Why does it do that?” on here and I’ve seen some people say they replaced the ECT sensor and it didn’t solve the problem. When you get a lot of miles on a car there are a number of reasons why something like this COULD happen: fuel filter, EGR, air intake, etc. The more symptoms you can identify and describe the easier it will be for someone to diagnose the problem. In my case all of the symptoms could be explained by the ECT sensor malfunctioning. Until I found this thread I had no idea what an ECT sensor was. The telltale sign was the temperature readings jumping all over the place.

A couple of tips for changing it: On my Camry the sensor is located on a part of the engine that sticks out from the right side of the engine block. It was really easy to get to fortunately. My mechanic friend has a ratchet attachment designed specifically for the ECT sensor so it was even easier. Make sure you do it when the engine is cold and open the radiator cap to relieve pressure first. I recommend doing it as a 2-man job. Person A takes the sensor out and Person B plugs the hole with his thumb because it will squirt up like a geyser unless you drain it down beforehand and I was too lazy for that. Also the old sensor should have a metal washer on it and the new one doesn’t come with one so be sure to take the washer from the old one before you install the new one. If the problem was caused by your ECT sensor it should be better immediately.

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Great solution and thanks for sharing.

But what is an ECT? I want to expand my knowledge! :D

Engine Coolant Temperature

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I have newfound respect for auto mechanics.

I can't seem to unscrew the lower bolt on my EGR valve. Can't get the wrench in at the right angle even if I remove the surrounding tubes/hoses.

Guess I don't have the right tool.

Has anyone else figured out how to remove a bolt at an extreme angle? Or in tight spaces?

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I have a 94 Camry and I used to have to hold the gas pedal, first thing in the morning. I cleaned the EGR sensor. (it's attached to the egr valve) It was very dirty. Now I don't have to hold it! :thumbsup:

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Use a Plummers wrench. The head swivels. (It's meant to remove the hose under your sink)

I have newfound respect for auto mechanics.

I can't seem to unscrew the lower bolt on my EGR valve. Can't get the wrench in at the right angle even if I remove the surrounding tubes/hoses.

Guess I don't have the right tool.

Has anyone else figured out how to remove a bolt at an extreme angle? Or in tight spaces?

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Problem found and resolved on my fiancés 92 Camry: coolant temp sensor.

After exhibiting all the same symptoms as you all, I went down to the Toyota dealer who misdiagnosed the distributor and igniter as being at fault. After they charged and arm and a leg, it stalled at the next stop light on the way home. Furious at Toyota, but tired and wanting to get home, I waited for the car to cool enough for it to start again and carefully drove home, doing the gas/brake deely with both feet.

I then took the car to a friend of a friend, a trusted non-Toyota mechanic that came highly recommended. He had the problem figured out and solved in 2 days. As I came to pick up the car, he explained to me what he did and how he figured it out. He had a snap-on computer, just smaller than the size of a laptop hooked up to several sensors in the engine compartment; he actually drove the car with wires hanging out of the hood going through the window to his computer, which acted like a real-time analyzer and data logger. As soon as the symptom arose, it was the temperature sensor that caused the fault.

As most of you may know, temperature sensors are just over-sized thermistors, which are devices that output a change in resistance in proportion to the heat that is detected. The ECU measures this resistance to determine the temperature of the engine, and based on such, gives the appropriate amount of fuel to cylinders to combust. The problem is that over time (at least so I've been told with Toyota temp sensors), they can fail after getting to a certain temperature. They would function cold and as they get hotter and hotter, they short/open and produce a false reading to the ECU. The ECU then sees this as a malfunction, and thinking that the motor is cold in an effort to avoid detonation, dumps WAY more fuel than needed and basically floods the engine. This is why after the car stalls and you try and start the car unsuccessfully, you can smell a heavy gas odor in/near the engine compartment. It's putting too much fuel for the temperature of the motor/air and stalling the motor. This is also why it stalls only when coming to a stop: because you don't have your foot on the gas to let more air in to balance out the extra fuel that is being sent into the engine.

Apparently, this is something of an issue with Toyota coolant temp sensors after a long period of time (at least told to me). I'm so ****** off with the Toyota dealer you cannot imagine. They cringe whenever I go down there because they couldn't fix my problem and charged me for something that wasn't even causing the issue. As far as I'm concerned, dealers can only fix problems to which they know the cause of, and do not know for the life of them how to troubleshoot issues! For this they can all go :censor:.

I tried all the other suggestions here before sending it to my friend's mechanic friend, with no resolvement. And no offence to anyone that offered such suggestions, but I was skeptical of them to begin with because none of them really seemed to be affected by heat, which our problem does. I did find comfort knowing we weren't alone in this, and thank you all for this great site and thread - in which I found by google.

After replacing the sensor, not only did the problem go away completely, but our gas mileage got considerably better, and the car exhibited a lot more power when hot. I hope this info will give you some insight to your dilemmas of the same nature, and provide you with much needed relief - and a good nights (worry-free) sleep!

Kind Regards,

Ive

Vancouver, BC

P.S. If anyone needs a perfectly working used distributor and coil, courtesy of my local Toyota's misdiagnosis, email me as I have one for sale. :)

03/07/2009

Thank You Ive ! 94 Camry 2.2 auto 160k miles. ERG was plugged with carbon. ( use a plumbers base wrench ($11) to remove ERG Valve ) Cleaned it but car continued to stall after driving 20-30 minutes and then going to an idle. Replaced heat sensor ( $30 ) on engines coolant exit. Runs great ! Your assessment that the car was flooding out when going to a hot idle fit our symptoms perfectly. Thank You Sir

05/05/10

More thanks Ive! 94 Camry 2.2 auto 140,000 miles. Started stalling in November of 09. First thought bad gas, then we replaced Distributor in Feb 2010, stalling continued and then worsened as spring arrived. Mechanic, was thinking fuel pump, then igniter, but fortunately I found your post. It was temp sensor cost me $45 plus his labor but what a relief!! Easiest and cheapest part to replace so this should definitely be tried first!

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96 Camry 4 cyl As mentioned before, my car would stall every couple weeks or so as I approached a stop. The idle would jump around then try to stall before I pumped the gas.

My first shot was the ECT (coolant sensor). That wasn't it.

This morning I purchased a new EGR valve and gasket and installed that. I noticed immediately my engine was running more smoothly. Let's see if it doesn't stall.

Thank you all for your posts. Very helpful.

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I have a 1992 Camry XLE 5S-FE 2.2L 4cyl automatic with 212K mi and the same warm stalling problem that many others have described, starting 6 mos ago and getting progressively worse, stalling at stop lights, in the middle of a turn, etc., and very hard to start after stalling. I could get around by keeping rpm above 2K by downshifting but my 16 year old daughter was afraid to drive it.

I tried the following procedures, none of which solved the problem.

  • PCV Valve replaced (not indicated but it's only $4)
  • Fuel Injector cleaner $5
  • ECT (Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor) replaced $15
  • Spray clean Throttle Body - clean with throttle body cleaner, e.g. seafoam $10
  • Remove and clean Throttle Body - lots of carbon deposits
  • Vacuum test EGR - apply vacuum works, measure vacuum none, engine still stalls w/ EGR closed ($30 for vacuum pump)
  • Remove and Clean EGR valve - lots of carbon deposits
  • Test IAC with ohm meter - OK
  • IAC Intake Air Control jumper test - OK
  • IAT Intake Air Temp test - OK
  • Pull plugs - all OK, none fouled

Note that the Chilton's manual for this model incorrectly identifies the Oil Pressure sensor as the Engine Knock Sensor.

At this point I took it to a mechanic I trust and who is reasonable in his prices. He noticed that while running smoothly above 2K rpm there was some missing. I had replaced plugs, wires, dist cap, and ignition coil less than 40K miles ago, so he suspected something in the distributor. He put it on the analyzer but it did not show anything. Since a new distributor is $180 I decided that it might be easier to get a new one than try to figure out what's wrong with the old. It's been running smoothly with the new distributor ever since.

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I was repairing a Camry 94 that always stall after a few minutes and won't star again until some 10 or 15 minutes. The owner had replaced the ignition cables, spark plugs, distributor (hole unit), igniter and vac switch. During diagnostic phase found the spark was missing right after each episode, tested the igniter once again (good) and according to the repair manual if the the igniter was OK then the ECM should be replaced. Removed the ECM and before getting a new one I decided to open and see if any physical damage was visible. Even without magnification found some fluid have leaked from the capacitor at the center of the board (47mfd-63V), replaced with exact part and no more trouble ever.

It may be that nobody else had experience this type of failure, but I doubt it. So if you have similar problems with the Camry 92-94 it could save you money before replacing the ECM to take a look inside, a few minutes and little money buy the part I found damaged.

I found the Repair Manual for the 94 Camry on the web.

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After skipping through this very long thread it seems that most of you cured the problem by changing the EGR unit.

For those that are still having a problem, try changing the "Cold Start" valve; this was causing identical problems with a 94 Previa. It was in and out of the garage for nearly a year, we even had the engine rebuilt to no effect and were in the process of scrapping the car when the fault was finally found (by accident).

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Ok folks let me add my two cents, more like $500 bucks. I purchased a New 95 Camry in 1995 for my grandmother. After 15 years she had only accumulated 65,000 miles so it was perfect for my 16 year olds first car. After warming up, 15 miles or so, it began to stall when stopped at lights? In my day I worked on many an engine and kept all my rides well…..Riding. The era of ECU’s IAC’s and ERG’s had not yet arrived. So after reading all of the blogs and alike I went through the following:

More as maintenance than repair I first replaced:

Plugs

Distributor Cap

Rotor

Plug Wires

Fuel Filter

Air Filter

Oil Change w/filter

Replaced Coolant and Thermostat

Checked for any Vacuum Leaks

With no improvement I went through one by one:

Coolant Temperature Sensor (on Radiator)

Checked Voltages on Throttle Position Sensor

Thorough cleaning, not removal, of the IAC (idle air control)

Tested Map Sensor

2nd Coolant Temperature Sensor (on engine)

Confirmed Air intake Temp Sensor

Replaced Coil

Removed and Cleaned EGR Valve and Controller

All to no avail.

Finally I replaced the IAC (Idle air control) Valve. It’s a bear to get off as it is on the bottom of the throttle body, it had been well cleaned but it was the culprit. Well over $200 from Toyota and most aftermarket sellers at ~ $150+ found on Amazon for $78

Problem solved.

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Update to anyone with this problem on their Camry 4 cylinder. My original post #83 in this thread when car had 66k on it. After the egr replacement this car has not had a single issue regarding stalling when up to temperature. I am now at 30,000 miles since repair and not a single issue. To anyone who has done the coolant temperature sensor replacement and has not fixed the issue as I did, try the egr IT WORKS!

This car now has over 40,000 miles since I replaced the EGR valve and I have not experienced a single problem. This is an easy low dollar fix if you do the repair yourself.

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Thank you Ive. My '94 Camry was doing exactly the same and I changed the plugs, air filter, fuel pump, tested the fuel filter and read everything I could get my hands on. Then I found this forum and your post and realized that must be it as it was related to the temperature of the motor. The cooler temperature sensor. A $15 part and 5 minutes to install. I'm really glad I didn't take it in to the shop and be left with $100's of repair bills. Thanks again.

After exhibiting all the same symptoms as you all, I went down to the Toyota dealer who misdiagnosed the distributor and igniter as being at fault. After they charged and arm and a leg, it stalled at the next stop light on the way home. Furious at Toyota, but tired and wanting to get home, I waited for the car to cool enough for it to start again and carefully drove home, doing the gas/brake deely with both feet.

I then took the car to a friend of a friend, a trusted non-Toyota mechanic that came highly recommended. He had the problem figured out and solved in 2 days. As I came to pick up the car, he explained to me what he did and how he figured it out. He had a snap-on computer, just smaller than the size of a laptop hooked up to several sensors in the engine compartment; he actually drove the car with wires hanging out of the hood going through the window to his computer, which acted like a real-time analyzer and data logger. As soon as the symptom arose, it was the temperature sensor that caused the fault.

As most of you may know, temperature sensors are just over-sized thermistors, which are devices that output a change in resistance in proportion to the heat that is detected. The ECU measures this resistance to determine the temperature of the engine, and based on such, gives the appropriate amount of fuel to cylinders to combust. The problem is that over time (at least so I've been told with Toyota temp sensors), they can fail after getting to a certain temperature. They would function cold and as they get hotter and hotter, they short/open and produce a false reading to the ECU. The ECU then sees this as a malfunction, and thinking that the motor is cold in an effort to avoid detonation, dumps WAY more fuel than needed and basically floods the engine. This is why after the car stalls and you try and start the car unsuccessfully, you can smell a heavy gas odor in/near the engine compartment. It's putting too much fuel for the temperature of the motor/air and stalling the motor. This is also why it stalls only when coming to a stop: because you don't have your foot on the gas to let more air in to balance out the extra fuel that is being sent into the engine.

Apparently, this is something of an issue with Toyota coolant temp sensors after a long period of time (at least told to me). I'm so ****** off with the Toyota dealer you cannot imagine. They cringe whenever I go down there because they couldn't fix my problem and charged me for something that wasn't even causing the issue. As far as I'm concerned, dealers can only fix problems to which they know the cause of, and do not know for the life of them how to troubleshoot issues! For this they can all go :censor:.

I tried all the other suggestions here before sending it to my friend's mechanic friend, with no resolvement. And no offence to anyone that offered such suggestions, but I was skeptical of them to begin with because none of them really seemed to be affected by heat, which our problem does. I did find comfort knowing we weren't alone in this, and thank you all for this great site and thread - in which I found by google.

After replacing the sensor, not only did the problem go away completely, but our gas mileage got considerably better, and the car exhibited a lot more power when hot. I hope this info will give you some insight to your dilemmas of the same nature, and provide you with much needed relief - and a good nights (worry-free) sleep!

Kind Regards,

Ive

Vancouver, BC

P.S. If anyone needs a perfectly working used distributor and coil, courtesy of my local Toyota's misdiagnosis, email me as I have one for sale. :)

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With regard to the 1994 Camry's stalling or any problems with the TCC solenoid. The issue can be isolated by shifting the car into neutral if you feel it starting to die out at a stoplight. If the car is stuttering and you shift from drive to neutral or park and the RPM's recover it could be the TCC solenoid. The TCC solenioid can also be cleaned out by dropping the transmission pan, unplugging the solenoid and removing the part. If the soleniod is completly non-functional and there is no damage to the transmission as a result, the TCC solenoid may need to be replaced. I just did one last week , always repalce the transmission gasket and torque pan to specifications.

Matt

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Stalling problems on Generation 4 and later cars can be due to a "lazy" front air fuel sensor. It will NOT produce a cel code. The sensor apparently fails to signal a change to rich requirement after the car has been sitting (and cooling) for a short time after running. A clue is that FULL THROTTLE will cause the engine to catch again...(full throttle bypasses the controls and just DUMPS fuel into the engine) These sensors seem to last about 100 K miles. I have TWO Camrys which have been through this, BOTH with the (bleepin) "California emissions package" which is more expensive, partswise, than the "49 STATE" version and which was sold all over the USA despite being "California." Rock Auto and such places will provide a new DENSO AF sensor for about 100 bucks which may be OEM. NGK also sells an AF sensor but it is at least twice as expensive. It may last longer, however. Dealers are baffled by this problem because the droids who work there can't fix ANYTHING without the check engine light code. They also employ the "milk 'em for as much as possible" practice which is a result of using "service writers" who work on commission.

Once a "lazy" AF sensoe "flips" as it is supposed to and sends the correct AF reading to the ECU, the engine runs fine. In warm weather, the engine temp doesn't reach the critical temp affected by the delayed flip... this problem often doesn't show up until fall and is not noticable in warmer weather until the sensor gets really "lazy". THe sensor, on the I 4 is located right on the exhaust manifold, and a 7/8 wrench will fit it,... and the connector will fit right through the wrench. It looks like a spark plug, without the white insulator, protrudes from a hole in the heat shield, and a 4 wire cable runs back to a bracket right on the cylinder head. You will probably break the cheap bolts holding the heat shields on, but they can be reattached with a big hose clamp. A nice touch is spraying the heat shield with flat black gas grill paint, which lasts a long time. Be sure ti use the copper colored grease on the new sensor threads, it will make replacing it AGAIN an east task.

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I was repairing a Camry 94 that always stall after a few minutes and won't star again until some 10 or 15 minutes. The owner had replaced the ignition cables, spark plugs, distributor (hole unit), igniter and vac switch. During diagnostic phase found the spark was missing right after each episode, tested the igniter once again (good) and according to the repair manual if the the igniter was OK then the ECM should be replaced. Removed the ECM and before getting a new one I decided to open and see if any physical damage was visible. Even without magnification found some fluid have leaked from the capacitor at the center of the board (47mfd-63V), replaced with exact part and no more trouble ever.

It may be that nobody else had experience this type of failure, but I doubt it. So if you have similar problems with the Camry 92-94 it could save you money before replacing the ECM to take a look inside, a few minutes and little money buy the part I found damaged.

I found the Repair Manual for the 94 Camry on the web.

That's an "electrolytic" capacitor, and they are a prime suspect in failures in older equpiment. Good Japanese caps, (made by Panasonic, among others,) and American mil spec caps hold up well, but since the Chinese got into the act, and THOUGHT they had "doped out" the proper chemicals to use (the stuff you saw leaking) they sold millions of caps to motherboard makers and other users which, shall wwe say. didn't last very long. If they are not "vented" when they begin to fail and heat up they can explode with a nice pop. At lease you get as hint as to what is wrong.

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I'm new and I almost hate to add to this thread but, I have almost the same problem. 1993 Camry V6. The check engine light is on. When I start the vehicle, I have wait about 5 minutes before I put it in gear or it will stall. Once the engine warms up, it is fine. I don't have the same as many others in the thread because I can drive it all day and it will not stall again unless I leave it off for about 5 hours or more. Any suggestions.

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My mum has a 2005 Camry Altese V6, in white, it is intermited start up issues.

She taken it to the service place twice now, and they cannot pick it up

Does anyone know what causes this?

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I've been reading this thread for a couple of weeks now and have a similar bad idle when the engine is heated up. I've got a 1996 Camry 5SFE with 216k miles. So far I've replaced the ECT and the IAC with little improvement. Changing the IAC may have had the most positive affect but the car is still wanting to idle poorly at stops. This idle problem has been happening for about 2yrs but very intermittent until the past three months and it's very annoying. The check engine light is off. There are no codes pending.

This forum thread has led me think the EGR valve or an oxygen sensor. I'm leaning towards the oxygen sensor on the following reasons:

* fuel mileage is at 24mpg, where it should be closer to 30

* my mechanic used to work for Toyota and he's never replaced an EGR before

This year has been rough on my car. I've had to replace the transmission because the differential went dry. Soon after that was replaced the VSV threw up a P0401 code and my mechanic changed that and the vacuum modulator valve. So now I'm down to the idle problem.

A few posts ago it was mentioned to change a sensor using the 7/8 bolt pattern to fix this. This appears to be the sub-oxygen sensor in the Haynes manual. What are the odds it will be the fix given the reduced fuel mileage? This car has been very reliable and the transmission episode is the only time I've been stranded. Let me know if I'm headed in the right direction.

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Well, it was the EGR valve. I isolated the problem by sucking on a length of vacuum hose to the top of the EGR while spraying Deep Creep into the side port. I modulated the throttle and sprayed into the opened valve several times then buttoned everything up and took it out on a test drive. I was unable to invoke the poor idle condition after several miles on the interstate and at a few areas around town the trigger it. If it happens again I'll take the car in to get the EGR cleaned or replaced.

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Well, it wasn't the EGR valve or the AF ratio sensor.

More observations: It happens most often on warm/hot days and days with high humidity while going uphill. Because I live in the SE USA I have plenty of those kinds of days. I've been able to get the engine to do the stall thing pretty often when slowing from 60mph to a stop on a slight incline. This has been more and more repeatable. I was able to drive it to my mechanic but the car completely stalled in his lot before he could get out of the office.

Since then I've replaced the plugs, wires, air filter, distributor cap and rotor. The cap and rotor were original, so with 222kmi they looked pretty rough. The plugs looked good with no fouling and were replaced with regular NGK single platinum plugs. The wires looked ok but I didn't check the resistance; I replaced them with NGK OEM wires. The inside of the cap had some Oil in it as the distributor shaft seal is on its way out. The main o-ring for the distributor is leaking, too, as I see Oil dripping out the bottom of the seal, and onto the electrical connection, and on the top of the transaxle.

Since replacing the above devices the car runs great and hasn't stalled at the three places along my daily drive where it normally would. More info to come. I do know a distributor is in my near future and can be installed relatively painlessly.

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