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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Sounds great, as it should be! I had the same experience with Mazda seats: set and forget. Thanks for all the answers (got some DMs as well). This was my last doubt, and I am now waiting for my Corolla Hatchback to be delivered! Yay!
    3 points
  2. https://www.tayna.co.uk/car-batteries/
    2 points
  3. So, thank you everyone that got back to me, went to Toyota waterlooville and picked up my touch up paint, 8b6 bright blue metallic, thatโ€™s what it says on the tin! Lol, perfect base blue with a clear coat as well, ยฃ11 all in, very happy now ๐Ÿ™‚
    2 points
  4. Hi You will need to make sure you are logged in to see the forum. @Cyker I also noticed you were not in the right rank group for the amount of posts you have, Not sure why that was so i placed you in the "Established member" rank which should give you a better experience when logged in. The forums work on a "more contributions, less ads" basis, so you are in the highest rank now. Hope this helps. As for the block not attracting members, this is not the case, we have actually seen 5 fold increase in member sign ups and also more posts and topics created daily now. So even though as harsh as it is, by them registering they get a better experience (less ads) and as now part of the club actually start to participate, which is what the club is all about.
    2 points
  5. While Frosty's point about GPS speeds is true, on straight, level roads the speed integrated by the system will be pretty accurate. Think a line of circular positions about 10 feet radius. At the same time, with the cruise control set at 65 (not ACC) the GPS speed varied between 59 and 60. To Frosty's last point, it is very satisfying going for the burn. A track day at your nearest speedway can get that out of your system. I took a Lamborghini to a blistering 55 mph ๐Ÿ˜ For real speed go to Germany but do pick a quieter autobahn, check your tyres and brakes, and remember 105 is 50% faster than the UK max and the stopping distance is huge.
    2 points
  6. Toyota published a bulletin regards upcoming MY22 Corolla today: HB & TS MY21.5 Production stops December 2021 & MY22 Production commences January 2022, November production is fully allocated and only 12 spare slots still available for December production. Bi-toe options fully allocated so new orders will automatically be transferred to MY22 variant & TREK 1.8 fully allocated. 2 x new colours Platinum Pearl white (089) & Silver metallic (1L0) New Toyota smart connect standard from Icon Tech Additional connected car functionality TREK discontinued in current spec, MY22 will be 2.0 Tourer only with exclusive 18" alloy wheels, Black leather interior & Satin Chrome deco trim for dash & door, Chrome window surrounds & piano black door pull trim. Hybrid badges removed for all models Saloon Dates as per HB/TS however all 2021 production is allocated so any new orders will me matched to MY22 production. New colour Silver metallic (1L0) 17" alloys wheels to match MY21.5 Corolla design New Toyota smart connect standard from Icon Tech Additional connected car functionality Hybrid badges removed for all models
    1 point
  7. Can't imagine it would be different to any other combustion engine, as VVTi is just variable valve timing. You want to vary your engine speed and load, but without taking the rpm too high or using full throttle - everything in moderation. Above all else, avoid long periods at a constant engine speed. Keep a close eye on the oil level as consumption can sometimes be a bit higher during break-in.
    1 point
  8. I'd forgotten you could change the lumbar support! I set it to be comfortable when the car was delivered 21 months ago and it's still comfortable now. Truly a set and forget feature!
    1 point
  9. Welcome to Toyota Owners Club - Toyota Forum. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. Why not introduce yourself in the New Members section.
    1 point
  10. OK, I'll keep checking in. When I first joined I was aware this was a UK based forum, I joined, partially, so I wouldn't forget how to write in English (I'm from the UK, but have been gone so long). I realise that there among quite a few expats, a significant smattering of non-UK members.
    1 point
  11. @Dexter290 I presume you mean the Yaris Cross with a manual gearbox, some people just can't adjust to change, and I suppose it's what the local market will bear. After all, Dacia (the Roman name for Romania) was originally touted as purely for low cost markets.
    1 point
  12. Cannot say for sure, but pretty sure mechanical - you hear a motor running when activated in either direction...no sensation of releasing air as you move in and it certainly holds position once set.
    1 point
  13. The same point applies to the Prius - as it has always been hybrid, is there a continuing need to identify it as hybrid? The same scenario applies to the other UK models which are now only available as hybrids - Yaris, Yaris Cross, C-HR, Rav4, Camry, Highlander, etc. Deleting the hybrid badge will reduce costs by a small amount per car, but when viewed from a production viewpoint savings will be greater.
    1 point
  14. I believe all but the base model in the UK have parking sensors front and rear
    1 point
  15. In the UK, legally the speedometer must never show an indicated speed less than the actual speed. For all actual speeds between 25 mph and 70 mph (or the vehicles' maximum speed if it is lower than this), the indicated speed must not exceed 110% of the actual speed, plus 6.25 mph. For speeds either side of 25 mph and 70 mph, the indicated speed must not exceed 110% of the actual speed. Eg, if the vehicle is actually traveling at 50 mph, the speedometer must not show more than 61.25 mph or less than 50 mph. The above differs from the EU, where the speedometer must not exceed 110% of the actual speed. GPS readings, although generally more accurate than speedometer readings, are an average over a given number of points, so not totally accurate as regards speed at a given point in time. Note that the forum rules state: Don't post about things that break the law, or that might encourage others to break the law. Posts that break the above rule, whether reported by members or otherwise, may be subject to moderator action
    1 point
  16. That's really good. Plus the fact you don't give up. Ask away, there will always be someone to help. Flash22 is something of an encyclopaedia here!
    1 point
  17. If it's any consolation to all you guys in the UK, I ordered mine, a LHD Yaris Cross Style here in Spain, doesn't seem to have an exact equivalent to the UK models, but 3rd up from base out of 4 if you see what I mean, no extras and Oliva Bronce colour, ie no premium paint job. Was told 6-8 weeks for delivery and currently at 8.5 weeks and not a sign and yes I am checking MyT about every 2 hours.
    1 point
  18. Hi Jon, couldn't put a picture in on a PM but this what I have.
    1 point
  19. Hi there, New here and thought I'd share my experience on how I removed the offside (drivers) rear wheel bearing assembley from an old 2006 Peugeot 107! Had watched several Utube video's, not sure I can mention that name directly here, showing several means to remove the bearing. Raising the car and removed the road wheel and brake drum first, then had problems undoing the 4 x 12mm blots holding the bearing onto the rear axle and brake drum back plate. All heavily corroded and the 12mm socket/spanners just turned, an 11mm wouldn't fit. After a good rumage in the bottom of my tool box found a very old 1/4BS 3/16W socket that fitted well, after plenty of pentrating oil the bolts released relatively easily. Very lucky that socket hadn't been binned long ago! Set to work with a slide hammer and a hub puller as shown in one video, as I had these already. Lots of penetrating oil but no sign of anything moving at all. Cleaned back all the corrosion I could find around the back of the bearing where it's exposed to all the elements but made no difference. Then read an article on this form suggesting a makeshift hub puller or pusher using M10 threaded bar with 6 nuts. Two lengths of 15cm of M10 bar passed through two opposing wheel bolt holes with a washer and nut placed behind the outer bearing flange and then two nuts on the very end locked together so the make shift pusher could be held whilst turning the 3rd nut to force the bearing from it's housing pushing against brake backplate. Two days trying these in varying combinations and the most the bearing moved was well under 1mm, even after the application of a heavy club hammer! A wrecked slide hammer and stripped thread repeatedly on most of the M10 bar I'd bought. Gave up after the second night and had a rethink. Third time, after a day off, I decided on a different approach! Found an old heavy duty metal drift about 25cm long and just the right diametre to fit between the bearing outer flange and the forward brake shoe resting the end against the top righthand lobe of the wheel bearing mounting and with the trusty lump hammer pounded until the mounting plate started to rotate anti clockwise, did the same on the bottom righthand lobe of the bearing mounting and watched as the mounting rotated back clockwise. More penetrating oil and repeated the process until the bearing mounting plate began to rotate more easily. Now I thought why use a hub puller/pusher when I could use the four bearing mounting bolts. Replaced them, having realigned the holes, but leaving each bolt undone by about 3 to 6mm. Placed the 3/16W socket with a long extension bar attached so I could work around the rear spring on the corroded blots and hit each in turn with the club hammer. To my relief the gap between the back plate and the mounting flange increased quickly and the bearing was nearly out. Removed all four mounting bolts and with a good tug the whole bearing came straight out like a "good Un"! No need for a slide hammer, hub puller or improvised tools. Dare say the penetratiing oil having had three days to work and all the failed attempts to remove the bearing may have made some difference towards the bearing finally coming free with my own take on removal. This seemed to work so much better than all the other ways I'd seen or had read about. Driving the bearing mounting to rotate in alternate directions until it turned fairly freely made a huge difference and also allowed to me to leave the brake shoes in place and left the old bearing relatively unscathed in the event I needed to refit it. Hope someone else here might find this a good alternative approach to removing these rear wheel bearings, they're a real nightmare.
    1 point
  20. I'd give the spark plugs a miss though being as it's a diesel
    1 point
  21. Hello, Did not find so far in my docs the fuse for fuel pump, but apparently R4 the relay part of the hidden "fuse box BF01 with soldered 4 relays module" under the engine compartment fuse box. ( https://fuse-box.info/toyota/toyota-aygo-ab10-2005-2014-fuses-and-relay ) May be surfing on the parts catalog (with your VIN) may help locating parts : http://europe.toylexparts.com/aygo/101510/kgb10l-agggkw/526w/001/4/8401 Also i found in my archives this thread without warranty having a diagram discussing BF01 and content (while mismatch with assignment R3 or R4 ...) this may give some clues to test few checkpoints ?
    1 point
  22. Trek model I liked as lighter interior seats. If read right all black leather? Oh I wish Toyota had more interior colour/leather, headliner options. 16 inch alloys as Icon Tech is what I would choose. Ride comfort more important than huge alloys and everything black! James๐Ÿ‘
    1 point
  23. 'over the air' updates sound good. 'Hybrid badges removed for all models' .. hmm, cost saving or to deter cat thieves? My Corolla already has this feature, courtesy of some dental floss! ๐Ÿ˜
    1 point
  24. There are few people previously mentioned especially for the 18โ€ wheels that going from falkens to Michelin or Goodyear made a big difference in noise and comfort. The post called best tyres for Corolla if I remember correctly ๐Ÿ‘
    1 point
  25. I would double-check that oil spec, I have the tech sheet somewhere, Crack the fill plug loose before you drain it A 24 mm socket rings a bell
    1 point
  26. Wooo! Extra hour of sleep! And for the first time ever I have a Yaris I can just press a button to go back and hour instead of advancing the hour all the way around!
    1 point
  27. Useful to see all that in one place. Dimensions are a critical part of any prospective purchase and I've found this to be useful: Automobile Dimensions There is a 'garage simulator at the bottom of the pages where you can try any vehicle for size in your own parking space. Edit... you can also compare new and older versions.
    1 point
  28. Welcome to Toyota Owners Club - Toyota Forum. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. Why not introduce yourself in the New Members section.
    1 point
  29. Difficulty - Medium Time - About an hour Tools - A 24mm or 15/16AF spanner or socket, a 10mm hex socket or allen key for the transfer box and rear diff', a suitable draining container, a supply of rags and either an oil pump or at least one half litre oil bottle with a filler nozzle as shown in the photos. Frequency - Every 20,000 miles or 2 years (every second service). To get about under my car I put the front on the ramps and the rear onto some wooden blocks. Do not use brick or concrete blocks as they can crumble without warning. It is not necessary to have the vehicle level (fill the unit to the level plug) if you measure the oil in and I find the best way is with those half litre bottles which have a scale on the side. The transfer box and the rear axle take 0.9 litres of oil. Don't beat yourself up about measuring this accurately as 0.1 of a litre is about a table spoon full. Try to get 2 half litre bottles in each one. You will find that it is easier to squeeze the oil out of a part full bottle than a nearly empty one so I order 2.5 litres and keep transfering fresh oil into a container noting how much is going in. It will make sense once you start! In these pictures you will see the use of an oil pump but half litre bottles are just as good. It is often cheaper to buy oil in 5 litre drums so be sure to check the prices first. I have saved some old half litre bottles and decant the oil into them for measuring and filling. Starting with the gearbox; So 3.4 litres of API GL5 75W/90 You can remove the filler plug first to let the air in; Then drain the oil into a suitable container; Clean all the plugs carefully. Keep them to the same place they came from as some are magnetic to attract the debris.; Here is that pump I was on about! Only the !Removed! go to so much trouble!!!; To do the transfer box approach the drain plug from the front and to get at the filler - under the drivers door; 0.9 litres of Hypoid API GL5 SAE 90 (very important to use this extreme pressure [EP] oil) goes back in; This is a better view of the filler; Now around to the back and drain the diff'. You need a 10mm allen key; Add some more of the same oil as the transfer box - 0.9 litres;
    1 point
  30. hi mate do you have the oil recommendations for the 2010 2.2d 4wd 2010 model, i wanna do a full transmission oil service including diffs, i just can't seem to find out exactly what oil goes where Transmission 2.5lt API GL-4 SAE75 Transfer box .45lt API GL-5 SAE 85W-90 Rear diff .55lt Hypoid gear oil SX API GL-5 SAE 85W-90
    1 point
  31. You will find several technical guides pinned at the top of the RAV4 forum page. Follow this short cut to access them. If you can't find what you are looking for, just post in the forum and somebody will be along shortly! http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=71649
    1 point
  32. Oh sorry, I think you asked me about this before. The transfer box and the rear diff is done every second service or intervals of 20k miles. There is no requirement to change the oil in the box, one of these sealed for life jobbies. However, I will do mine about every 4th year. Use only the proper 75 grade oil and sit down before paying for it. I always take off the undershield to do the transmission oil. Take the plug out of the transfer box and let it drain (green circle). Don't bother with the level plug, there is a filler plug high up (blue arrow) which is easier to get at; 0.45 litres of GL5 80W/90 You might find one of these useful; http://www.toolbox.c...se-15887-110762 OK, if you do choose to change the gearbox oil you need to remove the drain plug; Then the filler plug; But don't try to fill it through the front unless you have the above pump as you can't tip normal oil bottles up. Instead, take off the small access panel under the wing (2 clips) and fill from under there. It only takes 2.1 litres; OK now round the back of the vehicle and take out the drain plug (green circle - passenger side). Because of the internal clutch this will come out filthy; Now round to the drivers side and take out the level plug (blue circle). Fill with 0.55 litres of GL5 80W/90 and you will see why one of those pumps is a good investment - it is very awkward with an oil bottle!; PLEASE NOTE:- 2009 on models should use SX API GL5 85W/90 for the transfer box and diff' according to the data sheets. The only place I've managed to find this is from Toyota themselves.
    1 point
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