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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/14/2020 in all areas

  1. As HS78. I changed my own about two months ago. Used a pressure hand pump/reservoir screwed on to the car's reservoir, pressurisd to 15psi/1bar and opened each bleed nipple in turn starting at the furthest from the master cylinder. Didn't have to raise the car at all. Took less than an hour. Observe the fluid level in the pump unit and maintain the pressure. Sucked out some of the car's reservoir first leaving enough so as not to introduce any air. Total cost - about £25 including the pump and Comma DOT4 fluid (Amazon Warehouse, damaged box!) which can be used again many times. Brakes are working fine!
    2 points
  2. In fact, on the Toyota Hybrids, the paddle shifts make very little difference to anything except when decelerating. You may find when using the shift while cruising or accelerating the revs rise briefly, but that's just the Hybrid system forcing the engine to rev more and the man Motor/Generator less. Accelerating hard will see the system do its own thing regardless. However, when decelerating, it causes the punping action of the engine to be increased more with lower 'gear' numbers to aid control or deceleration. It's like a variable B mode on Hybrids that on have a 'B' position on the shifter for extra control when braking. Beware that both B (brake) mode and S (Shift) mode (incorrectly called Sport mode by some reviewers) assist with engine braking but at the expense of regeneration. Because the pumping action of the engine is responsible for some of the braking, there is less energy left to push against the Motor/Generator and therefore charge the HV battery. Some time ago a few engineering types on another group wired up an ammeter into the system and proved this. B & S modes make most sense on the very rare occasions (for most owners) that the HV battery becomes completely "Maxed Out" full, usually when descending very long (>3 mile), steep hills with the brakes pedal pressed. When the 8th bar first lights up on the HV battery gauge, it is usually some time before the battery is truly maxed out. In 330,000 Hybrid miles over 18 years I've only experience true max out about a couple of dozen times, on a couple of tours of Scotland, and trips to Devon and the Isle of Man. I've also occasionally found B mode useful in icy/snowy conditions to help give extra control with less use of the brake pedal. I've not yet driven in such conditions on a model with S mode, but expect the same would apply.
    2 points
  3. That is horrendous! imagine if it did it on the motorway! ~shudder~ I agree I would want rid of the car, I don't think I would be able to trust it again unless they can be utterly sure what the fault is, and not just what they think it is or might be.
    1 point
  4. I don't have this problem, as my brakes are strong with not much pressure to the brake pedal. I have driven other cars (different makes), and the brake pedal on those need a good shove, as though the brakes are not working! I have driven a car many years ago, and the pipe to the servo lost a cap to the non return valve, so no servo. I had to stand on the pedal to slow the car. Replacing the pipe was easy, but it was a frightening experience when it first happened. The other issues is if there is a leak in the hydraulic system. I have had that in past cars, and pumping the pedal is a sign that the brake fluid is contaminated. When changing the brake pads, the pedal is pumped after the work is done. If you have to do the same, then I would say hydraulics than the servo.
    1 point
  5. I can hear mine a little but, having heard some on other makes of cars (diesel engines mask theirs), I am not to bothered. So long as the pump is working, is all that matters. The part numbers did change from 29300-0W022 the early 2009/11 version, to 29300-0T020 later version 2011 onward. I went to the following for info - http://www.japan-parts.eu/toyota/eu/2009/avensis/zrt271r-awfepw/2_273560_041_410W/tool-engine-fuel/1905_vacuum-pump#29300 http://www.japan-parts.eu/toyota/eu/2014/avensis/zrt271l-awfepw/2_273560_035_530W/tool-engine-fuel/1905_vacuum-pump#29300 I like the site the OP referenced to.
    1 point
  6. I haven't opened it but when my 2009 got new fitted toyota service said that there has been two updates made on facelifts for it so there might be differences on different versions.
    1 point
  7. DO NOT BUY ANY automated manual - MMT was pants...
    1 point
  8. Here we go, as I edit episode 112, here's the latest episode for you all to watch, and thank you for doing so.
    1 point
  9. Thanks Eddie, at the moment this is pretty much an experiment on sizing. I'm working with the lady that is cutting the sticker for me, whilst I work on a few size issues, and the additional stickers needed to finish the car off. Hopefully once it's all okay, I will have the bumpers ready to go on, and "some" of the dents taken out. I think the car needs either a water pump or oil pump, or possibly a drive belt pulley as it's making a noise lol.
    1 point
  10. page 14 lists the models and specs https://media.toyota.co.uk/wp-content/files_mf/1596183787YarisGen3LaunchPack2011.pdf
    1 point
  11. TR is the spec of the car, iirc TR is one of the middle specs with the T Spirit being top of the range the Mk3 yaris automatics are CVT or eCVT in the hybrid
    1 point
  12. The Yaris SR from that period has leather seats, wider wheels and handles nicely. Son has owned one for 4 years with no issues.
    1 point
  13. I can't speak for the Corolla but all my Jazz had them. I only ever found two uses for them - one of which was dubious :) * Option 1: When overtaking hit the down paddle twice to get the car close to the red line. Then, as you mash the accelerator, switch the box back into CVT mode. The result was that you accelerated at peak torque for as long as you kept the accelerator down or the car ran out of steam. For a 1.3 litre engine it was surprising just how much punch you got. Basically it's a manual kick-down. * Option 2: When descending a hill switching to 7-speed mode gave you better engine braking. But in normal driving it was pointless. The first Jazz could be switched into 7-speed mode and would happily change gear for you or you could use the paddles. Neither was much cop. In manual mode the paddles were hardly ever where your fingers were because the wheel was often turned to negotiate a junction. Left to its own devices it behaved like an old automatic box - gear hunting going up hills and changing gear half way round roundabouts. It was interesting to note that on the second Jazz Honda removed the 'switch to manual' button and only went into manual mode if you used the paddles. It would also drop out of manual mode when you stopped. The third Jazz I had (my previous car) they'd gone even further and the box left manual mode as soon as the car reached 'steady state' so manual mode was clearly being seen as a temporary thing. I think paddles on a CVT box or indeed any kind of auto that isn't actually a sports car are pointless.
    1 point
  14. The logic I believe is for people who either want to feel like they are driving something "sporty" and for those not used to the CVT being just one gear and not having what normal upshifts are in other auto cars.
    1 point
  15. 15 minutes!, I just did mine tonight literally took me about 3 minutes 😂👍
    1 point
  16. We had a Carina E bought new in 1994 and on holiday that year in the far north of Scotland I noticed that as my father drove off the brake lights seemed non functional. A quick check showed this to be so and a call to Toyota (from a phone box in the middle of nowhere) resulted in the car being trailered next day a distance of around 50 miles each way to a main dealer in Inverness where a brake light switch (which became an infamous recall as this became a common failure) was taken from a showroom model. The service was exemplary and the car was returned on a trailer just a few hours later.
    1 point
  17. Thanks Tony for outlining that. I will indeed ask about the pipe and try to get the details.
    1 point
  18. Shame the stickers are not spot on at the moment but from a distance she looks real good 👍
    1 point
  19. Hi it looks like a engine knock sensor
    1 point
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